Skip to main content

Full text of "Seamen's Journal (Sept.8,1920-Aug.31,1921)"

See other formats


y.y./ 



xm 



',» '.''.',' 



mWWrctWS 






^mhTsrs^'w •r-'-'sssffg 'i ^■^■•'i^N^^'SBaSfg 



INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-FOUR 

SEPTEMBER 8, 1920— AUGUST 31, 1921 



All editorial matter is designated by an 
asterisk (*). 

Title No. Page 
A 

A. B. Heard From, An (by James 

Forbes) 8 2 

Actors Hard Hit, Movie 41 11 

Age of the Earth 15 9 

Alaska Fishermen's Contract 35 1 

Alaska Fishing Regulations 26 1 

American Federation of Labor — 

A. F. of L. Takes Action * 26 6 

A. F. of L. Weekly News Letter- 
See issues. 

Confused Patriot, A 33 3 

Fmployers Make Mistake * 48 6 

Immigration and Exploitation 25 3 

Men of Labor, Onward! 47 9 

Miners' Strike, The 36 3 

Seamen Before A. F. of L 44 2 

Seamen's Law Defense 24 3 

Shipowners Camouflage 38 3 

Sid Hatfield Murdered 49 5 

Toward the Goal * 5 6 

Unions Block Reaction 49 7 

Union Shop and "Shop LTnion" 45 7 

American-Japanese Relations 18 1 

''American Plan" Defined * 28 6 

American Plan, The 46 9 

American Protectorates (by W. L. 

Chenery) 15 2 

American Ships Increase 49 8 

American Views, An (by J. H. Eveland) 36 9 
Americanism? Is This (by Julius Nel- 
son ) 48 8 

Americans." "Better * 4 6 

Arbitration, Anti-Strike Laws, Etc. — 

British Coal Strike, The 16 2 

"Can't-Strike" Law Is Costly 13 2 

Decrease Hit Tugs 44 8 

Engineers Renew Agreement 12 2 

Wage Conference (Pacific Steamship 
Company; Matson Navigation Com- 
pany and the Marine Engineers' 

Beneficial Association No. 35) 20 5 

Army Casualties, U. S 17 2 

"Article X," Dissecting (by Senator 

Borah) .' 3 7 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

American-Japanese Relations 18 1 

Coolie Competition 18 9 

Harmony in Japan * 19 6 

Hawaii Nearly Half Jap 52 11 

Importing Chinese Coolies 12 5 

Japan. Doings in * 4 6 

Japanese Exclusion Progress * 33 6 

Japanese Families, Large 15 11 

Japanese Labor Awake 19 11 

Japanese Problem, The 6 1 

Japanese Seamen's Merger * 18 6 

Obtaining Results * 47 6 

Reason for Suppression. A * 40 6 

Speculators and Cultivators 4 9 

Assert Your Rights 44 8 



Title No. Page 
Atlantic and Gulf Coasts — 

Atlantic and Gulf Section of the Jour- 
nal — See issues 1 to 52. 

Atlantic Fishermen's Agreement IS 1 

Atta Roy ! Atlantic * 40 7 

Fire Below! (Baggage Room of the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion afire) 34 9 

Grasping An Opportunity * 25 7 

Hope and Faith (by Charles Martell). 49 8 
Located at Last (Marine Cooks and 

Stewards' Association new building) 7 8 

Lockout Facts Stated 36 1 

Need for Resistance, A * 36 6 

Perjury of Persecution (crew of the 

"Ruth E. Merrill") 11 8 

Reflections from Atlantic * 23 6 

"Sequoya," The 24 8 

Traitor Trapped, A (C. H. Thompson 
vs. The Marine Cooks and Stew- 
ards' Association) 1 8 

Victims of Greed 43 1 

Australian Seamen, Etc. — 

Antipodes, Comment from the 42 3 

Anti-War Resolutions * 3 6 

Australia, A Voice from 35 9 

Australian Government Ships 43 8 

Australian Labor Laws Fail 32 9 

Australian Seamen Gain * 43 6 

Criminal Carelessness * 43 6 

"Fulle of Devvylls" „ 4 2 

Labor Event. A Great 43 3 

Obtaining Results *..:.■ 47 6 

Ships, The Loading of 50 9 

Stewards' Strike in Australia 20 5 

Stuffing the Rolls 51 7 

Working Hours in Australia, 44 12 3 

B 

Babes, Exploiting Our 29 9 

"Ralcatta" Affair, The 43 8 

Better America Federation Barred from 

Schools 22 7 

Blood Money * 15 6 

"Booze," The Question of 17 2 

"Brass Check" Works, The * 39 6 

Britain's Food Supply 32 9 

British Insurance Act, New 37 11 

British Labor Situation 31 2 

British Seamen Idle 46 7 

British Trade Ship * 49 6 

British Wages and H. C. L 31 7 

Brutal Treatment of the Crew of the 

Bkt. "Rolph" * 42 6 

Burden of Unemployment (by Paul S. 

Taylor) 40 11 

Bureaucratic Lawlessness * 37 6 

C 

California State Federation of Labor 

Convention Report 8 2 

"California," The U. S. S 16 5 

California's Problem * (Japanese N 1 6 

"Call," Afore Power to the New York.. 3 11 



TitIe No. Page 

Canadian Shipbuilding * 5 6 

Capital Shows Its Hand * 30 6 

Capitol's Doormat, On the 45 1 

Cause and Effect 14 8 

Check Their Game 27 6 

Chicago Awakens * 22 6 

Children's Confidence Abused * 32 6 

Clipper Bow on Warships 46 9 

Coal and the League * 4 6 

Coal Miners' Attitude, The 14 2 

"Coal Oil Johnny," Exit 22 7 

Coal Profits and Unions (by Milred 

Everett) 28 2 

Coal Strike Settlement 49 9 

Commercial Ruthlessness * 23 6 

Compensation State Fund Makes Good.. 46 3 

Confession of a Faker 12 2 

Congo Has Missing Links 12 11 

Coolie Labor for America * 8 6 

Co-operative Movement, The — 

British Mine Sweepers' Co-operative 

Society * 9 7 

Co-operation in the West * 16 7 

Co-operation Will Cure Them 34 2 

"Co-operative Garibaldi," The (by Cap- 
tain A. Raimondo) 8 8 

Democracy in Industry 40 2 

Economics of Co-operation (by Percy 

Redfern ) 36 9 

banner Labor Bank, A * 9 5 

Fraternal Arrangement, A * 5 7 

Inspiring Interview, An * \2 6 

Costly Pier. A * |8 7 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Alves vs. "Eastern Admiral" 34 7 

British Skipper Vain Trick (Victor 

.Mattes vs. "Wabasha") 37 8 

Case of Salvage, A ("Socony" vs. 

"Comet") 49 k 

Cases of Interest to Seamen 47 8 

Child Labor Law, Court Upsets 52 5 

Compensation Laws for Seamen 5 1 

Important Decision, An (S. S. "Be- 

nowa" ) 38 2 

Interesting Settlement * (S. S. "Di- 
ablo") 17 6 

Judgment Reversed (Frank Brandt vs. 

Schooner "George D. Edmons") 29 1 

Legal Victory, A (Danielson vs. Sigs- 

bee Humphreys Co.) 34 1 

Maritime Workers, Status of 14 1 

Perseverance Rewarded (J. Strelneck 

vs. "West his") 24 7 

Seamen's Accident Insurance 19 1 

Seamen's Act, Sustains 23 2 

Seamen's Right to Discharge 17 1 

Seamen's Rights Sustained (Reading 

Railroad Company vs. Carl A. Berg) 45 8 

"Superior" Claim, Sequel to 21 8 

Supreme Court vs. Civil Liberty 49 2 

Ten Thousand Dollar Verdict, A 

(Proper Medical Attention) 3 1 

"The Seamen's Contract" 12 8 

Watch Your Signing (George V. 
Cohan vs. British and South Amer- 
ican Steam Navigation Company)... 29 7 
Court Scene in Texas 41 9 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-FOUR 



Title No. Page 

D 

Death of Miles Youngberg 20 5 

Death of Mrs. Thomas A. Hanson "... 1 7 

Derelicts * 22 6 

Difficult Task, \ (Salvage of the S. S. 

"Laurentic" ) 37 - 

Dimensions of the U. S 2 10 

Dirigible ZR-2 Wrecked 52 11 

Disappearing Race. A * 14 7 

Disaster. In the Wake of * ( S. S. 

Vlaska") 52 7 

"Dixie," Origin of the 6 11 

Doings in Great Britain * 9 6 

Dollar on the Job * 44 6 

Don't Be a Tramp * 25 7 

Do You Know Them' * 21 6 

Drag Truth to Light * (S. S. "Alaska") SO 6 

] >jc # huis. nf..the peAehft. Staff 3 8 

a??J»M» ?a!4 \ ... \. ;'■. >, •*• 20 1 

Duties Known and Fulfilled 23 7 

Dut\i"and; ReYfloftsifclity'.tby Andrew 

.*•• •.••FtffBseth) .'5. ;./.•.•_;.; H>-7; 20-7; 23-7: 26-7 

>••;.•..'••• • • • * 

E 

Earth's Total Population 51 3 

"Eastland" Disaster. The 43 2 

Economic Factors Analyzed 13 7 

Economic Program of Chili 29 9 

Economist, Gorgas as an 7 2 

Education, Progress of Adult 12 1 

Light-Hour Day in France 46 3 

Eight-Hour Day in French Ships 52 1 

Election of the Delegates to the Twen- 
ty-first Annual Convention of the 

California State Federation of Labor 4 7 

Electricity in Navigation 14 11 

Emigrants Renig * 40 6 

Employers Make Mistake * 48 6 

"Empress of Canada." Launching of.... 1 5 

Ericsson, To Donor 26 2 

Eureka "Labor News" Wins * 31 6 

Europe, Seeing Things in * 2 6 

Explorer Returns. .Voted (Capt. Roald 

Amundsen ) 44 3 

Ex-Service Ideas * 40 6 

F 

Fares and Employers ("The New Free- 
dom's" Lditorial Comment on Mat- 
son Company i 43 6 

Farm, Back to the 13 2 

Farmers' bight Vindicated 45 10 

bate and Ideals (by .1. P. Hayes) 45 2 

Fcrr\ boatmen. The * 16 6 

Financing the 1. W. \V 18 2 

Finland's Growing Fleet 34 2 

Fisheries, Etc. — 

Alaska Fishing Regulations 26 1 

Alaska Fishermen's Contract 35 1 

Atlantic Fishermen's Agreement 15 1 

Fish, Hot and Cold 31 9 

Nova Scotia Fishing 51 3 

Salmon Pro>pect>. Canadian 31 11 

Seal Census, The 15 2 

Whaling in Antarctic * 18 7 

"bloating Fair," Another * 7 6 

Food for Reflection (Incorporation Pa- 
pers of the International Shipping 

Federation, Limited I 50 6 

France, Labor Unions of 51 2 

French Light- 1 lour Day on Ships 52 1 

Fuel-Saving Plan. Big 9 2 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles by, Etc. — 

Duty and Responsibility.. 19-7; 20-7; 23-7; 26-7 
Facts and Figures (Lockout Corre- 
spondence) 39 1 

Message from Furuseth, A 48 6 

Open Shop. The 30 1 

Seaman Injured on Vessel, High School 46 8 

G 

Garibaldi," The Italian "Co-operative (by 

Captain A. Raimondo) 8 8 

( ierman Labor I .aws 49 1 

Herman Shipping Gains 36 7 

( ierman Swedish Trade 22 11 

Germany's Argentine Trade 32 11 

Gorgas as an Economist 7 2 

Gosling's Presidential Address 47 3 

Government liars Unionists 43 5 

Government, Molding the (by Charles 



Title No. Page 

M. Kelly I 37 9 

Greek Shipping Expands 39 9 

Greetings * 23 6 

Gunning Manipulations * 45 (, 

H 

Haiti Speaks 38 9 

Harbors of the Golden Horn 4 8 

Hatfield, Sid. Killed * 51 6 

Health of a Xation. The 42 1 

Hoover Will Investigate * 36 6 

Hope and Faith (by Charles Martelll... 49 8 

Hours of Labor at Sea * 13 6 

How to Measure a River 24 7 

Hudson Bay Railway, The 9 2 

Hurricane Warnings 3 9 



I 



Illustrated by Contrast * 35 6 

Immigration — 

Arriving at Lllis Island, Number of 

Immigrants 1 13 

Emigrants Renig * 40 6 

Emigration, Poverty Breeds (by bred- 
crick C. Howe ) 31 1 

I lead Tax 31 5 

Immigrants Aided by Ship Officials... 15 3 

Immigration and Exploitation 25 3 

Immigration, Canadian 31 2 

Prohibiting Immigration 16 2 

Proposal from Geneva 51 8 

Time for Self-Appraisement * 42 6 

Inchcape's Letter. Lord 26 9 

Indiamen, More * 7 6 

Industrial Democracy!'. What Is 13 1 

Injunctions — 

Courts Usurp Power (by Hon. Wal- 
ter Clark) 33 9 

Injunctions Abused 45 5 

Injunctions Based on Property 21 3 I 

Injunction Dismissed 49 7 | 

Injunctions Restore Feudalism 27 3 

Labor and Injunctions (by Victor A. 

Olander) 50 1 

Supreme Court liars Boycott (Duplex 

Case ) 20 1 

Where Will It End' * (The Duplex 

Case) 20 1 

Insurance, Health * 13 6 

Insurance, Seamen's Accident 19 1 

I nsurance, Workmen's Health 4 2 

International Seafarers' Federation — 

I delegates' Report, The * 1 6 

Forty-eight-hour Week, The 2 1 

Forty-eight-hour Week, The * (Genoa 

Conference) 11 6 

Furuseth, Report by 2 2 

Owners and Seamen to Meet * 12 6 

Pointed Comment * 5 6 

Scharrenberg, Report by r. . 2 2 

Seamen in Conference, World's 1 1 

Seamen's Code. An International 4 1 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Rlood M oney * 15 6 

Convention Call 33 7 

Convention Call (I. S. U. of A.) 6 7 

Convention Proceedings 

21-1; 22-1; 23-1; 24-1: 25-1 

Exploded Theory, An * (Pacific Mail 

Going Out of Business) 3 6 

Facing the Inevitable 46 10 

First Convention of the International 

Seamen's Union of America (by 

James II. Williams) 17 8 

I njunction I dismissed 49 7 

Jailed for Desertion * 51 6 

Jones Act, Protest Against * 2 6 

1 niies Merchant Marine Act (Section 

34) 8 8 

La Follette Seamen's Act. Mr. Har- 
ding on the * 1 7 

Language Test. The * (S. S. "Nan- 
king" Case) 15 6 

lockout Facts Stated 36 1 

Methods Differ * 22 6 

Profits, Huge Shipping 37 7 

Progress of the I. S. C. of A. * 11 6 

Scott Bill (H. R. 3716) 43 2 
Seamen. Canadian (Secretary Han- 
son's Report) 11 2 

Seamen's Act. Attack (Scott Bill) 41 10 

Seamen's Act Protects 32 7 

Seamen's Case, The 38 8 



Titl e No. Page 

Seamen's Law Attacked 36 3 

Section Thirty-four 8 8 

Seeking the Facts (Address by Sena- 
tor La Follette) 48-1; 49-2 

Twenty-fourth Annual Convention of 

the I. S. U. of A. * 17 7 

International Shipping Federation (Ltd.) 

(Incorporation papers) ...50 6 

Intrigue Is International 21 6 

Italian "Co-operative Garibaldi," The 

( by Captain A. Raimondo) 8 8 

Italian Shipping Situation 31 11 

Italy. Happenings in * 8 6 

Italy. The Situation in 7 1 

"It Doesn't Mean Anything" * 29 6 

I. W. W„ Financing the 18 2 

j-K 

Jailed for Desertion * 51 6 

Japan, 1 larmony in * 19 6 

Japanese as Fishermen * 9 6 

Japanese in California * 10 7 

Japanese Labor Awake 19 11 

"Joker" in Gag Act Repeal 45 11 

Jones Act, Protest Against * 2 6 

Jones Merchant Marine Act (Section 34) 8 8 

Journal's Birthday. The * 1 6 

Juggling the Figures 37 11 

L 

Labor, Onward!, Men of 47 9 

Labor, The Department of * 16 7 

Labor. The Department of 28 1 

Labor. Waste and 47 1 

Labor and Injunctions (by Victor A. 

Olander) 50 1 

Labor and the Churches * 19 7 

Labor at Sea, Hours of * 13 6 

"Labor Boss" Brindell 24 10 

Labor Bureau, Inc., Report of the 40 1 

Labor Conditions in Holland 33 2 

Labor Conditions in Russia 5 7 

Labor Day, History of 52 9 

Labor Event, A Great 43 3 

Labor for America, Coolie * 8 6 

Labor I .aws. ( ierman 49 1 

Labor Laws. International 9 1 

Labor Loses a Friend *....". 28 6 

Labor Menace. Chief * 31 7 

Labor Must Lead 49 9 

"Labor Saturday." Municipal 4 9 

Labor Union of France 51 2 

Labor Unions or What? 14 9 

Labor's Non-Partisan Campaign * 6 6 

Labor's Strength, The Test of (by Wal- 
ter Maearthur) 1 7 

La Follette's Address on the Lockout 
Controversy, Senator (Seeking the 

Facts) 48-1; 49-2 

Lake's District Active, Great 43 2 

Language Test, The * 15 6 

1 atvia's Commercial Fleet . . 36 7 

Law and Order * 10 6 

Lawyers Fight in Trial (S. S. "City of 

Norvich") 39 9 

League of Nations * 10 7 

League (if Nations at Work 10 7 

Legal Mind. Views of (by Silas B. 

Axtelli 52 8 

I .egion I s Tabbed 46 2 

Legislation. Necessary * 26 6 

Let Vision Be Wide * 30 6 

Light Where It Is Needed * 47 6 

Living Standards Held Low 38 1 

Lloyd's World's Shipping Statistics 2-7; 7-6 

Locking the Stable * (S. S. "Alaska").. 50 6 

Lockout, Etc. — 

Address Delivered in the L'nited States 
Senate on the Lockout Controversy 
(by Senator Robt. M. La Follette) .48-1 ; 49-2 

Admiral. How They Fooled the 42 8 

Against Stacked Decks 36 10 

Agreement, Renewed 40 9 

American Plan." The 46 9 

Atta Boy! Atlantic * 40 7 

Benson's Bombast, Admiral 37 1 

Benson's Changed Attitude * 37 6 

Benson's Resources Operate * 42 6 

Conciliation (?) 37 7 

Cotter Stan, Case, Joseph 39 9 

Dishonorable Methods 42 11 

Facts and Figures (by Andrew Furu- 
seth) ' 39 1 

Honor to Our Dead 40 8 

Injunction Dismissed 49 7 




55008 



«J*J» 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-FOUR 



Title No. Page 

Is Benson Fair? 35 7 

Learn by Experience * 48 6 

Lockout — See Strikes. 

Lockout Affects (Panama) Canal 47 7 

Lockout Declared at an End 48 7 

Lockout Effects Revealed * 41 6 

Lockout Facts Stated 36 1 

Lockout Items 45 9 

Looking Forward (by Charles Lesse) . 50 8 

More Than Fifteen Per Cent * 38 6 

Notice of Restraining Order (Injunc- 
tion Advertisement) in Marine Lock- 
out 41 13 

Seamen Are Solid 38 10 

"Shipping Register's" Venom * 38 6 

Shipowners Aggressive 40 10 

Ships and American Plan * 47 7 

Squall Breaks, The * 35 7 

Stand by Top'sl Hl'yds! * 34 6 

Strikebreakers, Government Aids 41 11 

Strikebreakers, U. C. Students * 39 6 

Tie-up of Shipping 37 7 

Times Have Changed (by Fred Holtz- 

berg) 47 8 

Transport Workers Awake * 46 1 

Truth and Warning (by Charles Mar- 
tell) 38 8 

Victims of Greed (Funeral of Axel H. 

Ohman) 43 1 

Why Certainly ! * 39 7 

Lumber in Africa 16 10 

M 

Macarthur's, Walter, "The Seamen's 

Contract" 12 8 

"Mayflower" Relics 4 9 

Meeting Called, Important * 30 6 

Membership Rights Defined 50 7 

Merchant Fleet. Denmark's 16 2 

Merchant Marine, Our Growing * 7 6 

Metal Lighter Than Aluminum 2 10 

Mexican Constitution Upheld 43 7 

Mexican Policy, A. F. of L 44 7 

Mexico and Union Labor 50 9 

Miners Defend Mountaineers 22 11 

Miners Give Warning 36 6 

Munchausen Groggy * 46 6 

Mutinous Crew Sinks Ship (S. S. "Hut- 

taita") 32 2 

Mystery of the Sea. A ("Carroll A. 

Deering") 27 11 

N 

Navigation. Electricity in 14 11 

Navy Boys Are O. K. * 29 7 

Navy Seizes Fuel, U. S 2 5 

Negro Boy Honored 18 2 

North Dakota, Good for Nothing * 13 6 

North Dakota, Wealth of 46 9 

Novel Experiment, A 46 3 

O 

( )bserve Your Morals * 20 6 

O. B. U. Stock, Big Slump in * 6 6 

Ocean Buried Treasures 32 9 

Ocean Secrets 30 8 

Oceans Shrinking?, Are the 3 8 

Ocean's Only I nsects 20 9 

Ocean's Tide, Would Stop 2 10 

One Touch of Nature * ("Brocky Alec" 

in Golden Gate Park) 29 6 

Organize * 26 6 

* )r K anize Right * 44 7 

Organized Labor Procrastinates 27 2 

Origin of Long Island 40 7 

i (riginal Experiment, An * 23 6 

P 

Pacific Coast Oil * 4 7 

I 'anama Canal Services 26 2 

Panama Canal, The * 5 6 

Paper vs. Lumber * 10 6 

People's League, Probing 46 2 

Place the Responsibility * (Wreck of 

the S. S. "Alaska") 49 6 

Planes vs. Dreadnaughts 29 2 

Poetry — 

A Famous Victory (by Robert Southcy) 43 9 

At Your Own Terms 45 7 

Benson's Golden Rule 42 7 

Cruise of the "Western Sea" (by Bill 

Hart) 41 8 



Title 



No. Page 



Down to the Sea (by Eugene W. 

Simmonds) 31 9 

Labor Omnia Vincit (by James H. 

Williams) 35 8 

Meditation 47 10 

"Old Summertime" (by James H. Wil- 
liams) 38 8 

Shanghaied Sailors 50 8 

Song of the Wage Slave (by Robert 

W. Service) 45 10 

The Angel of Discontent (by Sam W. 

Foss) 27 7 

The Codrisherman's Lament 21 7 

The Liberty Lady (by Arthur Nan- 

nestad) 43 8 

The Menace 9 2 

The Sailor's Life (by Frank X. Sparks) 26 7 

Under Tropic Skies (by B. Allison) . . 52 9 

Polar Expedition, Capt. Amundsen's ... .4-5; 12-5 

Production vs. Consumption * 12 6 

Profiteering a Crime * 51 7 

Profiteers Escape Under Sales Law (by 

James A. Frear) 30 7 

Profits, Huge Shipping (Report of the 
Labor Bureau, Inc., to the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America). 37 7 

Profits in Shipping 41 11 

Public vs. Private Profit * 2 7 



Radium's L'se in Industry 11 7 

Railroads' Methods Exposed 27 1 

Rate Fixing * 15 6 

"Rate of Exchange," The 7 2 

Real Facts Needed (Trade Relations 

with Soviet Russia) 49 2 

Reason for Complaint (by William T. 

Stark) 50 8 

Reason for Suppression, A * 40 6 

Reform Needed 46 8 

Remedy Suggested 48 8 

Report on Shipowners' Profits (by Labor 

Bureau, Inc.) 37 7 

Research, Valuable ("Carnegie") 29 2 

Red Cross, Seamen and the 10 2 

"Rolph," Brutal Treatment to the crew 

of the * • ■ 42 6 

Russian Labor Movement 50 3 

Russian Recognition, Real 38 7 

Russo-British Trade Agreement 32 1 

Rustic Dream, A * 44 6 



Sabotage in Rear Form * 22 6 

Sabotaged, S. S. "Bakersfield" 40 5 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 



American Plan, The (Steam-Schooner 
Agreement ) 

Challenge Accepted, A * 

Easy Interpretation, An * 

Education in Seamanship * 

Election of Delegates to the 24th An- 
nual Convention of the I. S. U. of A. 

Election of Officers 

Getting Together * 

Improvement Required, An * 

Ingwardsen, R., Elected Assistant Sec- 
retary 

Injunction Dismissed 

Intelligent Effort * 

Labor Omnia Vincit (by James H. 
Williams) 

Lend a Hand * 

Lockout Declared at an End 

On the Job in San Pedro 

Seeing the Light 

Sixth of March *. .'. 

Solidarity * 

Spirit of Men * 

Stand by Top'sl Hal'yds! * 

Steam-Schooner Owners' Proposal... 

Such Is Life * 

Teaching Seamanship * 

To Our Readers * 

Training School 13-7; 14-7; 17-7 

Valedictory (by Editor Scharrenberg) . 

We Cherish Autonomy * 



46 


9 


31 


6 


34 


6 


18 


6 


15 


7 


19 


7 


45 


6 


36 


6 


49 


7 


49 


7 


46 


6 


35 


8 


20 


7 


48 


7 


43 


9 


44 


9 


27 


7 


31 


7 


45 


6 


34 


6 


45 


7 


33 


6 


14 


7 


20 


6 


; 18-6-7 


19 


6 


21 


6 



DECEASED MEMBERS 



Ackerson, Peter 

Andersson, Carl Herman. 
Anderson, Chas. Theo. F. 
Anderson, Chas. Wilson.. 



2 

37 

34 

7 

Anderson, Wilhelm 27 

Andrcasen. Hjalniar 52 



Title No. Page 

Bastion, William Francis 18 7 

Bengtsson, John 28 7 

Bittner, Fred 9 7 

Bredze, Cornelius A 50 7 

Brizga, M ichael 3 7 

Bryning, William 16 7 

Bohley, Harry 27 7 

Burns, Thomas 43 7 

Carson, Edward J 28 7 

Cassberg, Karl Gustaf A 9 7 

Caputo, Salvatore 27 7 

Chilberg, Bennie 48 7 

Ehlert, August 41 7 

Ellison, Isac 20 7 

Erickson, Erick 2 7 

Escb, Joseph N 45 7 

French. Thomas 28 7 

Gamber, Joseph 37 7 

Gronos, John 2 7 

Haederstrom, Torvil F 40 7 

Hansen, Christian 7 7 

Hansen, Johan Gerhard 7 7 

Harvey, James 5 7 

Hawkins, Edward 52 7 

Howard, George W 45 7 

Ibsen, Christian 8 7 

Irmey, Feodor 51 7 

Isacson, John 15 7 

Jackson, William 34 7 

Jensen, Ernest 18 7 

Johansen, Harold W 40 7 

Jobanson. Oscar 28 7 

Johnson, Harry 20 7 

Johnston. Carl Theo 9 7 

Jones. Richard 1 2 7 

Jonaen, Andreas 51 7 

Juell, Ragwald E 30 7 

Koffer,. Alexander 48 7 

Kolod, August 2 7 

Larsen, Karl Sigfried 3 7 

Lawrence, Wm 17 7 

Lax, L T no Edward 3 7 

Leinen, John Wm 12 7 

Lundberg, L 42 7 

Mathisen, Abraham 49 7 

McKenzie, Wm 23 7 

Miller, Johan 37 7 

Miller, Samuel 37 7 

Mitsbel, Alexander 48 7 

Nielsen, Johannes Geo 15 7 

Nogat. Frnest Geo 8 7 

Olsen, Jacob 15 7 

Olson, Peter 49 7 

Olson, John 37 7 

Peterson, John 21 7 

Piehl. Peder 31 7 

Post, Albert 20 7 

Rauer, John R 11 7 

Richards, Clemens 29 7 

Rocke, Gabriel 40 7 

Roth, Sven T 29 7 

Rouvi. Mikkel 29 7 

Rutgerson, Oscar 31 7 

Sandell, Carl 34 7 

Sinclair. William A 24 7 

Scrivens, William 12 7 

Sorenscn, Lauritz Aug 38 7 

Stolzerman, Emil 21 7 

Strandqvist, Louis 51 7 

Trabaudt. Malte Wm. G 10 7 

Tura, Alex 24 7 

Ursen, Alvin 20 7 

Varrio, Nestor 43 7 

Wang, Julius 6 7 

Wall, W 42 7 

W'iman, Frnest 43 7 

Salvage. A Difficult 10 10 

Salvage, Feats of Marine 32 2 

Salving Cold Bars 15 2 

San Francisco — 

Attacking the Initiative * 19 6 

Coming Home to Roost * 26 6 

Disclosed by the Press * 35 6 

Ferryboatmen, The * 16 6 

Intelligent Effort * 46 6 

Is Benson Fair? (Masters. Mates and 
Pilots' Association of the Pacific 

Ignored ) 35 7 

Justice Must Prevail * 24 6 

Keeping Them Busy * 44 7 

Legislation, Direct * 8 7 

Library, Don't Forget the * 8 7 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Associa- 
tion of the Pacific 12 7 

Moonev Case Won't Down 25 7 



I 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-FOUR 



Title No. Page 

Moonoy Frame-up Exposed 11 1 

Peculiar Aspects * 24 6 

Seafarers' Council, The * 14 6 

Sea Power and Seamen * 17 6 

Sinister Trail * 34 7 

Six-Minute Ferry IS 5 

Socialists and Mooney 45 10 

•Star" Suspended, The * 16 6 

Suppression a Failure * 46 7 

Tenacitj Rewarded * 30 6 

Transport Workers Awake * 46 1 

"Scab," Definition of a 41 6 

Scott Kill (H. R. 3716) 43 _ 2 

Sea Level, Area- Below 9 2 

Sea Power and Seamen * 17 6 

Sea Service Bureau (Is This American- 
ism? By Julius Nelson) 48 8 

Sea Training * 6 6 

Seamanship and Efficiency 25 1 

Seamanship, Education in* 18 6 

Seamanship, Modern 28 8 

Seamen, Fashionable * 31 6 

Seamen, Hounding the 44 8 

Seamen, Nationality of 35 

Seamen's Accident Insurance 19 1 

Seamen's Act— See International Sea- 
men's Union of America; also Court 
Decisii ins. 
Seamen and Discipline (by Silas B. 

Axtell) 51 

Seamen and the Red Cross 10 

Seamen in the War. British 14 

Seamen Idle. British 46 

Sedition Bill, Fighl U. S 42 

Serious Revelations * i S. S. "Alaska").. 50 

Shipowners' Sequel . . ■ • 47 

Shipping at Havre 40 

Shipping Board — See United States Ship- 
ping Board. 
Shipping Federation, limited. Incorpora- 
tion Papers of 50 

Shipping Gains, Herman 36 

Shipping Grafl Disclosed 41 

Shipping Profits. Huge (also see I 'runt si 37 

Shipping, Progress of U. S 4 

"Shipping Plot," The Herman ( ' 

Ships Increase. American 49 

Shu,, Committee. The (" Rockefeller 

Plan") 8 

Soldiers. Effects of War on 44 

Solidarity, For (by Ralph V. Chervin).. 44 

Sauce for the Gander * 28 

Soviet Russia. Five Weeks in 

14-7; 15-7; 16-7; 

Soviets in Italy 4 

Stand by Top's! Hal'yds! * 34 

Steamboat Inspection Service, The 16 

Steel Trust's Weak Spot, The * 14 

Stop It Now (A. M. Arneson vs. 

"Rolph") 41 

Strike, British Coal Miners' * 

Strike. British Coal Miners' (Doings in 

Great Britain *) 9 

Strike, The Ancient Hunger 9 

Strike, The General 10 



6 

7 

10 
7 
7 
7 
8 

1 
1 

9 
6 

17-7 
2 
6 
1 
6 

7 
7 

6 

1 
1 



Title No. Page 

Strikebreakers, U. C. Students * 39 6 

Subsidies, British Shipping 49 8 

Subsidies. French 35 9 

Suggestions. Worth While 2 7 

T 

Tale of Hard l.uck. A 47 2 

Tale of Terrorism, A (by Arne M. 

Arneson ) 41 1 

Tales from an Old Sea. Old 48 9 

Taxation, Single Tax, Etc. — 

I lead Tax 31 5 

Land Question, The Eternal (by ller- 

| Atkinson I 7 7 

Sales Tax Is Xo Panacea 40 3 

Single Tax. Scoffing at the 20 2 

Tax, Big "Biz" Opposes Profits 39 3 

Tax on Idle Land. Xo 2 10 

Tax on Land Values 2 10 

Taxes, Wars and 10 6 

Teachers Awakening 33 7 

Teredo, Lighting the 23 11 

'They Won't Stay * 44 6 

Three Hundredth Anniversary, The 

( 1 .anding of the Pilgrims ) 3 8 

Three-Shift System. The 23 2 

Timber. Ownership of 17 2 

Timber Workers' Union * (Law and 

Order*) 10 6 

Time to Take Heed * (Senator Borah 

Assails American Legion) 52 6 

Tipping Evil, The * 13 6 

Tobacco Xext , Is 14 9 

"Tonnage," Origin of the Term 24 7 

"Transport Workers Awake * 46 1 

U 

Unemployment * 32 6 

Unemploymenl a Reward of Victory (by 

J. Ford) ' 52 2 

Unemployment, Burden of (by Paul S. 

Taylor) 40 11 

Unemployment Problems 11 2 

Unionism, "Scientific'' * 16 6 

Unionism, Growth of Trade 33 1 

Unionism "The" Remedy * 14 6 

Unions, Old vs. "New Form" 18 7 

Union or Lad', Hood (by George Soule) 42 2 
Union Ship. A Real ("Brescia" of the 

Italian Garibaldi Line) 7 8 

"Union Shop." The * 3 7 

L". S. Navy Seizes Luel 2 5 

United States Shipping Board — 

Admiral Benson's Appeal 13 2 

Admiral Benson's Seal].. After * 7 6 

Altering 25 Steamers 14 5 

Benson Advises * 29 7 

Damage to Shipments 13 5 

Deficiency Appropriations * 13 7 



Title No. Page 

Extensive Report. An (by Joseph X. 
Teale, Commissioner of Operations 

of the U. S. Shipping Board) 2X 11 

Japs Outwit Shipping Board 52 11 

I. aid-up Vessels at Southampton Bay 

13-5; 14-5 

Oil, Tin Demand for 12 7 

Operating Expenses, Pacific 11 5 

Shipping Board Muddle, The * 11 6 

Squall Breaks. The * 35 7 

Timely Resolve. A (International Mer- 
cantile Marine Company regarded by 
the U. S. Shipping Board as inimical 
to and not in harmony with policy 

of the United States of America.... 2S 7 

V 

Valedictory (by Editor Scharrenberg) . . . 19 6 

Vitus from Aberdeen 49 9 

Vikings. Shades of the * 25 6 

Vocabulary, Some 12 2 

Voyage. An Unusual 5 11 

W 

War Appropriations * 18 6 

Warships, Clipper Bow on 46 9 

Washington Letter, Our (by Laurence 
Todd) — See issues 1 to 52. 

Waste and Labor 47 1 

Watch Them Grow * 25 7 

Water Power. 'The Use of 14 9 

Weather Bureau, A Mid-Pacific * 10 6 

Where Are We Drifting? * 34 6 

Where Will It End? * (Duplex Case).. 20 6 

Where's the Normalcy?* 25 6 

Widow's Right, A 46 6 

Wireless Rules, British 12 2 

"Wobblies," Perfidy of the 6 2 

Women as Wage-earners * 17 6 

Women Magistrates 2d 9 

Women Make Laws. Where 45 11 

Women to End War, Working 52 9 

Woodrow Wilson * (An Appreciation of 

the Man) 27 

Work to Perform. A * 33 6 

Workers Awake. Transport * 46 1 

Workers. The L'norganized * 13 7 

Working Hours, Portuguese 20 -' 

World's Debt. The '. IS 11 

Would Exploit Misery 48 3 

Wrecks — 

Alaska 49 6 

A rakan 1 5 

Atlas 17 5 

H. C. Lindauer 13 5 

Governor 31 5 

Inoa 16 5 

Joan of Arc 12 5 

Klamath 23 7 

\lar\ E. I 'aimer 1 14 

Newark 10 5 

Prince Rupert 10 5 

W. J. Pirrie •....' 13 5 



I 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization 



\ OL. XXXIV, No. 1. 



SAX FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8. 1020. 



Whole No. 1717. 



WORLD'S SEAMEN IN CONFERENCE 



Delegates Representing The I. S. U. of A. Submit Report 



Secretary Hanson of the International 
Seamen's Union of America lias supplied 
the Journal with a copy of the official 
report made by the delegates who have 
just returned from Europe after attending 
two international conferences of seamen. 

The report is published in full, in this 
issue. Two supplementary reports, dealing 
with conditions of seamen and the status 
of seamen's organizations in certain north- 
ern European countries, will appear in next 

week's issue. 

In perusing these reports it should be 
home in mind — first, last and all the time 
— that the great, right for the freedom of 
seamen, carried on by the organized sea- 
men of America for over twenty years 
hefore it was won, has now been made 
"the" fight for the seamen of the world. 



Thomas A. Hanson, Secretary-Treasurer, 

International Seamen's Union of America, 
Chicago, III. 

Dear Comrade: 

The report of the delegates elected by our 
recent annual convention to attend the biennial 
meeting of the International Seafarers' Federa- 
tion must, for the sake of clarity, deal with 
three international conferences, namely: 

1. The Open International Conference of Sea- 
farers which met at Genoa. Italy, from June 
10 to 14. 

-.. The International Labor Conference held 
under the auspices of the League of Nations 
to consider the problems of seamen. This 
conference met at Genoa, beginning on June 15. 

3. The constitutional meeting of the Inter- 
national Seafarers' Federation which convened 
at Brussels, Belgium, on August 9. 

A detailed report upon the Open International 
Conference of Seafarers was previously prepared 
and has been published in the issue of the 
Journal, dated July 21. Immediately following 
said conference came the meeting held under 
the auspices of the League of Nations. Tins 
gathering had to consider the following ques- 
tions affecting seamen: 

First. Hours of labor; fa) in inland naviga- 
tion, lb) in ocean navigation. 

Second. The employment of children on ships. 

Third. The questions relating to seamen's 
employment, engagement and signing of ship- 
ping articles. 

Fourth. The possibility of drafting a code 
for seamen to have equal application and force 
in all countries. 

It should be noted that at this conference the 
method of representation hail very serious dis- 
advantages to the seamen. Each nation had 



four delegates, of which two were appointed 
by the government, one by the shipowners and 
one by the seamen. Thus the seamen had one 
vote out of each four. 

This meeting had two ways of expressing the 
results of its deliberations. It could make 
recommendations to the different nations to en- 
act legislation — but the nations were in no 
manner bound to act upon these recommenda- 
tions. Again, the meeting could submit to the 
different nations a so-called "draft convention," 
i. c., a treaty made ready to he adopted by the 
nations. This treaty the nations are supposed 
to adopt as a duty. 

On the question of the employment of children 
the meeting adopted a "draft convention" pro- 
hibiting the employment of children under the 
age of fourteen, hut with certain rather sweep- 
ing exceptions. 

Hours of Labor. 

Tn the matter of "hours of labor" the meeting 
adopted a recommendation dealing only with 
hours of labor in inland navigation to the effect 
that those nations which have not yet pro- 
vided by legislation for an eight-hour day and 
a forty-eight hour week should do so at the 
earliest opportunity. 

Dealing with the hours of labor at sea the 
meeting drafted, but failed to adopt a "draft 
convention" because the two-third majority 
necessary to adopt were not obtained. 

On the question relating to seamen's employ- 
ment, etc., a "draft convention" was adopted 
providing for unemployment benefit if such un- 
employment results from "loss or foundering" 
of the vessel. In such cases the benefit is not 
to exceed two months' w-ages. This benefit is 
to be obtained from "the owmer or person with 
whom the seaman has contracted." The ex- 
pression here used indicates a purpose to change 
the old and now existing rule of contracting 
with the vessel and to adopt in its place a 
contract with the owner to go in any one of 
the owner's vessels. 

In addition to the foregoing a recommenda- 
tion to the different nations was adopted that 
each "should establish for seamen an effective 
system of insurance against unemployment aris- 
ing out of shipwreck or any other cause." 

The Employment Shark. 
Finally a "draft convention" was adopted 

regulating and prohibiting "the business of find- 
ing employment for seamen" under penalty of 
criminal punishment. There is, however, no 
criminal or other penalty against the operation 
of blacklisting employment agencies such as 
have from time to time been maintained by 
shipowners. (This question was deall with later 
at the Brussels conference of the International 
Seafarers' federation.) 

If the two last named "draft conventions" 
and the recommendation relating to unemploy- 
ment should be accepted, shipowners would have 
more complete control of seamen while on shore 
than they now have over seamen while at sea. 
Employment offii i uch as those conducted by 



the Lake Carriers' Association and the Inter- 
national Shipping federation, Limited, would 
he the only places through which the seaman 
could find employment. While it is true that 
the "draft conventions" guarantee freedom of 
choice of vessels the unemployment benefit 
would by its very nature compel men to go on 
\essels or "contract with owners," not as a 
matter of choice but from sheer necessity. It 
might be harsh to say that such is the under- 
lying purpose, but the conference had many 
members who knew the seamen's life in all its 
aspects and who have given years of effort to 
attain such control over seamen while on shore. 
An International Seamen's Code. 

< »n the question "consideration of the possi- 
guilty of drawing up an International Seamen's 
Code" the meeting decided in the affirmative 
and made the following recommendation: 

"In order that, as a result of the clear and 
systematic codification of the national law in 
each country, the seamen of the world, whether 
engaged on ships of their own or foreign 
countries, may have a better comprehension of 
their rights and obligations, and in order that 
the task of establishing an International Sea- 
men's ('ode may be advanced and facilitated, 
the International Labor Conference recommends 
that each Member of the International Labor 
Organization undertake the embodiment in a 
seamen's code of all its laws and regulations 
relating to seamen in their activities as such." 

As a preliminary step in the drafting of an 
International Code the different nations had 
reported upon existing penalties for disobedience 
and violation of contract. After a study of tin se 
reports the representatives of the Norwegian 
seamen submitted the following resolution: 

"Whereas: The International Labor Office 
report on the Seamen's Code exposes two vital 
and important facts; first, that in all countries 
represented at this Conference the seamen's 
status is little better than that of the serf, and 
second, that none of these countries seem to 
he prepared, at this Conference, to change this 
ancient status; and 

"Whereas: The information furnished by the 
different countries indicates that the contract 
of the seamen is in a moral sense no contract, 
because neither the obligations nor the penalties 
for their violations are the same upon the two 
contracting parties -the penalty upon the ship- 
owner being one ol regulated damages, the 
penalty upon the seamen one of compulsion to 
continue to labor against his will, or, penal 
servitude, the duration of which is likewise 
regulated by law, and 

"Whereas: Such great inequality before tin 
law cannot be tolerated in .i world that has 
been 'made safe for democracy'; therefore he it 

"Resolved: in.it this commission r.ecommi 
to the various Governments that seamen he 
placed upon the same legal level as shipowm 
through the repeal of all laws and the abroga- 
ti m of all treaties under which the seaman tl 
he compelled to labor against his will when 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Ihe \ essel is in safety, 01 uffi eration 

i fulfil a civil to labi >r, 

"Genoa, 24th June, 19 

"i S ; >car Nilsen, 

" i Signed ) 1 Iji. Johannessen, 
"( Signed I H. M ichels 
The foregoing resolution was' discussed in 
committee and finally came into erence 

:is a minority report. Mr. Colmo ( Argentine) 
directed attention to the abs< rinciples to 

guide the commission entrusted with the writing 
of the code. Mr. Nolens (Netherlands) indi- 
cated very plainly that he was desirous of 
having the substance oi ilution adopted, 

undo efforts to prevent considers 
lidii (.i the minority but all failed. 

il strong expressions of dis- 
approval, especially of the word "serf' J in the 
Norwegian resolution. 

An Historic Address. 
Mr. Johannesen of Norway, through Mr. 
Thorsen then submitted the following remarks: 
"Gentlemen: A resolution like the one we 
Norwegian Seamen's representatives havi 

; was adopted in Norway IS months 
iy a meeting of the several ratings ol sea- 
men — re] i ind members. 
"This resolution was submitted to the Nor- 
overnment and the Premier, Mr. Gun- 
nar Knuil- if Norway's greatest 
shipowners, said thai he could not see any 
good reaso ontinuation of the old status 
under which seamen live and labor. lie said 
thai In- hoped to see it abolished before the 
sittii amenl adjourned. 

"Norway, Denmark and Sweden have now 
sitting a joinl commission whose duty it is to 
propose to the three countries such changes in 
the present law as shall bring the law into 
harmony with modern ideas. 

"The foreman of the Norwegian section of 
the joint commission submitted thi resolution 
. the Commissions in Septi 
a later i held in Sweden the 

of the Norwegian section again called 
attention t>> the resolution and expressed the 
hope that tin- principle in the resolution would 
ide the guiding idea in the framing of the 
law. 
"tin pages 69, 70 and 71 of Report 4, en the 
Seamen's (ode we find that the Government 
,,f l i. .nee ahead) in 191 I i suit of a < Ion 

entatives of the Go 
iiient. the shipowners and th i had sub 

mined a propo .il to the Ft em h Parliament 

to the effi I I that the seamen's status be 

changed. The proposal is that the seaman may 
terminate his contract in any safe harbor upon 
giving notice which, in accordance wit 1 
safety of the vessel and the passengers, is from 
two id twelve hours. 

"As bases to i olution we have taken 

the reports from the different nations as the 
reports appear in Report No. 4. In this 
we find that the seaman (nobody is a seaman 
until he has signed the shipping articles) who 
dues nut render himself on board at the time 
hi. il the master SO desires, he taken on 
board by force with or without police assi 
W e find also that if the seaman has deserted 
or escaped from the vessel (it is only prisi 
serfs and seamen who escape, others simply 
quit their work), the master may cause him 
to be arrested, brought before a court and to 
be sentenced to imprisonment. We find further 
that these laws do not exist for the protection 
of seamen as a body or fur the protection nf 
societj as such, hut fur the protection of 

such shipowners as may desire to use thi 

"Well, gentlemen, the seaman's status and 

the penalties he incurs in seeking to withdraw 

himself from the service ol the vessel are as 
follows: he is compelled to labor against his 
will or to suffer imprisonment if he seeks to 
break or dues break his contract to 
hut the master as representative <^i the owner 
ancel the contract at any time or place 
by paying as civil damai aman from 

i me to three months' w . he I an d( i this 

although he can find no legal ground under 

which the seam, in may he dismissed and if the 

damages are nut paid there is no prison 
) fur eithei thi master or the uumer ol" 
the vessel. I respectfully submit this to the 
jurists present and ask them if this he equality 
before the law. 
"I ask the representatives of the different 
- if these laws are based upon democratic 
principles and if it he in this manner that they 
are going to fulfil the promises which were 
made to the seaman when he freelj 
life fur the world's and to bring 

to tin hungry during the late world-war' We 
cannot believe that this Conference, which is 
called fur the protection of seamen, can vote 
t this resolut 
There will he tl 

c word in this resolution— the word 
serf. If you can find another word, which gives 
an accurate definition of th n's status, 

r w oi d may hi used, hut I again 
to the jurists to tell this meeting the 
difference between the man who could nut leave 

late and the seaman who i 
leave the vessel in irbpr? What is the 

difference, if there be one. between the penal- 
ties imposed upon the disobedient serf or the 



1 1 ni'l those impo >ed upi >n the 'amen 
who fail to i ibey in the safe harboi I hei e 

are n 10 seetll tO think that we Si 

cannot understand and Feel our status — that we 
cannot feel the difference in the I 
exists between us and the shipo> With 

ence to this point permit me to say that 
it might have keen true many years ago: but 

I have sailed I have often h 
say '1 hi lin sold myself in plai 

saying '1 have slopped again.' This 1 think 
is a sufficient answer. There are especially 
fs1 shipowners men who say: 'Yes, hut 
you do ni to sign the contract if you 

do not like to.' To this I answer that when 
Esau came from the hunt and v 

he asked his brother for food the brother 
answered: 'Yes; if yon will give to me your 
right as the firstborn.' Esau was hungry and 

the bargain was transacted. Thus did Esau 
become his brother's serf. 
"Finally I beg to remind you that tin 
ol thi si w as of no value as a 
his master unless it was corroborated either 
through the testimony of others, or through 
facts which came out during the trial. The 
ice of a seaman against the vessel, the 
tier or the master is sometimes 
of the same value. We know this from our 
experience before consuls and courts. 

"These laws which compel the seaman to 
work against his will must be repealed and 

miaii must he treated as Other men when 
tin \.ssel is safe. Anything less than this 
will gradually make it impossible to yet self 
at sea." 

Mr. de Rousiers (France) offered the follow- 
ing motion on the subject: 

"Criminal procedure shall only be resorted to 
with a view to upholding public regulations 
which govern the articli 

ind -fill only he entered upon at the 
request of officials of the public authorities; 
civil procedure only shall protect agreements 

freely entered into between seamen and the 

representatives of the ship on which they have 
embarked." 

Mr. Colmo (Argentine) complimented the 
itv upon having the courage of its 
mictions. Me could nut agree with Mr. de 
Vis. 

Mr. Ciigliu (Italy) then offered the follow- 
ing motion: 

"This Conference, after hearing the conclusion 
of the minority i ing from the commission 

for the study of an International Seat 

Code, affirms the principle of the must com- 
plete equality on the judicial and social | 
between the rights of the seamen and the i 
of the shipowni 

The Sei ueral after some remarks 

moved that the motions offered by Mr. de 

Rousiers and by Mr. Giglio he adopted and 

d to the drafting committee to combine 
i lie two and submit a report. Thi - 
d to. 
Later the drafting committee submitted the 
following: 

Text of the Drafting Committee. 
"This Conference recognizes that the contr: 
of engagement of seamen in all countries con- 
two kinds of clauses: 

(1) clauses of a public character, inserted 

in the public interest; 

( 2) clauses ol a pri\ ai i 

in the private interests of shipowners 
or seamen or uoth. 

"The ( onference affirms the principles 

(1) that so far as possible the clauses of 

a public character in seamen's con- 
tract- should I"- the same in the differ- 
ent countries; 

thai tin- legal rights and 
of seamen and shipowners, inter se, 
arising out of th ni a private 

character, should he placed upon a 
footing of strict equality ; 
1 3 1 that violations of pn ivisions in 
tracts uf engagement between 
and employers should not be dealt 
with as criminal offenses, unless they 
be violations of the clauses of a public 

character maintaining public policy as 
distinguished from private interest, and 

even then only at tile instani I ol 

public authorities. 

(4) that violations of provisions in con- 

meiit sin mid he made 

the subject <d' procedure in. civil courts 
only where such contracts have been 

freely entered mtu mi both sides. 

therefore invites tl 
national Labor Office, in its investigations pre- 
For the establishment of an International 
Seamen's Code dealing with contracts uf en 

nent and discipline, to keep in view the 

application of the foregoing principles, and to 

embody thi at as possible in any drafts 

international code on either uf these snl>- 

which it may place before future met 

of the International Labor Conference." 

When the revised draft was reported tu 

i ia e M r. Barlow ( < ireal Britain ) stated 
that he had nut seen the document before, that 
it referred tu very important questions 



of lie- t, and thai he would therefore 

■ it. 
ise<l draft, as submitted herewith, was 
then adopted with onlj nwr dissenting vote. 
Befqre disposing of the subject matter Mr. 
ime i submitted the full,, wing for 
adoption by the conference: 

['luvisiuns in contract of engage- 
ment can never he considered as a criminal 

e. nor can the abandonment of the 
in a foreign port he considered as desertion, 
and therefore can nut be punished as crime." 
["his declaration was approved by 41 in 

linst. 
The foregoing briefly tells the story of the 
conference under the auspices <<i the I 
Of t> i. 

Call for Brussels Meeting. 

When it became fairly well understood that 
the meeting would he a failure on very ii 
tanl questi ins, such as the hours ( ,f labi 
sea, tin need for a meeting of seamen to voice 
seamen's thoughts upon the actions of the 
meeting, was felt tu he imperative. As 
nit uf this feeling the President and Secre- 
tary-Treasurer ol the International Seafarers' 
ration issued the following call to meet 
il Brussels: 

ni, 22nd Tune 1920. 
Dear Sir and Brother: 

A Secretariat meeting ui the International 
Seafarers' Federation will he held at Brussels 
on VugUSl 5th at 11 a. m., and on Align 
a Coi ill he held at 11 a. m. 

\t the Secretariat meeting on the 5th only 
those who are on the Secretariat will he 
present. On the 9th there will he a lull 
i ess uf the delegates representing the dif- 
ferent I'm 

Should you desire tu submit any ' 
tu the Congress Would von he good enough 

olutions at your earliest 
sible convenii 

s fraternally, 

C. DAM", 

General Secretary, 

After waiting some time for the final action 

of the Conference on the Norwegian proposal 

ade arrangements to have ent to 

Norway and we left Genoa to visit and confer 

with the different I'niuns in Belgium. Holland, 

Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Norway pend- 

and in | n fur the meeting in 

Brussels. Germany, Holland and Belgium were 
: i .incut allotted to Conine! nherg 

and he will report separately thereon. Den- 
mark and Sweden to Carlson and Furuseth. 
ay to Furuseth. A supplementary report 
is submitted <>u these missii 

The Brussels Convention. 

In ce with the official "('all" the 

International Seafarers' federation was called 

to order in regular biennial >n at 

Brussels, Belgium, on August 9, 1920. The 

MS were held in the banquet hall of the 
Metropolr Hotel located in the heart of the 
city. 

Monsieur Wauters, Minister of Labor of Bel- 
gium, and Monsieur I'ierrard. representing the 
Minister of Marine of Belgium, delivered ad- 
s ,,f welcome. President rlavelock Wil- 
son responded in appropriate terms. 

The Committee on Credentials reported 45 
Us entitled tu .seats in the convention, 
as follows: 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Union of 

Britain and Ireland. (IS votes) R. 

Breckenridge, I. II. Borlase, G. Jackson, C. 

Bellem, I. Cone, I >. Flett, W. R. Spence, M. 

Tearle, T. Chambers and E. Cathery. 

National Union <>i Ship Steward-, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, (5 votes) Jus. Cotter, \. 
Despres, W. R. Smailes, 'I'. Donnelly and E, 
\ ernlinden, 

Hull Seamen's Union, (2 votes') G, W. Mc- 
Kee and John Atkinson. 

United Kingdom Pilots' Association, (2 votes) 
M. Joyce. 

nch Seamen's hen ) A. 

Rivelli, l onis Reaud, Eugene Ehlers, Leon Bao- 
Vugeste Mom. liter, Fran- 

cis Mouilli and Simon Mattei. 

International Seamen's Union of America, (12 
votes) \iidnw furuseth. Paul Scharrenberg and 
Carlson. 

Belgian Seamen's Union, (3 votes) J. Cha- 
pellc. C. Mahhnan, II. Dillen and W. Schon- 
l.erem. 

Seamen's Union uf Holland, (3 votes) D. L, 
Wolfson, D, Litzau and f. Verhagen. 

Norwegian Sailors' and firemen's Union, (3 
votes) Conrad Stensrud, Gerhard Johansen and 
Idar Hamsaas. 

of Bergen. (2 votes) ( llaf 
Andersen ami Sigvard Olsen. 

Swedish Firemen's Union, (-' votes) Seen 
'. .undgren. 

Swedish 

( iriph. 

I hinish 

I ensen. 

Danish Cooks and Stewards' Union, i -' votes) 
Iv Spliid. 
President Havelock Wilson in his openini 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



Sailors' Union, (3 votes) f.rhard 
ireincii 1 in: n (2 votes) RlC h lid 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Edison Is Advised 

Hugh V. Reilly, late editor of the New- 
ark Ledger, advises Thomas Edison, elec- 
trical wizard, to study industrial conditions 
in his own factories in this vicinity before 
he criticizes workers and gives advice to 
them. 

Recently Mr. Edison declared that il 
the industrial worker could be made to 
understand "what capital and management 
are doing for him it would go a long way 
to cure this so-called unrest." 

"The press accounts of the address," 
says Labor Editor Reilly, "agree that it 
was delivered for Mr. Edison and not by 
him. 

"Perhaps it was not written or dictated 
by him, because the thought expressed is 
unworthy of a great man. It bears all the 
characteristics of hired management mis- 
representation. Several months ago we 
Spoke of the Ion- established practice of 
the West Orange plant of hiring workmen 
in a large field. We said at the time that 
almost invariably the future founder of a 
hyphenated-American family would get the 
job. There have been other instances 
when the Edison management have made 
a more direct appeal for foreign workmen 
in preference to the native born, as was 
the case during the Polishers' strike sev- 
eral years ago. At that time the strike- 
breaking advertisements distinctly stated 
that Creeks were preferred for the strikers' 
places. 

"And now Mr. Edison wonders why the 
industrial worker does not understand his 
employer. Many workmen in our large 
industrial establishments are incapable ot 
understanding their employers for the same 
reason that the steel trust experienced in 
their strike last fall — the employer didn't 
want workmen who can understand. The 
fact is, the American workman understands 
his employer far better than the latter 
understands him. The workman is seeking 
through the agency of collective bargain- 
ing to make that understanding all em- 
bracing, but many employers (the Edison 
companies included) have given repeated 
evidences that they do not want it. 

"The attitude of these companies indi- 
cates they desire the very opposite of un- 
derstanding — oppression. Oppression never 
develops that full, hearty co-operation nec- 
essary to a better world. 

"Mr. Edison should study the industrial 
conditions in his own factories before he 
criticizes the workmen of today." 

Public Has Duties 

"Before the public has a valid claim for 
the full recognition of its rights on the 
part of labor, it must have previously as- 
sumed its responsibilities and have done 
its part in preventing conditions of labor 
which are not only intolerable to labor, 
but which are a menace to the stability 
and welfare of the Nation itself," says 
John 1'. ITcy, editor International Molders' 
Journal. 

"The public," says this trade unionist, 
"manifested little interest in the long hours 
and low wages of street car employes, until 



one morning it was forced to walk down 
town because the street car employes would 
no longer endure the intolerable conditions 
of their employment. 

"The miners have received such small 
wages that they could not support their 
families in decency. They have been pre- 
vented from organizing by bands of hired 
mercenaries whose existence has been per- 
mitted by the authorities; their members 
and their organizers have been killed in 
cold blood, but the public took no adequate 
steps to prevent these outrageous and un- 
American conditions. 

"But the public, which had so effectively 
evaded and ignored its responsibilities, 
clamored for legislative and administrative 
relief the moment the miners went on 
strike. 

"The public, in respect to its rights, is 
very much like many employers who are 
keenly conscious of their rights, but over- 
look or waive aside the reciprocal rights of 
their employes. 

"The foundryman who expects the mold- 
ers and coremakers to work' for him with 
the spirit of good will must have indicated 
a spirit of fairness and good will towards 
his employes, for there are no rights en- 
joyed by men which do not carry with 
them equivalent obligations and responsi- 
bilities." 

Mr. Wood Predicts 

William M. Wood, president of the 
American Woolen Company, predicts a 
drop in the price of men's clothing. lie 
wants it understood that he means "cloth- 
ing," and not "cloth." His concern manu- 
factures cloth and the price of this com- 
modity will not be lowered. lie says the 
company's mills have been closed because 
of a lack of orders, and he can not say 
when they will be opened. 

There was nothing in the interview to 
indicate that the workers are not produc- 
ing enough, and that this is the cause for 
high prices. Now he blames the dealer. 
The dealer, of course, will blame the 
woolen trust. 

The New York World makes this edi- 
torial comment on the statement by Presi- 
dent Wood of the American Woetlen Com- 
pany that the price of clothing will be 
reduced, but that the price of cloth will 
not be reduced : 

"Thick-headed consumers have supposed 
that the price of clothing bore some rela- 
tion to the price of cloth. If they are 
not now convinced of their delusion it is 
not the fault of the president of the wool 
trust." 



Railroads Now Favor Economy 
Since railroad rates have been increased 
rail managers and financial oracles have 
changed their tune. 

Before the advance the public was as- 
sured that higher rates were necessary to 
save the roads from the junk pile. In a 
public statement President Compers de- 
clared that the solution was not in in- 
creased rates, but rather in a return to the 
(Continued on Page 9.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 
355 North Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. \Y. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg.. Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South 
Australia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockbampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand. Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Seemansvereeniging, St Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Internationale Transportarbeiter - Federation. 
Engelufer, 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
VVedels plads, 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Longgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade, 15 Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 

Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 

Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Centrale Bond van Transportarbeiders, Hoofd- 
bestuur, 's Gravendykwal 111 te Rotterdam. 

Vakgroep Zeelieden, Pelikaanstraat 25, 
Rotterdam. 

AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S. Marcellino 6-2, Italy. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle In- 
glaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinbeiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Kmpregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedictino« 18. Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road^ 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



r~ 


♦ 


World's Workers 


i 


— »> 



Premier Lloyd George stated in 
the House of Commons that the 

Government was expecting much an- L 
employment during the coming win- 
ter and was considering pri 
tionary measures. 

A strike of Montreal organized 
barbers followed the refus; I 
ph. vers to accept a wage rat 
$25 a week and 50 per cent, of 
earnings when they exceed $35 a 
week. 

Strain engineers employed bj th ■ 
Dominion Power and Transmission 
Company havi in- 

creases. The new rates range 

to >S4 cents an houf for a 60- 
hour week, as against anges 

of 40 to 65 cents. 

The Canadian Trades and I 
Congress will hold its annual con 
vention in Windsor. Ontario, begin- 
ning Mo ptember 13. The 
■ess is a legislative body and 
is composed of trade unions affili- 
ated with the American Federation 
of Labor. 

I.ahor exchanges established by 
the British government is a source 
of complaint by the workers. It is 
stated that the men in charge of 
these exchanges, and wh.0 deal with 
workers seeking employment, 
no grasp of industrial conditions 
nor sympathetic understanding of the 
men and women with win mi tin;, 
have to deal. 

The Khilafat committee, chief or- 
gan of the radical workers in India, 
has sent out a manifesto urging a 
general strike and a boycott against 
Great Britain. The manifesto points 
out the great need of enlisting the 
peasants in the movement bi 
there can he any hope of SUC( 
India being almost exclusively an 
agricultural country. 

A conflict has arisen between the 
theatrical impresarios of Madrid and 
the members of the orchestras, act- 
ors and other employes of the thea- 
ters. The impresarios decline to 
recognize the theatrical empl 
syndicate, of which nearly all thosi 
connected with the theaters are 
memb< rs. I )ne theater has 
without an orchestra for si 
nights. In the event that the 
agers maintain their determined at- 
titude against the actors' syndicate, 
many theaters will be compelled to 
close and the coming season's suc- 
cess is menaced. 

A widespread strike of railway 
workers on the Northwestern Rail- 
way has paralyzed traffic in North- 
ern India. Approximately 20,000 

men are out, including skilled and 
unskilled workers. Principal centers 
affected by the strike are: Karachi. 
Multan. Amritsar, Ferozepur, l.jud- 
liiana, Wazaribad, Lyallpur, 
Musa and Lahore, The general pub- 
lic is showing sympathy with the 
strikers, hut big business interest 
such as the Timber Merchants' As- 
sociation, a lumber trust of Jhelum 
and similar organizations, have re- 
quested the government to inter- 
Strikers have shown their 
international vision by cabling to 

1 I indon, asking tin- SUppi Ml of the 

National Union of Railway-men 
requi Iritish railway workers 

to Parliament. The demand 
strikers are as follows: 1. Recogni- 
tion of their union. 2. Re install- 
ment of all men on strike in their 
final appointments. 3. forma- 
tion of conciliation boards. 4. Rail- 
way authorities to guarantee as a 
minimum an increase of 75 per cent. 
in wages. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florslnim and Douglas Shoes 

\n<\ the IW-st in Oil Clothing ami Boots 

See them at M BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529'/ 2 BEACON STREET. SAN PEDRO. CAL 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, is the ideal place. Captain Frerichs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under hii undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 



Steamboat Inspectors 



TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



OrViRKERSUNIC 



For Twenty Years we 1, | tlii.s Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 

Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 

I lit i 1 1 ion 

Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
i ', ompt i leliveries to i dealers and r 

18 to Workers and Em- 

ploj 
Prosperity of shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union nun and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLLIS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE. General Secretary-Treasurer 



UNiowftrAMP 




IS INDEPENDENCE 
YOUR GOAL? 

If you spend less than you earn, and save the 
difference, you are on your way to independence. 

WORK AND SAVE 

must be part of the plan — safe investmenl another 

INVEST YOUR SAVINGS 

in 

GOVERNMENT SAVINGS 
SECURITIES 

PRICES IN JUNE 

Thrift Stamps at Twenty-five Cents 

% 5 Government Savings Stamps for * ii; 

$100 Treasury Savings Certificates for 

$1000 Treasury Savings Certificates for 



FOR SALE AT BANKS AND POST OFFICES 



GOVERNMENT LOAN ORGANIZATION 

SECOND FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICT 

120 Broadway - - - New York 



INFORMATION WANTED 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Will 11. Peterson and G. Johnson, 
Formerly winchmen of S. S. "Carmel" 
to communicate with J. T. Smith, 

i 411. 11.' Market St., San I 
cisco. 9-8-20, 



A. Jacobsen, formerly vvinchman. 
Steamer "Phyllis." Please communi- 
with J. T. Smith, Room 411, 
112 Market Street, San Francisco. 

8-18-2(1 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. G. SwanRon Is not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro. 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUp"oF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D 8ts., Eureka, Cal. 

A R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

NOTHING, SHOES. HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

J07 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 

You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It is Increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people und pia^e 
them whole they belong — on exeeei 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and incomes. Because of this he is be; 
Ing attacked more bitterly than any 
>t>>«, r m*n In pnh'lr life 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year— Agents Wanted 

La Fotlette's Magazine. Madison, Wis. 



Honolulu Letter List 



Andei 
Alio, Jack 

en, J5ert 
Bradley, Ed. 

1 

u. J. 
Danielsen, Adolf 

Nils 

Ward 

Kims, B, O. 
Erlkson, H 11 mar 
Fuller. G. E. 
Harms. 
Holm, .1. H. 
Hendriksen, J. 

son, William 
1 a i sen, John 



Lambert, Ed. 

i. William 
eel, II. C. 
Mulligan, Bid. 
Nystrom, Uno 
Nyatrom, Prank 
Olof A. 
Tom 
< Ibolln, Kris 
Pierson, A. 

. Jack E. 
Rier, Karl W. 
Sandel, F. S. 
Solberg, B. P, 
Stewart, R. T. 

Vhatton, II. if. 
Veneker, i "■ 
Walby, M. 

Wolters, Lloyd 



INFORMATION WANTED 



M e m 1) e i s of crews of Barge 
"Ohio" and S. S. "Gulfcoast" will 
kindly communicate with this office 
rding their salvage claims 
nst the Standard Oil Barge No. 
1 between Mobile and Port Arthur 
about May 18th. I represent a 
member of the crew and have 
already taken up the matter of a 
salvage award for him. Silas B. 
Axtell, New York, N. Y. 7-14-20 



TO MY CLIENTS 

Please look over our legal 
file in every 
Union Hall on the i 

you are in port. 
Notice of commencement of 
ir appearance 
on the calendar for trial, 
judgments and settle- 
ments effected are published 
in all cases whether for 

es, salvage or pei 
injury. Law Office, Silas B. 
Axtell, r ' State Street. New 
York. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine 



All traffic records since the opening of the 
Panama Canal were broken during August. 
Three hundred ships passed through the water- 
way, the tolls being $936,209. 

The G. M. Standifer Construction Company 
ill" Portland, Ore., lias been awarded a contract 
for the building of two 8800-ton oil tankers for 
the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. 
Work will begin on the vessels immediately, 
according to advices from Portland. 

Seattle's water-borne commerce, domestic and 
foreign, totaled $399,346,761 in value the first 
seven months of the year, according to statistics 
made public by Port Warden Fred M. Lathe. 
Domestic imports aggregated $67,701,201 and 
domestic exports $46,818,439. Foreign imports 
totaled $187,586,733 and foreign exports $87,- 
140,388. 

The Shipping Board has devised a scheme to 
distinguish a craft belonging to the American 
merchant marine, according to word from Wash- 
ington. A shield bearing the stars and stripes 
will be placed on the bow of every Shipping 
l'.oard vessel, to distinguish it from the crafts 
of other nations. More than 500 of these em- 
blems have been ordered and will be supplied 
to each vessel as fast as they are turned out. 

The Pacific-Caribbean-Gulf Steamship Line of 
San Francisco announced that it has estab- 
lished a new service from Elliott Bay and other 
Pacific Coast ports to the Caribbean sea, Cuba 
and New Orleans, with A. M. Gillespie, Tnc, 
of Seattle as Puget Sound agents. Four ships 
each of 5000 deadweight tons or 4000 tons 
cargo capacity have been ordered into the new 
service. Two others will be added later. 

California cargoes totaling 90,000 tons will be 
moved to the East Coast during the next few 
months by the Luckenbach Steamship lines, it is 
announced. In addition to their own steamers, 
the Luckenbachs have secured several Shipping 
Board craft. Two of these are the "Hannawa," 
recently turned out at the Union Iron Works, 
and the "Archer," which has been operating 
under the Pacific Mail flap. 

Flying the French ensign, the first seen in 
San Francisco fluttering from the masthead of a 
French clipper ship since the outbreak of the 
war, was sighted during the week when the ship 
"Edouard Bureau" sailed through the Golden 
Gate. The vessel made the run from Marseilles 
in 152 days, via Balboa seventy-three days. The 
craft arrived here in ballast and has been char- 
tered by Strauss & Company th carry grain 
from the Pacific to Europe. 

All steamship companies operating lines from 
the Atlantic Coast to the Pacific Coast via the 
Panama Canal have decided to fall into line 
with the railroads in advancing their rates 
33 1-3 per cent., and to make the advance 
'effective on September 4. according to advices 
received From the East by General Freight 
Agent F. A. Hooper of the European Pacific 
line (Williams Dimond & Co.), San Francisco. 
As described by Hooper's advices, the new 
rates generally "are to be 85 per cent, of the 
transcontinental rail rates in effect prior to 
August 26, or before the railroads made their 
advance of 33 1-3 per cent." 

The Shipping Board announces that it has 
entered into a contract with the Midwest Refin- 
ing Company, under the terms of which the 
oil company is to deliver 3,421.875 barrels of 
Shipping Board specification fuel oil during the 
fifteen months commencing July 1, 1920 and 
ending October 1, 1921, at the rate of 7,500 
barrels per day at San Francisco or San Pedro 
or San Luis, California, in exchange for which 
the Shipping Board is to deliver to the Mid- 
west Refining Company 2,161,230 barrels of 
Wyoming crude oil derived from the Govern- 
ment's royalty oil in the State of Wyoming, 
which oil the Shipping Board has contracted 
to purchase from the Government at the cur- 
rent market price prevailing at the wells at the 
time the oil is delivered. 

Fourteen wooden hulls, built during the war 
by the United States Shipping Board in the 
shipyards of the Portland district, are available 
for sale in the general campaign now being 
conducted by the Government to dispose of 
unfinished ships. Originally there were nineteen 
unfinished ships in Portland, but five have been 
sold. The hulls which have been disposed of 
include the "Acarmen," 3500 deadweight tons; 
the "Egeria." 3500 deadweight tons; the "Aban- 
tis," schooner, 3500 deadweight tons, and the 
"Meriden," steamer, 3500 deadweight tons. The 
"Acarmen" is to be converted bp her new 
owners into a baikentine. The "Egeria," pur- 
chased by II. W, Pennell and associates, is to 
be converted into a steam schooner. W. L. 
Haskins is the new owner of the "Abantis," and 
the "Abderia" and the Wilson Steamship Com- 
pany has purchased the "Meriden." 

Admiral Benson, chairman of the United 
States Ship;, in- Board, has issued orders to 
district agents and cither officials of the Board 
that no more vessels under the operation of 
the Shipping Board would be chartered for the 



export coal trade at the prevailing low rates. 
Shipping officials who have made inquiries have 
been informed that all charters must be ap- 
proved by the chartering agent before they be- 
come operative. It is stated that the chartering 
agents will withhold the vessels at the present 
rates quoted, and that meanwhile vessels amount- 
ing to 1,200.000 deadweight tons will he diverted 
to other trades such as the movement of grain 
and cotton. In the event that there is not 
enough demand for the vessels in this service 
the steamers will be tied up. According to 
shippers not many of the vessels withheld from 
the coal-carrying trade will be tied up for long. 
as the movement of grain and cotton is con- 
stantly increasing. 

Resolutions dealing with scientific exploration 
and recommending survey of the shore-line and 
coastal waters of the Pacific were adopted at 
the recent Pan-Pacific Conference of Scientists 
held in Honolulu according to E. A. Beaks 
of the local weather bureau, who arrived from 
Honolulu during the week, and William Bowie 
of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Bowie passed through San Francisco on the 
way to his post in Washington, D. C. The 
seventy scientists in attendance, who represented 
the United States. Hawaiian and Philippine Is- 
lam!', Canada, Japan, Australia and New- Zealand, 
discussed problems in anthropology, botany, zoo- 
logy, geology, oceanography, surveying and map- 
ping. It was said at the conference that maps of 
the survey of the shore line and coastal waters, 
physical oceanography and magnetic survey of 
the Pacific would have "great economic value 
to the shipping, fisheries and other marine 
interests." and that the cost of the surveys for 
the collection of data is relatively insignificant. 
Authorities stated that the great loss involved 
through wreckage owing to the incompleteness 
of charts would be abolished if this coast survey 
were made. 

Details were received recently stating that on 
August 17, last, the palatial liner "Empress of 
Canada" was launched in the Fairfield Ship- 
building and Engineering Company at Govan. 
The vessel was built under contract for the 
Canadian Pacific Ocean Service. Limited. The 
vessel was especially built for the trans-Pacific 
service running From British Columbia to the 
Orient. The "Empress of Canada" has an 
overall length of 653 feet. 77 feet in width and 
53 feet in depth to the bridge deck; she has a 
straight stem and a cruiser stern, three funnels 
and two-pole- masts. A feature of the craft is 
her promenade and boat decks, the former ex- 
tending the full length of the vessel. The "Em- 
press of Canada" has a tonnage of about 22.000 
tons and has accommodations to carry 490 first 
rabin passengers, 106 second. 238 third and will 
be manned by a crew of 547 men. The speed 
of the vessel will be 21 knots and when placed 
in operation will be the finest passenger vessel 
afloat on the Pacific. The vessel is installed 
with telephones connecting with a central ex- 
change, a passenger elevator and a large swim- 
ming nbol. Throughout the vessel special atten- 
tion is everywhere given to the fart that the 
"Empress of Canada" is to- serve in a serni- 
tro'iical climate. 

The Java-Pacific steamer "Arakan." which ran 
ashore in a thick fog off Point Revcs iust 
north of San Francisco, on Aug. 29. was floated 
on Sept. 1 after three days of unrelaxing labor 
on the part of her crew, a flotilla of wrecking 
craft and several hundred men Slightly leak- 
in"- where her hu'l buckled under the stoke- 
hold and with cripoled engines the steamer 
slowly made port under tow. Small craft and 
an armv of men from miles alone the coast 
swooped down upon the tettisoned cargo in 
such numbers that the ship's agrents '-cut a 
hurry call to Marin county authorities to rush 
men to protect the jetsam. Contrarv to ex- 
pectations of th'" crew and marine underwriters, 
most of the $1000 000 careo of tea. rubber, 
SUsrar and conra aboard the "Arakan." was 
saved. Earlv in the day on Sent. 1 it was de- 
c-i'lcd to jettison the entire rar^o and confine 
all efforts to savins: the shin in itself repre- 
senting an investment of SI. 000000 Steve- 
dores -who were hurried to the stranded yes I '< 
from San Francisco threw overboard 700 tons 
of coora rake, the least vahiahle of the cargo. 
A portion of this is expected to be salvaged. 
Extreme difficult" was experienced bv the 
wreckiii"- shin "Homer" and smaller tugs in 
their attemnfs to 'jet lines aboard the- shin. 
A strone- southeast gale enhanced the hazards. 
and troubles were Ov-fCdine oillv at the cost 

of smashins a launch From the "Homer." The 
fin^l and successful attomof to save the "Ara- 
kan" w's made : >t hi"h tide shortlv hefori 
noon. The lines from the fugs tautened in one 
mightv effort, and. straininq and trembling, the 
huge ship floated out into deeper water. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION 



THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

67-69 Front Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass MILLER JENSEN, Agent 

1% Lewis Street 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Agent 

123 Twentv-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La IAMES C. BURNS, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WM. MILLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I ALFRED TAMKE, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga L. A. PARKS, Agent 

27 Houston Street 

1 M 'KSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla C. THEO. IVERSON, Agent 

12% Liberty Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C H. COOK, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. V. ROREN, Agent 

433 Court Street 

BALTIMORE, Md J. A. MORRIS, Agent 

1611 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa DAVID COOK, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

MOBILE, Ala J. W. ENGLAND, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex R. M. WILSON, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

SAVANNAH. Ga 21 West Bay Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C W. ROSSI, Agent 

49 Market Street 
Sub Aqencies: 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEAN W. MENDELL, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla CHAS. OGRAIN, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PORTLAND, Me 5 Exchange Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 669 Eddy Street 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md MORRIS KRAIN, Agent 

804 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

TORT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex HARRY BROWN, Agent 

321% Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La CHAS SULLIVAN, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala JAMES GRACE, Agent 

11% St. Francis Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I C. BLAKNEY, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me A. ANDRADE, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga GEO. McMURDO, Agent 

523 East Bay Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla J. T. HADAWAY, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C J. T. ROBINSON, Agent 

49 Market Street 



S. T Hogevoll, Admiralty Law- eamen's 

,i es a specialty Sixth floor. Pacific Bldg., 

Fourth ami Market Sts.j San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1830. — Adv. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

Headquarters: 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary. 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass F. L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

VI'LANTIC CITY, N. J.....H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

NEW BEDFORD, Mass C. E. DOUCETT, Agent 

91 North Second Street 



BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

II. ESKIN, Secretary 
HOROKEN, N. J 316 River Street 



EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
I). J. CEDDES. President 

NEW HAVEN, Conn 13% Collls Street 

(Continued on Pace 11) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francl»co 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



SCHARRENBERG. 

8. A. SILVER 



Editor 

Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1 .50 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business anil Editorial Office. Maritime Hall Bldfc-. 

5S Clay St., Ban Francisco. Telephone Kearny 222S 

Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for In Section 1103. Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1920. 



THE JOURNAL'S BIRTHDAY 



With this issue the Journal enters 
upon the thirty-fourth year of its existence. 

Measured by the life of stars, thirty- 
three years ; s but a flash — a mere twink- 
ling of the eye. But in the life <>f man 
and in the life (if a newspaper, that length 
(if time is in must instances more than 
sufficienl to denote success or failure. 

I las the Journ \i. been a succi 

The answer to this question is best sup- 
plied by the records. Anyone sufficiently 
interested can go through the files of the 
Journal and then make a mental com- 
parison with publications issued avowedly 
as purel) commercial ventures for indi- 
vidual profit. 

The Journal was never meant to be 
a commercial venture. Vet it has paid 
more handsome profits to the men who 
own it than the besl paying periodical in 
all the world. It has paid dividends and 
brought returns far beyond the hopes and 
dreams of its founders. 

Higher wages, shorter hours, better liv- 
ing and working conditions aboard ships. 
are just a few of the tangible returns. Fn 
a large measure they have been made 
sible through the general and systematic 
dissemination of useful knowledge among 
seamen. But the public, too, has had its 
education through the publication of plain 
facts regarding that poetic "life on the 
n wave" which has never been as 
pictured. 

As the direct sequence of it all has come 
the remodeling of the American maritime 
law rind the general elevation of the craft 
to a higher level. 

In its thirty-three years of existence the 
JOURNAL has newer missed or skipped a 
single issue. Hard times or good times, 
the message of hope and cheer to tin 
faring people has gone forth every week 
fifty-two time- a year. 

Truly, it is a proud record, for as far 
as known the Journal was the first news- 
paper published exclusively in behalf of 
those who live upon the watery part 



of the globe. To-day fully a dozen pub- 
lications in nearly as many maritime 
nations are devoted to the cause in which 
the American seamen's paper blazed the 
way. All are doing great work. And 
what is better still, right now there is 
more team work, more pulling together 
to advance the cause of those who earn 
their livelihood Upon the waters, than at 
any time in the history of seamen's 
unionism. 

Therefore, the JOURNAL deems this birth- 
day a particularly happy one and looks 
forward into the ever uncertain future 
with perhaps greater confidence than has 
been voiced at any time in its long and 
eventful career. 



THE DELEGATES' REPORT 



The report of the delegates who repre- 
sented the organized seamen of America 
at important conferences in Europe is pub- 
lished in this issue and sneaks for it-elf. 

Tt is not an easy task to present an 
editorial summary of the lengthy report 
because each point dealt with at the dif- 
ferent conferences in Europe is more or 
less complicated and easily subject to 
misunderstanding unless exhaustively re- 
viewed. An effort will be made to do 
this in succeeding issues of the Journal. 

The outstanding feature of the Genoa 
conference, held under the auspices of the 
League of Nations, is the "progressive" 
attitude toward some of the principal 
points in the much-maligned La Follette 
Seamen's Act. Poor old Captain Dollar. 
and others of that type, who have never 
been quite happy since that great charter 
of freedom was enacted now find them- 
selves totally isolated. for several of 
the alleged "impossible theories" in the 
La Follette Act have been pronounced 
"O. K." in a conference composed of offi- 
cial representatives from the maritime 
nations of the world. Moreover, the sea- 
men of America who had inspired all 
the commotion over the right to quit, etc., 
were not represented at all in that meet- 
ing. At least not "officially." 

Kven more gratifying is the subsequent 

unanimous endorsement of the American 

proposals submitted for consideration to 
the conference of the International Sea- 
farers' Federation. 

The organized merchant seamen of the 
world are now on record, formally, offi- 
cially and, as stated, unanimously for these 
basic principles: 

1. The repeal of all laws under which 
seamen are or may be arrested and im- 
prisoned for violation of the shipping arti- 
cles when a vessel is in a safe harbor. 

2. The abrogation of all treaties under 
which seamen are arrested, detained and 
surrendered back to the vessel from which 
they have deserted. 

3. To place seamen upon the same 
with shipowners, i. e.. to make the 

violation of a contract to labor a civil in- 
stead of a criminal offense: and 

4. To at all times exempt the Sea- 
men's clothes from attachment by the 

or the master. 
With both conferences on record Upon 
these vital points — and on record in lan- 
guage that i an scarcely be misunderstood, 
-amen of America have scored a dis- 
tinct and clear-cut victory. No one con- 



versant with general conditions had ex- 
pected such a decision so soon. But since 
it has been made a unanimous vote 50 
tar as the seamen are concerned, there is 
everv reason for all around congratulation. 

It is to be regretted that the Genoa con- 
ference acted decidedly unprogressive on 
other important questions. 

On the proposals to reduce the hours 

of labor, the meeting adopted a "recom- 
mendation" dealing Only with the hours 
of labor in inland navigation to the effect 
that those nation- which have not yet 
provided by legislation for an eight-hour 
day and a forty-eight hour week, should 
do -o at the earliest opportunity. Dealing 
with the hours of labor at sea the meet- 
ing drafted, but failed to adopt a "draft 
convention" b the two-thirds major- 

ity necessary to adopt were not obtained. 
Naturally this attitude of the confer- 
ence has aroused a great dial of bitter- 
ness among the seamen of Europe who 
had expected much in this regard. Voicing 
this dissatisfaction, the official paper of the 
British Seamen's Union, -peaking for some 
125, IH)H merchant seamen, says in its cur- 
rent issue : 

There were present at the ('(inference two 
Government delegates from Siam. We ai 
aware of the extent of the mercantile marine 
of that country, but we have an ill-defined im- 
pression tied it is not much more important 
than thai 'if Switzerland. Anyhow, there were 
mi representatives present either of the ship- 
owners or the seamen el* Siam. Yel these two 
Siamese Government delegates voted solemnly 
and solidly with the British Government rep- 
resentatives all the way through. If Siam could 
have been eliminated from the conference there 
would have been two votes less against the 
forty-eight-hour week and we should have had 
the necessary two-thirds in favor instead of the 
fractional majority against. 

The foregoing is merely a paragraph 
from considerable spicj comment on that 

subject. But it will suffice to show that 
Siam furnished the votes t'i shelf the forty' 
eight hour week for the world's merchant 
seamen. 

< >u at least two other matters acted 
upon by the Genoa conference, there is 
for serious apprehension on the part 
df seamen. To be sure America is not 
a member of the League of Nations, and 
therefore free to act as it chooses. Never- 
theless, there is ground for alarm. And 
this alarm was voiced by . the Brussels 
Seafarers' Federation meeting through the 
unanimous adoption of a resolution pro- 
testing against the "draft convention" re- 
lating to employment agencies. 

The other question acted upon at Genoa 
which is likely to prove very objection- 
able are the steps taken to pav unemploy- 
ment benefit to seamen. 

Andrew Furuseth, in particular, has ex- 
pressed grave fears that the two last- 
named proposals instead of being helpful 
and advantageous to seamen, are likely to 
the \er\ opposite effect. Furuseth 
fears that men who know exactly what 
they are about have laid the ground work 
for new chains to be securely fastened to 
all merchant seamen when ashore. The 
chains in question will be the rules and 

regulations which are to govern seamen 

under the brand new beneficiary schemes 
launched at the Genoa conference under 
the League of Nations auspices. 

That Furuseth's apprehensions in this 

respect are largely justified by events of 
the past, gi ies w ithout sayin 

Fortunately, the seamen of the world. 

in and out of the League of Nations 

ting, and in a large measure, think- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ing together over these very problems. 
Therein lies the hope and, it may be said, 
the guarantee that nothing' will be put 
ovar in inner councils of statesmen or 
politicians to take from the seamen one 
single right or advantage won through 
years of collective effort. 

The seamen of the world are determined 
to move forward — not backward. This 
stead v onward move will be made with 
the sanction of the League of Nations, if 
possible. But, if necessary, progress can, 
will, and must be made without such 
sanction. Yes, even in the face of oppo- 
sition. 



CALIFORNIA'S PROBLEM 



Tt is a shame that California politicians 
continue to exploit the Japanese problem 
for the purpose of lining up the votes — 
for themselves. 

Tust as long as this is the case folks in 
other parts of America are skeptical. They 
want to be shown by others than mere 
politicians. And that is truly unfortunate 
for California, because the State has a real, 
serious problem on its hands. 

Board of Health statistics recently pub- 
lished show that the total number of white 
births in California in l f >19 was 51,316. Of 
births other than white there were 5,205, 
and of that number 4,458 were Japanese, 
and the balance, 747, divided among all 
the other races represented, Chinese, ne- 
groes, Indians, etc. That is to say, among 
the races other than white in California 
the Japanese are furnishing six times as 
many births as all the others combined! 

In 1908, after adoption of the gentle- 
men's agreement, the Japanese births num- 
bered 455. Their annual births have mul- 
tiplied since then tenfold, and still steadilj 
increase. 

Does that furnish food for reflection to 
Americans who realize the danger from 
an overwhelming flood of a non-assimila- 
ble race, superior in economic competition? 



THE TEST OF LABOR'S STRENGTH 



The Journal regrets to report the death 
of Mrs. Thomas A. Hanson, the wife of 
Comrade Hanson, Secretary-Treasurer of 
the International Seamen's Union of Amer- 
ica. Mrs. Hanson died at the family home, 
in Chicago, on August 24, after a brief 
illness. She leaves behind a sorrowful 
husband and four disconsolate daughters. 
To all of these the JOURNAL, on behalf of 
the seamen of America, extends heartfelt 
sympathy — 

To die is landing on sonic silent shore, 

\\ here billows never break nor tempests roar, 

Ere well we feel the friendly stroke 'tis o'er. 



It is a genuine pleasure to note that 
candidate Harding is not on the fence as 
far as the La Follette Seamen's Act is 
concerned. In an Associated Press dis- 
patch, dated September 1, the Republican 
candidate for a four-year berth in the 
White House is quoted as saying that he 
thinks "the La h'ollette Seamen's Act rep- 
resents the conscience of America." Good 
enough, Mr. Harding. Both of the old 
political parties are in agreement upon 
that issue. So there is no need for fur- 
ther comment. All is well that ends well! 



Organized labor too often commits the 
common error of neglecting its friends in 
order the more sedulously to cultivate its 



enemies. 



Gems of Truth and Wisdom from the Pen of 

Walter Macarthur, Former Editor 

of The Journal 

Walter Macarthur, United States Shipping 
Commissioner of San Francisco, and for many 
years editor of The Seamen's Journal, is the 
author of a splendid Labor Day sermon, pub- 
lished in "Organized Labor" of San Francisco, 
from which the following- paragraphs have been 
selected: 

The labor movement is the expression and 
embodiment of the human impulse toward a 
higher plane of life, a manifestation of that 
"intelligent discontent" which is said to lie the 
mother of progress. Consequently, the labor 
movement registers in its history the force of 
the impulse to which it owes its existence, 
progressing or declining in proportion as that 
impulse is strong or weak. 

Considering the world events of the past few 
years, we should expect to find the labor move- 
ment of to-day in a position of greater power 
and potency than ever before Judging by ex- 
ternal appearances alone, this is exactly what 
we do find. 

The membership of the American Federation 
of Labor has increased threefold during the 
hist ten years. During last year the increase 
of membership was 872,672, making a total of 
4.078,740. These figures, of course, are exclu- 
sive of the large numbers of organized workers 
as yet unaffiliated with the Federation. 

So far, then, as numerical strength may be 
taken as a criterion, the labor movement of 
to-day measures up to the needs of the times and 
to its responsibilities as a factor in the life of 
the Nation. 

It goes without saying, however, that mere 
numbers do not imply a corresponding degree 
of strength. ( In the contrary, a great increase 
of numbers ma\ involve an actual hiss of 
strength, by weakening the bond that unites the 
whole membership. All depends upon circum- 
stances. 

A body composed of four million trade-union- 
ists that is, of men and women who are 
grounded in the principles of trade-unionism 
and who recognize the limitations as well as 
the powers of the trade-union — may be re- 
garded as invulnerable. On the other hand, 
a body the members of which arc held together 
by mere instinct — the gregarious instinct, so to 
speak — but who are lacking in true conception 
and clear understanding of the purposes and 
methods of the trade-union, is predestined to 
failure, and the larger the body the more cer- 
tain and disastrous the failure. 

Muring a period of normal growth in the 
labor movement the work of education keeps 
pace with the increase of members. The judg- 
ment and experience of the older members pre- 
dominates over the enthusiasm of the novitiates. 
By a process of action and reaction a balance 
is maintained between the cautious and the ven- 
turesome, with the former ever in control. 

As a result of the rapid growth of the labor 
movement during the past few years the balance 
between caution and enthusiasm has been dis- 
turbed. Some recently organized unions seem 
to be actuated by enthusiasm rather than by 
judgment, and even the oldest trade-unions are 
not immune from the spirit of unrest and 
adventure. 

These manifestations of impatience and dar- 
ing, of a willingness, if not .determination, to 
unduly enlarge the activities of trade-unionism, 
to divert that institution to objects that lie be- 
yond its proper sphere, constitute a menace to 
the stability of the labor movement. 

The real strength of the labor movement con- 
sists in its devotion to certain clearly defined 
objects. The proof of its strength consists in 
its ability to adhere to these objects and to 
withstand pressure from within its own ranks 
designed to force it into the pursuit of other 
objects. 

In some cases the test will be severe, but it 
can be met with absolute confidence in the out- 
come, provided the character of the trade-union 
be understood and accepted for what it is. in- 
stead of being misunderstood for something en- 
tirely different. 

The trade-union, as a body of working men 
or women, united for the purpose of regulating 
the conditions of employment in the trade, is 
the strongest medium for such purpose. Such 
a body combines all the elements of cohesion, 
namely, common understanding of conditions, 
common agreement as to methods, and mutual 
confidence in the plan of action. Thus formed 
and conducted, the trade-union is capable of 
achieving material results. 

To the extent that the activities of the labor 
movement shall be limited to reform in the con- 
ditions of labor, that movement will succeed in 
the future as in the past. To the extent that 
the labor movement shall be diverted to other 
objects, no matter how worthy or urgent in 
themselves, that movement will fail. 

With a clear conception of the nature and 
functions of labor organization, and with un- 
wavering fidelity to purpose, the labor move- 
ment may face the future with perfect conli- 
den< e in its own stability. The rapid increase 
of membership thai marks the present period ol 
on historj is to be w elcomed, in the ivm 
that growth in numbers is accompanied by a 
proportionatt growth of understanding and true 
comradeship in the common cause. 







SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cab, Sept. 7, 1920. 
A synopsis of the meeting of the above date 
will be published in the next issue. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 
Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Mall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Thone 

Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, I'.. C, Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping very dull; prospects uncertain. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency. Sept. 7. 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency. Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL. Aeent. 
84 Seneca Street. P.O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 7. 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency. Sept. 7. 1929. 
Shipping medium; prospects fair. 

JACK ROSEN. Agent. 
88% Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSFN, Agent. 
128'< Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 

67. Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, Aug. 2.^, 1920. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

JOSEPH FALTUS, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS* ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cab, Aug. 26, 1920. 
Shipping fair. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
No. 42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Aug. 19, 1920. 
Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room No. 203. P. O. 
Box 514. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Aug. 19, 1920. 
No meeting. Scarcity of members. 

JOSEPH MACK. Agent. 
No. 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 54. Phone 

Sunset 547-W. 



Work of outfitting the tug "Sea Monarch" 
will be completed within sixty (lavs, according 
to J. 1). De Brettiville of San Francisco. 

Stanley Hollar of San Francisco has pur- 
chased the Monarch Lumber Mills, located on 
the Columbia River, for a figure in excess of 
$1,000,000, L. W. David, owner, announced at 
Portland, Or. The mills have a capacity of 
250,000 feet a day. 

The snagboat "Bear." now under construc- 
tion at the Schulz yards in South City for the 
United States Engineering Reclamation Serv- 
ice for operation on the Sacramento and San 
Joaquin rivers, will be ready for her engine 
installation shortly, according to De Brettiville. 

At high water in the morning of Sept. 2 the 
tug "Sea Scout." last of the four tugs building 
for the Red Stack Tug Boat Company, slid 
from the ways at the Frank Stone yards in 
Oakland. The vessel was towed to China Basin 
to have her engines and other equipment in- 
stalled by the Main Iron Works. 

Radio inspectors of the Department of Com- 
merce, stal loiied at San Francisco, have been 
unable to locate the wireless operator who in- 
sisted on testing his apparatus while the steam- 
ship "Arakan" was trying to send out an S. I I 
S. call. The testing was heard at the Depart- 
ment's office in the Custom House, but there 
no clew to the operator. 

United States Lighthouse Inspector II. W. 
Rhodes arrived at San Pedro during the weel 
and announced that frank Vanderlip had ten- 
dered a (\cc<\ for the land to be used for a 
lighthouse at I'oint Vii i nte The price is -aid 
to havi been i inal. This is the land over 

Which there w as an upi oar when the ow n 

eral yean ago, asked what the Government 

dei l.i i -'I e ' an i sorbitant price. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ON THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Contributed by the Atlantic and Gulf Seamen's Unions 



A TRAITOR TRAPPED 



Excerpts from the Minutes of the Marine 
Cooks' and Stewards' Association of the 
Atlantic and Gulf Headquarters, 12 South 
Street. New York City. Aug. 4, 1920. 
New Business -President stated that ex-mem- 
ber C. II. Thompson, who has been for 

engaged in an at' get control ol 

this Union and its finances, has been caught 

with the g Is. The following affidavits and 

a conf Thompson after he saw he was 

trapped, will be self-explanatory: 
St. He of New York, 

if New York— ss. 
Irving Weiss, being duly sworn, deposes and 
says. That he resides at No. 262 South 4th 
Street, Borough of Brooklyn. City of New 
York: that on or about the 15th day of June, 
he was called on at his said home by one 
Constantine Hector Thompson, where thi 
Thompson made a proposition with depi 
to help send Henry P. Griffin and W. L. Cart- 

:nt and - 
respectively, of the Marine Cooks' 
arils' Association of the Atlantic and Gulf, to 
jail in which event -aid Thompson would get 
control of the said As 

depon -ition in the Association besides 

a certain sum of money. After consider]', 
matter deponent decided to inform said Griffin 
and Cartledge of the unscrupulous methods and 
unlawful ai aid Thompson to -end them 

to jail. That after informing said Griffin and 
Cartledge of the methods of Thompson, thej 
instructed me to keep in with said Thoi 
and give him rope enough and he would hang 
If. On the thirty-first 'lav of July last 
past and at mv house said Thompson tried to 
induce some men to go to court and make a 
falsi i isation against said Griffin and Cart- 
ledge, of getting money from them for the job 

m no receipt for the sami 
keeping the money for their own use. 

aid this matter hai tar enough, and 

there being mi the adjoining room a man 
a Detectivi Agency and two officers of the 
Union who overheard tin- attempt of Then 
• these men in the dining room to 
against Griffin and Cartledge. 
Deponent asked the officers of the Union if 
said Thompson should, he arrested then 
then and that said Thou <ded for mercv 

and said he would make a written Stat' 

sing the whole plol and Mr. Donah took 
ment and Thompson signed the 
same. 

[RVING W EISS. 
Swum to before me this 2nd day 
1920. 

CIS P. M \CIAS. 
Notary Public 
New York County, N 

Citj of New York, 

County of Kings . 

Marty Fern, Benjamin Miller. Win. Kalison, 
Michael Yoches, all being residents in the 
of Kings, each for himself being duly 
sworn and says, that all of them were 

in the premises at 262 South Fourth Stn 
the residence of Irving Weiss, on the M - 
of July, 1920. when one Constantine Hector 
Thompson came into the said residence and in 
the presence of all of the above deponents of- 
fered each of them a sum of money to I 
swear thai they had paid $5.00 to one Griffin, 
the President, and V ecretary of 

the Marine Cook-' and Steward 
of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast-, in cash for 
the purpos uring a job on a steamship 

and the said Constantine Hector Thoi 

all of the deponents herein to perjure 
themselves and swear out a warrant for t' 

o men, namely Henry P. Griffin 
and W. I.. Cartledge, ami if they, the -aid de- 
its, will succeed in getting tin- said two 
officials arrested, he the -aid Constantine Hector 
Thompson, will pay to the said deponents to 
each of them the sum of money they may name. 
Deponents each for himself swear that they 
refused to accept any money from the said Con- 

ne Hector Thompson on the ground 
th'ej knew the request by the said Thompson 
being illegal, deponents are making this affidavit 
for the purpos ; ng the matter clear in 

the < vent that th< ; Constantine 1 1 

Thorn] ild have obtained such illegal affi- 

davit i is willing to perjure 

himself for the money received. 
MARIA' FERN, 

343 Bedford Irooklyn. 

BENJAMFN MILLER, 

148 So. 4th St., Brooklyn. 
WILLIAM KALISON, 

11" So. 1st St.. Brooklyn, 
MICH \LI. \< X i 

217 So. 3d St., Brooklyn, 
Sworn to before me thi- 3d day of Aii 

iM.\ mi i lipkowi rz. 

_■ - Co. 77. 



State of New York. 
County of Xew York — ss. 

Ralph J. Donals, John J. Kelly and John J. 
iort, being dulj and severally sworn, de- 
That at the request of H. P. 
Griffin, President of the Marine < o I Stew- 

Vssociation of the Atlantic and Gulf, they 
went to 262 South Fourth Street, Borough o\ 
of New York, the residence of 
Irving Weiss, to listen to a conversation that 
to take place there. Weiss secreted depo- 
with one Morris in a bed room adjoining 
the dining room and the transom being open 
am! the door slightly ajar deponents recognized 
Constantine Hector Thompson when he arrived 
in the dining room and notes wire made of the 
ving conversation: 
On July 31. 1920, when -aid Thompson came 
the room with six men and -aid Thomp- 
son -aid: ''What I want you men to do. Did 
any of you men work around the first of the 
month: The men answered no. Then said 
■! Mi. Griffin had expelled him 
from the Union, but the members are all wil- 
ling to admit him hut Mr. Griffin said to throw 
Oil Now in order for us to win we have 
got to prove thai Griffin took graft fron 
men. Three of you men 1 want to swear that 
Griffin took mo >V and to swear that 

>me date around thi I the month you 

men went to Mr. Finnett's office and 
that von did n how to go about it to 

get a job and you asked some of the men 
around there and they told von that you would 
lave to ■ ,,1 join 

the 1 Inion iu to say that w hen you 

to the I Fnion that < rriffin ami 
Cartledge were there and thev took Five Dol- 
ipiece from each of you men and 
ked for a receipt you were told by 
that when you make a trip and come hack and 

pay the balance jrou would get the Union 1 !-.. 

.inl then von men are to say that von could not 
told VOU would have to hang 

around about two weeks. .Ami when you went 
bad in the Union office to get your money 
you were told to get out, that vou would not 
Bret tl If I get this -w orn stat 

that Griffin took the money 1 will sue 
and then you men 0U met Mr. 

Thompson and were advised bv him to go to 
court and get a summons for the one who took 
the money and --arrant for Griffin and 

Cartledge. 

You will not get nionev just now. but we are 
-nre to win. I mean T have not got money 
now but we will gc» money if we win and you 
will be well taken care of." 

'n's point Weiss threw open the 
ing this thing has gone far enom men's 

then stepped into the dining room ami Weiss 
asked Kelly and Lamport if -aid Thompson 
should not he arrested there and then. 

I Thompson pleaded for mercv and stated 
"that he would make a written confession" 
which he did ami -aid confession was taken 
down in writing bv Ralph 1 Donals and was 

signed bv said Th pson ami three witnesses. 

R. 1. DONA1 
I' IHN 1. KELLY. 
JN< >. I. 1 AMPORT. 
Sworn to me this 2nd day of A 

1920. 

CCS. P. MACIAS. 
Notarv Public, No. 12, 
Xew York County. 

July 31, 1920. 

I. Mr. Charles Constantine Hector Thompson. 

certify that the following statement is 

the truth, and hereon to that effect sign my 

name. 

The statements I issued about the Marine 

Cooks' and Steward-' Association of the \t1an- 

ulf and the officials of this Assoi 
was untruth fill ami financed bv a C 
individuals who led me to belie.' that I was 
to make a certain sum of mom 

I hereby certify that the untruths wen told 

about the purchase of a house and that all 

lents made bv me detrimental to the 

i oil I fabri- 

ion. 

iNSTANTINE HECTOR THOMPSON. 
1 hereby sign mv name. 
--: Jno. Lamport, 

Stenographer R. J. Donals 
Marty Pern. 
We have two more affidavits of a similar 
kind at Headquarters. 

Thompson was admitted to thi 

ized to tin- officers and members for his 

unworthy conduct, admitted that the facts as 

were true and pleaded that he now 

that he was a fool and begged to be 

ated. He was asked to sign a written 

as he was in 

ng that be was advised 

ii nothing. Tl i a supreme quorum 

nt, his request For re-admittance to 

put to the vote Thi ulti d 



as follows: None in favor of re-admittance to 
membership; 160 opposed. 

Moved and seconded that the Executive Hoard 
be instructed to summons before a regular meet- 
ing, Thompson's colleagues. Carried unani- 
mously. 

Good and welfare was discussed bv members 
and officers and on motion, meeting adjourned 
at 1:10 p. m. 225 members present at close. 

R< spectfully submitted. 

W. L. CARTLED 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

The foregoing affidavits and declaration 
.'in- faithfully reprinted from the minutes 
nf the regular meeting nf the Marine 
(links' and Stewards' Association nf the 
Atlantic and Gulf, hold at Headquarters, 
No. 12 South Street, Xew York, August 4. 
1920. 

Tin- purport nf the documents is obvi- 
ous and their language self-explanatory. 
We therefore respectfully commend their 
text to the earnest perusal and sincere 
consideration nf every Union seaman in 

On- I 'niti-d State-. 

Tin- aim and object of Thompson was 
obviously and unquestionably inspired by 
a lingering desire for revenge, and was 
the culmination nf a low-lived pint, for- 
mulated in a diseased and treacherous 
mind, to expel, disgrace and imprison Mr. 
Harry P. Griffin, president and founder nf 
the Marine Cooks' and Stewards' Associa- 
tion, mi perjured testimony, and then gel 
control nf the Association and its re- 
sources for his own aggrandizement. 

Hack of all tin's commotion appear cer- 
tain facts which may he cited to clear 

away some of the smoke thereby engen 
dered. 

"Thompson" of the many titles is a mys- 
terious and unnaturalized alien, alth 
he has resided in the United States for 
many years. The surname under which 
lie navigates is also suspected as an alien. 

lie is likewise a cripple, wearing a leg 

the carpenter made. For this reason lie 

always considers himself privileged to do 
and say things an able-bodied man with 
a complete set of original spars would not 
dare even to think of. The worst crim- 
inals always adopt the commonest names, 
and "Thompson" is ntie nf those in Eng- 
lish; and the must hopeless cripples are 
often the boldest malefactors because of 
their presumed immunity from man-han- 
dling. 

"Judas" Thompson was for some time a 
member of the Marine Cooks' and Stew- 
ards' Association. Having thus wiggled 
himself into recognition as a hona fide 
member of an honorable and reputable divi- 
sion of the International Seamen's Union 
of America, he proceeded to use it forth- 
with as a foundation for the fulmination 
of his own diabolical scheme to destroj 
the organization by poisoning the minds 
of loyal hut thoughtless members against 

their chosen leaders. 

There has been a Judas Iscariot, a Bru 
in- or a Benedict Arnold in every great 
movement anion"; human kind, and there 
always will he until the end of time. 

Old 'Iscariot was the prince and daddy of 
them all. hut he at least had the decency, 
when the enormit) of his offense had been 

revealed to him. to go nut and hang him- 
self. 

Some nf the other cowardh wretches 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



have waited for their swindled or deceived 
victims and comrades to rise up in right- 
eous indignation and hang them. But 
this cowardly and depraved villain, after 
heing detected and fully exposed, con- 
fesses his guilt and then, pleading peni- 
tence like a miserable craven, has the 
monumental nerve to ask for reinstatement 
in the organization he had sought to des- 
troy, and at the hands of the very men 
he had sought to ruin. 

We did not happen to be present at the 
meeting when the vote was taken on 
Thompson's reinstatement, but judging 
from the record, the members present must 
have had in mind the fable of the serpent 
which the kind-hearted farmer brought 
home to his fireside among his children 
on a cold night to let the poor thing warm 
itself. 

Exit Thompson. Now what was his 
motive? What was the underlying impulse 
which inspired and animated him through- 
out all his devilish plots? 

In his single confession Thompson al- 
leges that he himself had been made the 
pliant tool of certain conspirators who 
had led him to believe that by carrying 
out their wishes he was to "make a cer- 
tain sum of money." 

The only confederate Thompson ever 
had in these mischievous proceedings were 
the devil and "Tom Pepper." The devil 
tempts all men, but an idle man tempts 
the devil. Thompson was weary of work 
and was fishing for suckers. 

One day some time ago he went up to 
the hall of the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' 
Association, bringing with him a quantity 
of brass and tinsel jewelry — brass watches, 
copper rings, glass diamonds, fire-gilt 
chains, earrings, etc. — which he spread 
out in glittering array upon a reading 
table. 

When a crowd had gathered around to 
discuss this fascinating cheap Jack layout, 
the wily impostor produced a simple pocket 
edition of a peculiar gambling outfit, prob- 
ably of his own devilish contrivance, and 
inducted them into a new game of gam- 
bler keeps all. 

Meanwhile a few observant old-timers, 
witnessing his designing scheme, promptly 
carried the tidings of his presence and 
doings into the office. Whereupon Com- 
rade G. H. lb-own, business agent, and a 
couple of husky delegates promptly bore 
down on Mr. Thompson and hustled him 
unceremoniously into the street, heaving 
his Jerry junk and paraphernalia after him. 

Comrade Brown then wrote a letter to 
Comrade W. L. Cartledge, Secretary of the 
Marine Cooks' and Stewards' Association, 
informing him of what had occurred and 
reminding him that the hall of the Eastern 
and Gulf Sailors' Association was not a 
gambling resort. 

Upon receiving Comrade Brown's letter 
Mr. Cartledge called Thompson into his 
private office, and after reading the letter 
to him demanded to know what he meant 
by attempting to make a gambling bell of 
the Sailors' Hall. 

"Oh," exclaimed the cornered rat. "them 
damn Dutchmen up there are all grafters!" 

That was a-plenty for the irate secretary 
and he promptly ejected the wily weasel 
with more force than piety, hum leg and 
all. 

At the next meeting Mr. Cartledge pre 



ferred formal charges against Monsieur 
Thompson, and he was fined by the Union 
and ordered to apologize to the ofifended 
officers. 

This he subsequently did and was rein- 
stated with the result described. 

James H. Williams. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

( Continued from Page 3) 



genius of railroading. The oracles and wise 
men laughed at the trade unionist. 

Rates were increased and now the public 
is told that the railroads will order new 
equipment sparingly and that every atten- 
tion will be paid to repairing worn cars 
and locomotives, to scientific car loading 
and to speeding up the movement of freight 
cars that now average less than one hour 
a mile during the year. 

Equipment will not be purchased, it is 
stated, because of foreign competition 
which increases prices. 

The public is urged to be patient if 
service is not forthcoming as a result 
of a billion and a half rate raise. 

In short, the railroads will return to "the 
genius of railroading." 



has virtually stopped. It will take the 
country five years to catch up. The 
housing situation now is more acute than 
it was at the close of the war, when 
virtually all building had been halted for 
vears." 



Mexican Laborers 

Agitation by Arizona trade unionists 
has resulted in improved working condi- 
tions for Mexican laborers employed in 
the Salt river valley cotton fields, following 
an investigation by a commission composed 
of State officials, .Mexican officials and 
trade unionists. The commission sustains 
the organized workers by recommending 
that wages and working conditions of the 
Mexicans be improved. 

The objectionable policy of the cotton 
growers was defended by special interests 
in this State, who saw in the wholesale 
importation of laborers an opportunity to 
crowd the cities with workers who would 
accept lower living standards. 

Officers of the Arizona State federation 
of Labor are now investigating the claim 
that frequent deportations are taking place. 
The Mexican workers charge that those 
being deported are invariably men who 
have taken an active part in organizing 
workers in the Salt river valley district. 

"This condition," says the Arizona Labor 
Journal, "is creating an ugly spirit among 
the men and if not discontinued may 
result seriously. 

"Tf the officers and members of the 
Arizona Cotton Growers' Association will 
get closer to their employes and treat 
them more like human beings than beasts 
of burden, they will soon find a more 
contented and better working force of men 
and the cotton industry will not be in- 
jured. Conferences and adjustments of the 
many grievances which have been ignored 
all along with a raise of wages, will accom- 
plish all of this and more." 



U. S. Needs Houses 

Approximately 25,000,000 persons in this 
country are now living in temporary, 
crowded and sometimes unsanitary quarters, 
according to officials of the United States 
I lousing Corporation. 

"The nation is short more than 5,000,000 
dwellings and apartments," said one offi- 
cial. "All hopes of improvement must be 
deferred until next spring. Building now 



Want Compensation Bill 

The annual convention of the North 
Carolina State Federation of Labor in- 
structed the legislative committee to pre- 
pare a new compensation bill. The present 
law has a "contributory negligence" clause, 
-which permits employers to take many 
cases to the courts. 

There were more than 400 delegates 
present and the convention was declared 
to be the most successful in the history 
of the North Carolina movement. Presi- 
dent Moody and Secretary Worley were 
re-elected, and High Point was chosen as 
the next convention citv. 



Co-Ops. Prosper 

The report of the Central States Whole- 
sale Co-operative Society for the first six- 
months of this year shows sales totaled 
$1,068,636.25. The co-ops. paid a 5 per 
cent, dividend or returned savings of $2,450 
to the original plan Rochdale stores that 
traded with them. 

1 Hiring the last six months the society 
has bought its own building, which is also 
used for office headquarters. They have 
four floors, side tracks, etc., and are 
equipped to expand business to two or 
three million dollars a month, which is 
predicted within the next year. 



The union label protects the trade union 
against attack by constituting the purchaser 
the real employer. 

Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utili- 
ties. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and 
telephone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man 
suffrage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WORLD'S SEAMEN IN CONFERENCE 

(Continued from Page 2.1 

briefly reviewed the work of the I 
He referred to the unsuccessful strikes in 
Holland and Denmark and analyzed tin- reasons 
Failure. President Wilson replied to 
riticism of the Federation 
execU j shortcomings in 

rting the above mentioned strikes. This 
originated a discussion but in the end the 
■ -. address was adopted with scarcely 
a dissenting < 

Secretary Damm's financial report 
with a summary of the last Secretariat meeting, 
as W ell as certain recommendations to the 
■ution were available in type-written form, 
as follows: 

Report of Secretary Damm. 
the convention of the International Sea- 
farers' Federation: 

At the Secretariat meeting at Antwerp, 
January 23rd. it was derided that inquiry should 
be made into the position of the seat 

in Holland. Consequently the 

ident, myself and one of the members of 

the Secretariat, Mr. E. Cathery, General Secre- 

of the N. S. and F. U. of Great Britain 

and Ireland, : '" Rotterdam. The 

; i s { the Dutch Seamen's Union 
dracht, at once placed all their hooks at our 
disposal, but t! lis of the other Unions 

- willing. We made 
inquiries and came to the con- 
ii that there was no reason why the 
Eendracht should not be affiliated, 
they have done to the extent of 4.000 men 

"< In February 14th, 1920, the nl be- 

tween the Dutch shipowners and seamen termi- 
nated, and the seamen together with the dockers 
out on strike. Of this I notified all 
,ied Unions in previous re] 
"Hardly had the Dutch seamen lost their 
strike, the Cooks. Stewards, Sailors and 

Firemen in Denmark were led into a strike, 

, doomed to fail before it 
started -first of all because the Strike was 
the agreement entered into on June 1st, 
'. and secondly be- 
there exists in Denmark a Trades Dis- 
putes Court, which, at any time can make it 
to stril Owners availed them- 

selves of this Court as soon as the Si 
had declared their determination to obtain 
better conditions, and the Court imposed a fine 
on the three Unions of one million kroner, 
IS more than the funds held by the 
Unions. As soon as 1 got knowledge of this 
strike, T at once appealed to the different 
Unions for help foi inish comrades, and 

From the International Seamen's I nion oi 
America, 1 obtained permission to send $500. 
The Belgian 5 Union granted 10,000 

francs, and the N. S. and F. U. of Creat 
Britain granted them £1,000. The Unions in 
Sweden and Norway have also mai 
of large sums of monej — I do not know how 
much, as the Unions in Sweden and No 
sent their contributions direel to Denmark and 
not through the Federation. But wh; 
money that would have been sent would have 
been of very little value as the Owners had 
been able to obtain all the necessary labor 
from ' and from all parts of Denmark. 

blackleg organizations, called National Help 
iations, bad been started everywhere, 
up. The shipownei ' clerical stall's toj 

ersity men. and people of all classes went 
on board ships where navigating and engi- 
neerill assisted them to carry out the 

work so that the export trade could be kept 
up. The shipowners clerical stall's toj 
with all kinds of people loaded and disci i . 
the ships and consequently the strike caused 
very little inconvenience. Had the leaders of 
the Unions in Denmark notified tin Federation 
as soon, as tin strike broke out. there may 
have be, n ipe of sto ime of the 

ships manned by blacklegs from loading or 
discharging in foreign ports, but as three or 
four weeks bad been allowed to pass i 
notifying us, nothing could be done in foreign 
countries. Ml (bis resulted in the men being 
lied to return back to work without 
i gained anything, in fact much was lost. 
such as the three shifts on deck which was 
obtained hist year. The Owners further 
refused to negotiate with the men or to estab- 
lish a new agreement. On receipt of a tele- 
gram from Denmark, 1 proceeded there, and, 
together with Mr. h'uruseth of the American 
Seamen's Union, had s,-\ eral i on 
with the Union officials, and later with the 
Owners. And before 1 Left Copenhagen, I was 
given to understand tha Id be 

started at once. 
"I ha away from Ant w erp a lot during 

veil months since the Secretariat .Meeting. 
I have attended several meetings and di 

nd. visited Holland several times, 
both before and during the strike, and as you 

an i >i" n 1 1 in Ferei i held a t i 

prior to the confei ence calli d bj thi I 
of Nations. It may be said that tl 
did not obtain much of value at the last 
mentioned conference, hut I am of the opinion 



the conference helped all seamen ;■ 

■ imbining in n strong Sea- 
deration. Enquiries have been received 
from Finland, Spain. Greece, Argentine, < heko- 
Slovakia, Canada, and Japan, and although 
are some leaders of Seamen's Unions 
would advocate thai the Seafarers' Fedei 
f In iuld b rl and parcel of the ' 

national Trans] orkers' Federation, 1 have 

esitation in saying that the International 

Federatii n ha number oi 

a now than were ever in the old Trans- 
port Workers' Federation. It has been stated 

by some of of the Trai 

ers' Federation thai they would not 

the Seafarers' Federation. 1 trust a day 

come whe wo Federations may be 

able to dork in harmony for the benefit of their 

i is, but 1 shall always maintain that 

stamen must he allowed to mind their own 

business. Xo workingman on shore is abb- in 
affairs. 
"It has been suggested to me that in future 
mthly report should lie sent out to all 
filiated. I hope this in will 

with the approval of all delegates and 
that the conference will provide for the neces- 
sary staff so thai all information oi importance 
can be sent out at once. 

"Owing to my frequent absence from Am 
and si i.iff, it has been impossible 

for me to have tl lited by a 

red accountant. I am, therefore, only 
able to render to you a summary I'm 

Statement. Same will, howe er, 'a- duly audited 

as so, hi as tin- conference is over and will be 
forwarded to you 

ithfully yours, 

"C. DAMM. 
issels, August 9, 1920." 

Secretary's Financial Report 
For six months, ending December 31, 1919. 

I n c o m e 

s . , 1 . 

i hand last Aeet 038- 4- 4, 

United Kingdom Pilots' Assn 13-15-0. 

Belgian Seamen's Union 31- 0- 

1 lull Seamen's Union 12-0-0. 

Nat. Sailors' and Firemen's Unioi 

Gt, Britain 541-13- 4. 

nion oi Cooks, Stewards, (it. 

Britain S3- 6- 8. 

Swedish Firemen's Union 12-10-0. 

■ 2- 1-8. 

Swedish Stew ards' Union 5-16- 8. 

-' 1 nion, 1 )enmark 25- 0- 0. 

Firemen's Union, Denmark 16-13- 4. 

I fnii m. Sweden 29- 3- 4. 

Norwegian Sailors and I 

1 nion 46- 7- 4. 

Inter. Seamen's Union oi America.. 416-13-4. 

ii >ks and Stew aids 9-0-0. 

< dbra! ,s and Seamen 6-5- 0. 



,889-K 



penditure 

s. d. 

Postage, Telegrams, Teh-phone 41-12- 7. 

Printing, S 288- 4- 0, 

Passport Expenses 11-13-6. 

retary and family 134-12- 8. 

Hotel Expenses ' 183-16-0. 

Moving Expenses, Secretary and 

Family 04-18- 0. 

Furniture 68- 5- 0. 

Auditor's Fee (last account) 4-4-0. 

izing l\ penses with foreign 

ships, i ,i mdon 16- 0. 

Clerk's Salary 42-10- 0. 

( Iffice Renl 26- 0- 0. 

Secretary's Salary, six months 250 u n 

Loss on Exchange 39- 4- 3. 

Bali : in Bank 718-10- 0. 



Financial Report 
For six months ending June 30, 
1 n c o 

Balance on hand last Acct 

1 fnited K ingdom Pilots' \ ssn 

I lull 

Nat. Sad, Ms' and Firemen's Union 

Gt. Britain 541-13- 4. 

Union of Cooks, Stewards. Gt. 

Britain 83-6-8. 

Inter. Seamen's Unii erica.... 416-13- I, 

Belgian Seamen's Union 52-3-4. 

Seafarers' Fed., Italy 83-6-8. 

Dutch Seamen's Union, laudracht . . . . 50- 0- 0. 

ish Seamen's Union 25- 0- 0. 

Swedish Firemen's Union 20-16- 8. 

Norwegian Sailors' and h'ircn 

Union 4(1- 0- 0. 

Bergen Stewards' Union 2-1-8. 








1920. 




718-10- 

9- 3- 

12- 0- 


d 


-1 

o 



2,051-15- 0. 
E x p e n d i t u r e 

,£. s. d. 

Postage, Telegrams, Telephone 66 6 7. 

iii Expenses 7-18- 0. 

Fares for 61-8 6. 

I lot-el Expenses . .' 106- 0- 0. 

Printing, Stationery II 9 6 

i iffii e Furniture... 92-10 0. 

Meeting I 1,105-16- 7. 



26-0-0. 

Clerk's Salary 91-0-0. 

Secretary's Salary, six months 250- 0- 0. 

on Exchange 74-11-4. 

nee in Hank 131-15- 0. 



2,054-15- 0. 
Outstanding 
France, Seafarers' Federation, 2 half 

years 167- 0- II. 

Danish Firemen's Union, last half 

year 16-13- 4. 

Danish Seamen's Cuion, last half year 25- 0- (I, 
Danish Cooks and Stewards, last half 
) ear 9-0-0. 



217-13- 4. 
Secretary Damm's report was adopted and the 
financial statement referred to the certified 
accountants and auditors who have regularly 
examined the financial affairs of the Federation. 
Various affiliated organizations had submitted 
proposals for discussion in writing. These had 
been typewritten and copies of the entire 
agenda were before each delegate at the con- 
ventii m 

The Shorter Workday. 
first on the list was the question of estab- 
lishing an international eight-hour workday, or 
rather the 48-hour week, upon which the Genoa 
conference under the auspices of the League of 
Nations had failed to reach an agreement. 

N iter a very lengthy debate the following 
resolution (introduced by the delegates from 
ium) was unanimously adopted: 
"Resolved: That steps be taken immediately 
f'u an international agitation to force the va- 
unts to grant our demands by 
lation; and an international campaign be 
1 at once with the object of establishing 
internationally a 48-hour week at sea and a 
14-hour week in port." 

Immediately following the adoption of the 

oing resolution the delegates from France 

introduced -a more detailed course of action 

upon the sann subject. A rough translation of 

the French proposal follows: 

"Whereas: The peace conference has adopted 
rking day of eight hours and a working 
of forty-eight hours as an ideal to be 
, Mi. liied. and 

"Whereas: The labor conference held at 
Washington. D, ('., under tile auspices of the 
e ,,f Nations, has declared that the prin- 
-■ht -hour day and the forty-cight- 
hour week should be applied to the seamen oi 
nations that are members of the League of 
Nation-, and 

"Whereas: This point of view has been con- 
tested by the shipowners at the Genoa con- 
ference, -mil shipowners maintaining that the 

ii alone should be outside this social 

reform; then-fore, be it 

"Resolved: By the International Seafarers' 
Federation in convention assembled at Brussels, 
in, that we adopt the Belgian resolution 
(quoted above) and decide: 

"1. To name a delegation with the mandate 

ill upon the director of the International 

Labor Office and demand that he organize an 

arbitration between the shipowners and seamen; 

"2. In case such arbitration should not take 
place the International Seafarers' Federation is 
to organize an international manifestation by 
declaring a strike of 48 hours in all ports; 

"3. If. following this first- movement, the 
shipowners and governments still remain ob- 
stinate a strike committee, selected by this 

nee, shall meet in order to fix the date 
of a strike without limitation and to make all 
arrangements necessary to carry the strike to a 
ul conclusion," 

resolution was adopted without opposi- 
tion, except that the American delegates, basing 
uthority to commit their Cuion to a 
general strike, refrained from voting. 

Delegate Lundgren, representing the Swedish 
Firemen, thereupon introduced still another res- 
olution on the establishment of the forty-cight- 
week, as follows: 
"Resolved: That the President and Secretary 
of the International Seafarers' Federation i 
all seafarers' organizations, who took part in the 
• ■en,, a conference, of the decision arrived at 
her, with a view of gifting them to 
the policy of the Federation so that shortly 
after the next Secretariat meeting the necessary 
an b, taken to enforce OUT demands in 
SUch countries where the matter has not been 
1 by legislative enactments." 
Tin Swedish resolution was also adopted and 
Damm, together with delegates Ri- 
vclli (France) and Chambers (Great Britain) 

were elected as the committee to call upon the 

director of the International Labor Office, as 

provided rn tin- French resolution. It was also 

■ 1 that tin- members .>f the Secretariat 

constitute the strike committee if it 

irt to a gi 

strike. 

The American Proposals. 
The i delegates had placed five points 

on the agenda. hour of these- points dealt 
with well known and related subjects. To qUOte 
from the agenda: 

"1. A request to the separate nations to 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



repeal all laws under which seamen are or may 
be arrested and imprisoned for violation of the 
shipping articles when a vessel is in a safe 
harbor. 

"2. The abrogation of all treaties under which 
seamen are arrested, detained and surrendered 
bach to the vessel from which they have de- 
serted. 

"3. That the seaman shall be placed upon the 
same level with the shipowner, i. e., that viola- 
tion of a contract to labor shall be a civil ill 
lieu of a criminal offense. 

"4. That the seaman's clothes shall at all 
times lie exempt from attachment by the vessel 
or the master." 

These four points were considered jointly and 
adopted without a dissenting vote. By their 
adoption the merchant seamen of the world have 
formally and officially placed themselves on 
record for the basic principles contained in the 
American Seamen's Act. The seamen of Italy 
and Japan, who were unfortunately not repre- 
sented at the Brussels conference, had already 
placed themselves on record for the American 
proposals at the Open Seafarers' Conference 
held during June, in Genoa, Italy. Thus the 
principal object of the American delegates' jour- 
ney to Europe has been accomplished. 

Transfer of Membership. 

The fifth point placed on the agenda at the 
instance of the American delegates dealt with 
the interchange of membership cards between 
the different organizations affiliated with the 
Seafarers' Federation. After discussion it was 
agreed "that a member of any affiliated union 
joining a vessel of another nationally, oher 
than that of the union of which he is a member, 
he should be permitted to sail for three months, 
or one voyage if longer than three months, 
without being compelled to transfer. At the end 
of three months or at the end of the voyage, 
such member be requested to transfer, but with- 
out payment of entrance fee. All contributions 
due to be the property of the union to which 
he is ransferred. 

The question of an international standard rate 
of wages was discussed at some length. Owing 
to the constant change in the rate of exchange 
between the different countries it lias become 
exceedingly difficult to make true and correct 
comparisons between rates of wages paid in 
the various countries of Europe. Thus, if the 
wages of all the seafarers in Europe were placed 
on the same level today there would probably 
be a material difference tomorrow' because of 
the ever-changing exchange value of each coun- 
try's unit of money. 

It was finally decided to refer the question of 
an international standard rate of wages to the 
Secretariat with the understanding that the 
highest rate paid in Europe be the standard rate. 

"Draft Convention" on Employment. 

On this subject Delegate I'uruselh introduced 
the following resolution: 

"Whereas, The 'draft convention' about em- 
ployment of seamen prohibits employment of 
seamen except (a) through an office maintained 
jointly by shipowners and seamen with an 
independent chairman, or (b) through an office 
under the sole control of the nation's govern- 
ment; any violation to be punished for imprison- 
ment; and 

"Whereas, There is nothing to hinder the 
shipowners from establishing offices to find men 
for their vessels; and 

"Whereas, This 'draft convention' is very 
dangerous to the seamen and their organizations 
because the latter will in all probability be 
classified as illegal employment agencies; there- 
fore he it 

"Resolved, That this conference of the Inter- 
national Seafarers' Federation protest against 
said 'draft convention' and pray that it be 
rejected by the separate nations." 

The Furuseth resolution was adopted unani- 
mously. 

Opposition to War. 

Thi delegates from France, Belgium and Hol- 
land introduced the following resolution: 

"Whereas, The people and not the govern- 
ments always have borne the brunt and burden 
ol wars; and 

"Whereas, The seamen, among the workers, 
are the most exposed to the perils of war; and 

"Whereas, .More than anyone else in the 
world, they hate armed conflicts and have the 
indomitable will to prevent in the future the 
recurrence of frightful human slaughter; 

"And now. expressing its international soli- 
darity with workingmen and confronted with 
the renewed threats of war now striking hu- 
manity, the International Congress of Seamen, 
meeting in Brussels, therefore declares, follow- 
ing the stand of the Congress of Miners, which 
met in Geneva, that a general strike shall be 
ordered in case of any new attempt to begin 
war; and further 

"Resolved, To emphasize the importance of 
this declaration, to refuse immediately to allow 
the transportation of soldiers and of war am- 
munition to the countries at war with each other 
at the present time." 

The resolution was adopted. 

The question of admitting the newly organized 
German Seamen's Union to the International 
Seafarers' Federation was discussed and inciden- 



tally the entire situation in Germany, so far as 
the seamen are concerned, came up for review. 
It was finally decided to reject the application 
for affiliation made by the new German Sea- 
men's Union and instead urge the two unions 
to get together in one organization and then 
apply for affiliation with the International Sea- 
farers' Federation. 

Amendments to Constitution 

Having in mind recent events in Europe, the 
conference amended the constitution of the 
Federation by the adoption of the following 
resolution: 

"Resolved, That any organization affiliated 
with the Federation, which without consultation 
and agreement with the other affiliated organi- 
zations, begins a strike, shall have no claim to 
assistance from the Federation." 

Since there was no end of trouble about cre- 
dentials of delegates, the following was added 
to the constitution: 

"Resolved, That no person or representative 
shall be seated with voice and vote in the meet- 
ings of the Federation unless he has creden- 
tials properly issued by his organization. 

"No proxies shall be permitted." 

The constitution was also changed as regards 
the number of men who compose the Secreta- 
riat (Executive Committee). Formerly each 
affiliated organization was entitled to one repre- 
sentative on the Secretariat. Under the amended 
constitution only one delegate from each coun- 
try will be seated in the Secretariat. In a 
country where there is more than one Seamen's 
Union affiliated with the Seafarers' Federation 
the organizations concerned will have to agree 
upon a joint representative. 

The question of affiliation with the Interna- 
tional Transport Workers' Federation was dis- 
cussed and it was finally agreed to refer that 
matter to the Secretariat. 

The resolution favoring compulsory pilotage, 
as passed at the London conference a year ago, 
was reaffirmed. 

A number of proposals from the Seamen's 
Union of Holland relating to accommodations 
aboard ship and the safety, health and comfort 
of the crew were approved. 

President Havelock Wilson and Secretary- 
Treasurer Chris. Damm were unanimously re- 
elected to their respective offices. 

Geneva, Switzerland, was elected as the next 
convention city — to take place in August, 1922. 
The reason Geneva was selected is because there 
is the headquarters of the International Labor 
< Iffice, organized under the terms of peace treaty 
and the League of Nations. 

Upon adjournment of the Brussels conference 
your delegates returned to America without 
delay. While waiting for the sailing date of 
the "Olympic," which brought us back to New 
York, we were taken to the magnificent Con- 
valescent Home for Seamen recently opened at 
• Limpsfield under the auspices of the National 
Sailors' and Firemen's Union of Great Britain 
and Ireland. For the opportunity of inspecting 
this splendid, living and serviceable monument 
to merchant seamen, and for many other cour- 
tesies and acts of kindness, we are greatly in- 
debted to the executive officers of the British 
Seamen's Union. 

In concluding, we desire to express our appre- 
ciation for the great honor conferred upon us 
in being chosen to officially represent the or- 
ganized seamen of America at these international 
conferences of merchant seamen. 

The unanimous endorsement finally given by 
the regularly elected representatives of the 
world's merchant seamen to the American sea- 
men's proposals, as set forth in this report, 
will without doubt hasten the coming of the 
day when the great fundamental principles of 
the La Follette Seamen's Act will be written in 
! the codes of every maritime nation on earth. 
Fraternally, 
ANDREW FURUSETH, 
OSCAR CARLSON, 
PAUL SCHARRENBERG 

Dated, New York, August 25, 1920. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5) 



SUB-CONSCIOUS 



It is often interesting to see how profes- 
sional high authority explains ordinary hu- 
man acts. For instance, Prof. Gilbert Murray 
of Oxford, addressing a London audience, 
said that he took the use of bad language to 
be due to a slight nervous convulsion, mo- 
mentarily destroying self-control and releas- 
ing sub-conscious interests which are nor- 
mally suppressed. 



According to the Federal Bureau of 
Education, high schools of this country 
will be short 20,000 teachers when the fall 
term opens. Salaries below the bread line 
is the cause. Organization will be the 
remedy. 



LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark Street 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Secretary 

THOS. A. HANSON. Treasurer 

Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue. Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, WIS CITAS. BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON, Agent 

74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, O S. R. DTE, Agent 

618 Front Street. Phone Bell Navarre 1823 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y J. MURPHY, Agent 

122>4 Main Street. Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 B. DAFOE, Agent 

3308 E. 92nd Street. Phone South Chicago 7666 

SUPERIOR, Wis W. EDGEWORTH, Agent 

332 Banks Avenue 

CONNEAUT, O W. J. WILSON, Agent 

992 Day Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 71 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 48 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary 

ED HICKS, Treasurer 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

Phone 428-W 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone Broad 131 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

Phone South Chicago 7666 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

Phone Bell, Navarre 1823 

CLEVELAND, 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 44 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122V 2 Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 571 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU. H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash .64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN. Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaska 

UNGA Alaska 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 188 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 

STOCKTON, Cal F. E. McFARLANE, Agent 

46 West Main Stri el 

B. C. COAST STEWARDS 

FRED WALSH, Secretary 

VANCOUVER. B. C 347 Pender Street W. 



\2 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



The Oregon conciliation board, 
acting as arbitrators, have reaffirmed 
a wage award that employing bar- 
bers asked them to review. The 
award raises rates to $28 a week. 
Where journeymen's receipts are in 
excess of $40 a week they shall be 
paid 60 per cent, of same. 

Profits of United States Rubber 
Company for the first si\ months of 
thii year were $2,559,690 larger than I 
during the same period in 1919. Net 
sales were $120,588,986 in the last 
six months, an increase of more 
than $30,000,000 over the correspond- 
ing period last year. 

Higher wages and improved work- 
ing conditions for members of the 
International Printing Pressmen and 
Assistants' Union are reported by 
officers of that organization. These 
gains are not localized, but extend 
to every section of this country 
and Canada. 

Warning to all members of or- 
ganized labor, and all citizens gen- 
erally, to register according to local 
laws is being sent broadcast by the 
executive committee of the A. F. of 
L. national non-partisan political 
campaign committee. It is urged 
that all voters at once ascertain the 
registration requirements in their 
districts or States and comply fully 
in order that all may be qualified 
to vote. 

Census of the least populous 
county in the country, Cochrane, 
Tex., was announced recently. It 
has just 67 people, two more than 
enumerated ten years ago, making 
its growth more than 3 per cent. 
Cook county. 111., including Chicago, 
probably is the most populous coun- 
ty. Its population is expected to 
exceed 3.000,000. Cochrane has :ui 
area of 869 square miles, with one 
person to approximately every thir- 
teen square miles. The county is 
located in northwestern Texas. It 
is unorganized and has not even a 
postofficc. 

The Michigan Workmen'-- Pay- 
ment Act of 1913 has been declared 
unconstitutional by the State Su- 
preme Court. The act required cer- 
tain corporations to make final set- 
tlement with every discharged em- 
ploye on or before the next i 
lar pay day following his discharge 
or pay to the employe an amount 
equal to his original wages with an 
additional 10 per cent, for each day's 
wages after the regular pay day. In 
reversing a lower court the Supreme 
Court said the law is "class legis- 
lation of the most objectionable 
kind" because it only applies to 
certain corporations. The penalty 
clause, the court avers, is "confis- 
catory and unreasonable." 

Reorganization of the Immigration 
Bureau was ordered by Assistant 
Secretary Post of the Labor Depart- 
ment, following an investigation said 
to have disclosed conditions indi- 
cating "utter disorganization" of the 
service. The shake-up. it was said 
at the Department, included not only 
the office of Commissioner-General 
Caminetti, but also the coastal sta- 
tions and the field service. Labor 
Department officials said the condi- 
tions which led to the Investigation 
were of long standing. The situa- 
tion was called to the attention of 
Caminetti by Secretary Wilson and 
the solicitor of the labor Depart- 
ment, before whom had been pre- 
sented Instanci s which they beli 
showed the disorganized state of the 
immigration service. 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wash , Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
Juring that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 

Andersen. O. -1339 
Anderson, J. -555 
Anderson, John 



Abolln, K. 
Andersen. E. A. 

-1410 
Andersen, J. F. 
Andersen, C. D. 

-1131 
Raskes, Jack 
Anderson, Karl A. 
Anderson, Gus 
Anderson, K. P. 
Anderson, H. 
Anderson, Jack 

Back, Soren 
Raumgartel, A. 
Backstrom, C. 
Ba rentes, Joe 
Ballah, Lee 
Berg, H. J. 
Berglund, Iver 
Barrington, P. 
Berger, Aug. 
Belmont, Joe 
Bergkvlat, Axel 
Bergesen. Birger 

Carlson, M. -906 
Cnrr, A. 

Campbell, John R. 
Christensen, E. O. 

H. 
Panlelsen, O. E. 
Degerstedt, Karl 
Povich, Joseph 
Donovan, J. J. 
Donnelly, P.. A. 

Edln, Gust 
Engberg, O. L. 
Engvall, J. A. 

Felsch, Chas. 
Fernandez. EHsiO 
Fpx. Andrew 
Framnes, Ivar 
Gabrielsen. Peder 
Gaughan. Tom 
Gran, Aksel 
Oravander, Nils 
Greigban, P. 

Hansen, S. P. -2794 
Hansen, Nels -2072 
Hansen, Ed. 
Hansen, Edgar 
Hansen, Oscar 
Harms, E. E 
HaltneB, M. 
Hansen, Frank 

Jonas. H. A. 
Johnson. Jack 
Johanson, C. 
Johnson, Clarence 

A. 
Jacobs, Fulton 
Johnson, E. E. 
Johnson, J. 
Johnson, Harry 
Kallo, K. 
Karlson, Ingvald 
Karlson, G. A. -1190 
Karlson, Louis 
Kasklnan, Allurl 
Kalllnan, Frank 
K. N., -1013 
Kempsen, M. 
K.-n ropy, Hueh 
Kerton, Lester 
Lampe, Fred 
Larsen, Lars 
Lambert, E. A. 
Larsen. Herman 
Laurltsen, Ludvlg 
Langman, Wm. 
Leason, J. A. 
Lllquest, Rudolf 
Martlnsen, Ingvald 
Mattson, Hildlng 
Maline, Stanley 
McLean, Angus 
McVlcar. P. 
Meyer, Frank 
Mickelson, Harry 
Mieklans, J. 
McPherson, R. 
McDonald, J. 
Nelsen, Anton 
Nelsen, H. -1460 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, N. J. 
Nellson, O. 
Oberg, J. 
Ohm. Henrlch 
Olsen, Fred A. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, E. O. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, Nick 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, K. M. 
Pettersen, Eric 
Pettersen, Kristlan 
Petersen, BJarne 
Peterson, Oscar 
Rlchardsan, J. W. 
Richardson, E. C. 
Rod, S. 
Ruhr. Hans 
Sale, John 
Saarnl, Frank 
Salvesen, T. 
Samuelsen, H. N. 
Sehurr, Harm 
Schelenz, C. 
Scott, W. N. 
SIckjnan, A. 
Slnnls, Q. 
Stmonsen, ■. 
Stmondnen. H 



Anderson, Chris 
Anderson, G. N. B. 
Andersen, Adrian 
Andersen, B. E. 
Anderson. Hllmer 
Alonzo. N. 
Axelsen, Herman 
Axelsen, George 

Bendlxon, Hans 
TVrntsen. Nils 
Bingham, Dexter 
Blomgren, Adolf 
Bllndhelm. A. E. 
Blomgren, Carl 
Boyle, Andrew 

-en, Jos. 
Brown, H. 

n, Martin 

Braun, T. 

Bunden, L. W. 

Chekan, W. 
Clifford, H. W. 
Clair, A. 
Clark. Sterling 

Dunham, Dexter 
Duncan, T. W. 
Dunne, F. 
Dutton, Henry 

Erlkson, Elner 
Erlkson, E. -38 

Franzoll, A. 
Fredriksen. B. D. 
Ferslund, Victor 

Graham, E. 
Gragan. J. H. 
Gutlsen. J. H. 
Gustafsen, Oscar 
as, Oscar 

Hansen, Tmmanuel 
Helmcr, Fred 
Herlltz. Ivor 
Hlckka, E. J 
Hasselberg. Gustaf 
Hape, Hans 
Hnopes, Bill 
Hahnqvlst, E. J. 

Johnson, Oatterd 
Johnson, Chris 

Johansen, O. 

Johnson, A. 
Johnson. John S. 
Jensen, V, J. 
.Torgensen. Adrian 
Jorgensen. D. 
Jullsen, C. A. 
Keane. John 
Klsor, Adlal 
KpIIv. John 
Klahn, Karl 
Klenk, K. A. 
Koppen, O. 
Krlstensen. N, 1093 
Krlstenten, K. 
Kukes, Conrad 
Kuten. Alex. 
Ltndholm, A. 
Llndstrom, Geo. 
Lllhurger, Wm. 
Llnne, Theodore 
Lokken. O. K. 
Lundgren, Carl 
Lund. Erik 
Lynch, J. P. 
McCoy, J. L. 
MeKenzle, Dan. 
Miller, S. 
Monrad, Trygue 
Molurg, K. G. E. 
Monroe, N. R. 
Mosley, S. E. 
Murphy, Thos. 
Muler, James 

Nelsen. Oscar 
Newman, J. S 
Nielsen, C. L. 
Norshelm, Ben 
Nordstrom, A. R. 
Olsen. Louis 
Olsen, O. -597 
Odella, V. 
Olsen, Kristlan 
Olsson, K. W. -972 
Owens. James 
O'Donnell, J. 
Person, Johan 
Peel, P. 

Peterson, John E 
Plnerd, F. H. 
Piplor.e. J. 
Prlnz, Carl 
Runsten, Arthur 
Rylander, R. 
Rysock, M. van 

Smith, C. J. 
Smeland, John 
Bommerfeld. P. L. 
Solum, M. 
Boroos, s. 
Sobel, It. 
Sterndoch. J. 
Strand, C. 
Stiilir. H. M. 
Svenson, Thure 
Svcrdrup. Walt*' 



Sjoberg, G. 
Blandart, M. 
Talee, John 
Tangvalt, G. J. 
Thornquist, A. 
Unwen, Harry 
Verst, C. A. 
Ward, Fred 
Watson, L. 
Wall. W. 
Whete, R. E. 
Williams, L. A. 
Wllhelmsen, S. 



Symons. W. A. 

Thorn, Arvld 
Thor, L. 
Thorpe, J. W. 
Vilen, I. 
Vaher, C. 
Wllhelmsen, S 
Wilson. C 
Wright, H. 
White, R. E. 
Ylonen. S. 
Yorkvelt. A. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, John 

(registered) 
Anderson, E. F. 

(registered) 
Anderson, James 
Anderson. Andrew 
Brandt, H. 

C. 
Barton. M. 
Brun, Mattlas 
Bedford, A. 
Bradsbery, Geo. 
in, Oscar 
Forsman, Niels 
Hansen, Johan G. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hanson, Halvor 
Halvorson, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Hans 



Janson, John 
Johanesen, Alf. 
Johnson, Karl 
Johannesen. 
Johanson, Emil 
Jorgensen, Jack 
Kepper, Henry 
Kinnunnen, Ant. 
Olsen, Alf 
Petersen, Hans 
Roneld, P. 
Randmets, Mike 
Risenius, Sven 
Saro, W. R. 
Smith. Carl Johan 
Toren, Gustaf 
Tourela. Brlch 
Vejvorda. Frank 
Watte!, P. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Alaska Fishermen's Letter List 

McNeill, Daniel 



Andersen, Oscar 
Anderson, Hildlng 
A. L. N. 
Bakinen, John 
BJorseth, Konrad 
Carlson, Gust 
de Blom. A. 
on, Rob 
Ertckson, John 
Groth. J. 
Hansen, Emanuel 
Hansen, Anton 
Hakanson. Ingvar 
Isakson, Erick 
Jaeobsen, Jack 
Johansen, F. C. 



Ross 
Moxnes, Chris. 
Mikelsen, P. 
Newton, A. B. 
Olofson, Charles 
Osterman. John 
Olsen, Thorn 
Olsen, John 
Ome, Tobias 
Olsen, George 
Peterson, Frank 
Rasmussen. Peter 
Skovba, Nils 
Shivers. Witt. 
Svenson. August 



Johansen. Karl W. Srhultz, Walter 



Johnson, John 
Karlson, George 
Kjerdalen, Ole 
Kristoffersen, H. O. 
Lesklnen. Fred 
Levele, Ed. 
Llndeberg. Ernest 
Lauren. William 
Lund. Frank 



Tennison, Peter 
Wamsa, August 
Peter 
Registered Letters 
CranzzI, Rosolino 
Meyer. Hans 
Miftenmeyer, J 
Rasmussen, P. 
Smith, R. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of John B. Isaacs will please notify 
Chas. F. Bullock, Marine Cooks' and 
Stewards' Association. 321 Twentieth 
street, Galveston, Texas. Matter of 
great importance. 3-31-20 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Porter" are requested to call at the 
Secretary's office for their vouchers 
for salvage services rendered to 
S. S. ''Washington" on or about 
November 5, 1919. The vouchers are 
issued to the following members, 
and the respective amounts due 
thereon is as follows: 

Amudsen, R $22.50 

Eugene, John 22.50 

Makinen, K 22.50 

Mattson, Geo. J 22.50 

Rehnstrom, A 26.25 

Sjoholm, J. W 22.50 

Any one knowing the nearest rela- 
tives of C. C. Stewart, a late member 
<d the Marine Firemen's Union of 
the Atlantic, are kindly requested to 
communicate with the Secretary of 
the above organization at 70 South 
St., Xew York, N. Y. 3-3-2C 



Rudolf Knutsson is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of h.S 
brother, J. Harvid Knutsson, a na- 
tive of Trellerborg, Sweden, agf 
20, last heard from in New York 
in April, 1918. Please address hi' 
brother, care Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific. 59 Clay street, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif 1-7-20 



Albert Nord, a native of Sweden. 
is inquired for by his brother, David 
Nord, General Postoffice, Brisbane, 
Australia. 5-19-20 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Siore No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 
Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Old Reliable Houss of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1890 

MEN'S CLOTHING, SHOES, HATg 

and FURNISHING GOODS 

108-110 Main Street Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615 617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Seamen's Outfitters 
C. P. Salmi & Co. 

Men's Furnishings 

Shoes, Hats • and Oiled Clothing 

411 EAST HERON STREET 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street • - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 
EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts,. Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 



"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST* 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM. WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of Karl Reese, age 30, last heard of 
in Iquique. Chile, October, 1916, bark 
Herbert," will please notify George 
Zimera, Sailors' Union, P. O. Box 
65, Seattle. Wash. 1-21-20 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Domlnguez Joseph Rellly, Ralph 
I Ironlund, I > ;car Rydellus, Rolp 



on, John 

Emll 
on. Walter 
II, Mlkel 
m, Fritz, 
Irf-m 
Ralnhard. H. 



Shumko. Nick 

Smith, John 

Smith, Carl 

■ H. Harold 
on, H. -121G 

Thaysen, Arthur 

Thompson, T. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Ahren, Wm. 
Andersen, A. C. 
Andersson, Axal 
Andersson, Carl 
Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson, J. A 
Anderson, Ed. 
Anderson, Gunnar 
Andersson, Bill 



l.aine, A A. 
Laine, John 
Larsen. Hans 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Larson, C. J. -1632 
I^elsig, John 
Lindner, John P. 
Lovell, G. 
Lundgren. Gust 



Anderson, Herman Malech, Frank E. 
Anderson, Carl E. Malkoff, Peter 



Austin, Ed. 
Amundsen, Ben 
Alakaihn, Moses 
Allen, I. J. 
Alsic, Karl 
Bach, Soren 
Backman, Peter 
Bieler. Ren 
Blake, Frank 
Bohm, Gust 
Bohm, Franz 



Matson. R. M. 
McCroskey, Ray A. 
McGregor. Thos. 
MeLeod, Angus 
McLean, M. R. 
Mikkelsen, Harry 
Moyer, Geo. E. 
Neilsen, H. J. 
Nelson. Nels 
Nelsson, C. 
Neuling. G. A. 



Carmelie, Guiseppe Nilsen. Christ 
Custer, Kenneth R. Norberg, John E. 
rianilson. Alhln Olsen, Michael 



Darlington, Wm. 

Dayison, Jim 

Diez. H. 

Dooly, Frank E. 

Douglas, Joseph 

Durett, J. B. 

Erickson, J. 

Erickson, Hans E. Pyne, J. W. 

Ellegard. M. Raanes, Johan 

Engler, S. H. Rader, Allen 

Enberg, Elnar Rautlo, Jack 

Fogelberry, Harry Reiman, Tovo H. 

Forsberg, Swen S. Rier, Earl W. 



Olson, T. 
Olson, John 
Pederson. Geo. 
Peterson, Mauritz 
Petersen. Knut 
Pehte, Frank L. 
Preston. E. 



Fugman, Arthur 
Gllklson, A. F 
Golden, Roy L. 
Graff, John D. 
Oronbeck, H. 
Gruber, J. 
Halley, W. 
Hanson, August 



Robertson, E. J. 
Robles. Frank 
Ross, Geo. 
Salne, Arthur A. 
Salonen. Victor 
Salin, Toivo H. 
Sandvik, S. G. 
Scott. M 



Hanson, Oskar W. shalin, Nils 

Hardie, Wallace Sibley, M. 

Hogstrom. Karl I. 

Hoiland, E. A. 

Heino. Gust 

Henrlkson, Geo. 

Huber. Charles S. 

Hurley, Michael 

Irmey, Feodor 

Jacobs, Fulton 

Jernberg, Alfred 

Jespersen, Martin 

Johnson. Emil 



Johanson, S 
Johnson. Louis 
Jones, E. L. 
Kalfholm, Edw. 
Knuko. Axel 
Kelly, Norman 
Kennedy, B. L. 
K.jellberg, A. C. 
Klaver, R. 
Krause, Frank 
Kristiansen, Wm. A. 



Sinclair, P. 

Smith, Carl J. 
Slade, I. S. 
Spencer. T^m 
Stout. R. E. 
Sutse, Michel 
Svansson. Ernest 
Taylor, Bert 
Thomson, Henry 
Thorsen, Chas 
Tinstrom, A. R. 
Tuhkanen, John J. 
Walmoupb, P. 
Walter, E. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Wikstrom, Carl 
Willis, Samuel 
Wood, E. E. 
Wolf, Herbert 
Walters, Fred L. 
Worn, Otje 



San Pedro Letter List 



Aho, Jack 
Andersen, J. -.157 
Anderson, C. 
Andersen. C 
Anderson, Sven 
Arentsen. Jo tin 

A rn*>«en \*nk 

Aspe, Theodor 
.Belmont, ln» 
Bentley, Clifford 
Bengtsson, Sigfried 
Rergeson, B. 
Berglund, Emil J. 
Bergstrom. .1 
Brast, Sjomans 
Braden, W. A. 
Beschorner, Robert 
Brown, Irving W. 
Bye, Kristian 
Burge, Larence 
Cage, Tom 
Carlsson, Chas. 
Carlera. Peter 
Carr, R. W. 
Craig, Thomas 
Cowan, Wm. L. 
Church, C. E. 
1'avis. Orville 
Daw, Walter 
Deaver AJv'" 
Desmond,, Albin 
Doty, Erwin 
Daunt, C. 
Dreger, Jack 
Dragich, Peter 
ureiiiian, v\ N. 
Eliasen, John 
Ek. William 
England. Thomas 
Evans. Wllbert 
Evensen, Alex 
Farrell. H. D. 
Feeder, Geo. 
Fickle Omer 
Fottinger, Karl A. 
Kolvlk. Ludvlg 
For'lo. \ If red 
Frair, Enoch 
Ki I'iberg, P. 
Franzell, A. H. 
Kreiiag, F. 
Gayton, H. L. 

(•.,;,«-, ,n I"* 

Gronthal. Arthur 
Golden, Roy 
uunnerud, LJlrlk 

[Tnnopn 0***f 

Hellsten, G. 



Hermanson, Carl 
Holland. Jonnie 
Hermanson, ('ail 
Hey, Ben. 
Hickey, John 
Hogstedt. Chas. 
Houston. Robert 
Hurley, Michael 
.Tacobsen, Jack -2445 
Jacobsen, Tom 
Janofy, Axel 
Jensen, Marius 
Jensen. Kristian 
Jeeden, George 
Johnson, Carl 10. 
.Tohansen, Anton 
Johansen, Julian W. 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen, J. -1432 
Johnson. G^org' 
Johansen, J. -2314 
Johnson, P. -2313 
Johnson, Waldron 
Jonassen, Johannes 
Keel, Jewell 
Kelty. Peter 
Kenrich, Richard 
Ketelsen, Freak. 
Keegan, J . 
Klieman, Otto 
Klementsen, Alf 
Kootz, Fred 
Knndser 4nn*rew 
Kruse. Henry 
Kristoffersen, Han^ 
I.aine John 
Landhorg. Chas 
Larsen. Johan -l. r >42 
Lauritzen, Ole 
Levine, Carl 
Lindholm. Chas. 
LIU. Karl 
Lind, Gustav 
Llndstrom, John 
Llndeberg. Ernest 
Lowrey, John R. 
Lodersen, John 
Lorgeman. Fred 
J/Obeles, Jose 
Lund, P. v. -2(il0 
Lucander, Hjalmar 
Maahs v\ 1 1 1 1 
Magnussen, John 
Martinson 1 - 'H*l 
Mato. Alexandi-r 
McNeill. John 
McGhee, K. J 
McRae, Jack 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 



SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 

Prices 



All work done in 

our own sanitary 

workshop 

Represented by £ PEQUILLAN 



Established 
for 20 years 



Books for You 
While at Sea 

ADVENTURE — SEAMANSHIP 
ROMANCE— HISTORY— TRAVEL 
SCIENCE— GREAT MEN'S LIVES 

Books to Help You Spend Idle Hours in a 
Pleasant and Worth While Way 

For a Free Crew's Library 
Exchangeable at Any Time 

Apply to 

American Library Association 

34 Sacramento Street San Francisco 

Phone Sutter 6985 

Or to other A. L. A. Agencies in Almost Any American Port 

These books are provided free for your use by the people 
of the United States through the American Library Association. 

When you have finished with them, they may be exchanged 
for another collection at any office of the American Library 
Association, or they may be exchanged for any A. L. A. collection 
on board another boat. 

In fairness to the men on the next ship receiving this collection 
you should take reasonable care to prevent loss or damage to 
any book. 



Mize, J. H. 
Mehrtens. Carl 
Moor, Peter 
Monson, Edvin 
Moritz, W. 
Murphy, Francis J. 
Nauta. H. 
Nankinen. Fr«-d 
Nelson, Ernest 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nelson. Gus 
Nilsson, Edward 
Ogren, Victor E. 
Olofsen, O. A. 
Olsen. Ole 
Olsen. Harold 
Olsson otto 
Pett, Dick 
1 • icrsen, Hugo 
Peterson, August 
Raaum. Harry 
Rasmnssen. Swend 
Roherts, Bob 
Roberts. J. W. 
Robertson, E. 
Robinson, Fred C. 
Rod Halfdan 

Rossdam, Harry 

Rohman. Pete 
Runge, R. 
Rueter. Amnndns 
PahUserg. TJnrlnlf 
Sanders, Chas. 
Snndberg. N. A. 
Saxby, Charles 
Sandstrom. O. H. 
Salin, Henry 
Schladen. H. 
Scaharrv. Ja en >> 
Si li.Mimberg. W. 
Scottol, Andrew 



Scrivers, W. 
Seland, Hans 
Smith. Carl Johan 
Soder, Paul 
Strehle, F. 
Strauss, Walter 
Steen. Ivar 
Stensland. Paul 
Strom, Oscar 
Stenberg. Alfred 
Sterndock. 'nhn 
Steffensen, Hans 
Sundquist, Walter 
Sunde, O. 
Sullivan. Jack 
Swindells, William 
Swanson, Mr. 
Swanson, Eric K. 
Thomsen, Thomas 
Treiberg, Peter 
Veckenstedt. W. 
Visoarra, Oscar 
Voth, Gus 

Wenneroulst. Antnn 
Wilhelmson, Karl 
Winkelman, Otto 
Wilson. John 
Woods, Claude F. 
Wrobluvski. Paul 
Zimmerman. Frit? 
Zunde-""- T h»". 
Packages 
Hansen, Oscar W, 
Nahinen, Fred 
Kolierson. Ole 
Erickson, E. R. 
Nanhinon. Fred. 
Peters 1 M 
Pinnington. H. D. 
Young, William 
Zoerb, Walter 



INFORMATION WANTED 



■*• 






Home 


News 


* 


• 



The Centrale Bond Van Trans- 
portarbeiders have placed in my 
hands claim of the father and 
mother of L. Verhoef, seaman who 
met his death on the S. S. "Balosaro" 
April 29, 1920. An old spring line 
broke, curled around Verhoef's left 
leg and yanked him on to the winch 
while lie was operating it. Refore 
it could be stopped his leg was taken 
off. lie died two hours later at the 
I" pital. Will members of the crew 
report here promptly. The 
master has made an entry in the log 
book td the effect that the deceased 
met with his death through intoxi- 
cation, which statement we believe 
to he utterly false. I am acting 
the dependent relatives. It is the 
duty of seamen to tell the truth 
Your dependents maj I"- in the same 
position some day. — S. B. Axtell. 

8-25-20 



Captain W. W. Gilmer, naval 
Governor of Guam, who recently 
issued an order making whistling on 
the island punishable by a $5 fine, 
has been relieved and Captain John 
C. Wettengel appointed. Secretary 
Daniels said the whistling order had 
no bearing on the action taken. 

"The famine price of white paper" 
has forced the American Red Cross 
to discontinue publication of the 
Red Cross Magazine. "Further pub- 
lication would involve either con- 
siderable increase in the subscrip- 
tion price or a subsidy from the 
general funds of the society, which 
deems either course inexpedient." 
The October number will be the 
last. 

A sharp drop in wool consumption, 
amounting to approximate 17,000,000 
pounds in June, as compared with 
the average consumption for the pre- 
ceding months of this year, was an- 
nounced by the Department of Agri- 
culture's bureau of markets. The 
drop was due, the bureau said, to 
the curtailment of operations in the 
textile manufacturing industry, re- 
sulting from lack of orders, cancella- 
tions and deferred shipments. 

The Bureau of Vital Statistics has 
announced the death at Rig Laurel, 
I Madison County, N. C, of Miss 
: Dorcas Griffin, aged 117. She 
. was born on March 20, 1803, accord- 
ing to the family Bible record. 

A nation-wide drive to round up 
draft deserters will be inaugurated 
by the War Department within the 
next few weeks with the publication 
I of a slacker list containing, accord- 
ing to the present records, 173,911 
names. 

More than 5000 immigrants are 
arriving daily at Ellis island, the 
Department of Labor announced. 
Despite unfavorable conditions, ap- 
proximately 800.000 immigrants ar- 
rived during the twelve months ended 
June 30, as compared with 141,132 
during the corresponding period the 
year before, and the record of 1,285,- 
389 in 1907. Foreign steamships have 
reported all available accommoda- 
tions for a year in advance have 
been booked. 

Development work is being pushed 
steadily on at the Wilshire gold 
mine, Rishop, Cal., with the purpose 
of furnishing the mill a steady sup- 
ply of ore at the rate of 150 tons a 
day by October 1. At present sixty 
men are employed. Ore develop- 
ment is reported by President Gay- 
lord Wilshire to continue favorable, 
with a continuous ore body on 
second level. 420 feet long by 15 
feet wide, with ore in both faces. 
Gold values average about $11 to 
the ton. 

Wholesale prices of commodities 
declined approximately 2 l / 2 per cent. 
during July, according to a report by 
the Department of Labor. The de- 
crease in clothing and clothing ma- 
terials was the most notable shown 
in the department list of index num- 
bers, amounting to 5'/2 per cent., 
while foodstuffs declined 4 per cent, 
and farm products 2.9 per cent. At 
this point, the department reported, 
prices were still above levels of 
July, 1919, food articles having in- 
creased during the year 24.1 per 
cent., clothes and clothing 12.4 pet- 
cent, and fuel and lighting 47.4 per 
cent. Fuel and lighting matei 
increased by 2 1-3 per cent, dui 
July, 1920, making their current 
the more disproportionate to other 
commodities. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Japanese ship owners told the 

United States Shipping Board rep- 
resentative in a conference at Kobe 
that the Japanese would accept the 
proposal to raise freight rates to the 
American level. 

The American four-masted schooner 
■•Mary E. Palmer" is reported in a 
dispatch from Casa Blanca, Ma- 
rocco, to have run aground on the 
African coast. All members of the 
crew are said to be safe. The 
"Mary E. Palmer" sailed from 
Galveston May 26 for Tunis. The 
vessel is of 1377 tons. 

The following ocean-going vessels 
entered the port of Montevideo dur- 
ing May, according to the port 
statistics: British, 90; Italian. 25; 
American, 18; Norwegian, 14; French, 
13; Brazilian, 12; Spanish, 7; Jap- 
anese, 5; Dutch, 4; German, 4; 
Uruguayan, 3; Belgian. 3; all others, 
27. This made a total of 22'? v< 
for this port, excluding river boats 
plying between Montevideo and ad- 
jacent cities. 

Agitation for a line of French 
steam packets connecting South 
Africa with Marseille and other 
European ports is making great head- 
way, according to a dispatch from 
the "Cape Argus," South Africa- M. 
Jore, French consul to South Africa, 
strongly advocates such a scheme, 
and states that it would open up 
commerce with the rich unexploited 
regions of Africa to such an extent 
that Marseille could undoubtedly re- 
gain the mercantile supremacy it lost 
to Hamburg through the aggressive 
German merchant marine system. 

During the first five months oi 
1920 there were entered at the port 
of Nantes 329 vessels engaged in the 
foreign trade, of which 15 were sail- 
ing vessels and 314 steamers. Of 
the 15 sailing vessels. 12 were of 
French nationality, 2 Norwegian and 
1 American. Of the 314 steamers, 
85 were French, 84 British, 65 Nor- 
wegian, 14 interallied, 12 Danish, 9 
Greek, 8 Belgian, 7 American, 7 
Swedish, 6 Dutch, 4 Spanish, 5 Bra- 
zilian, 3 Rumanian, 3 Russian, 1 
Chilean and 1 Japanese. The 329 
Vessels entered discharged at X'aulo 
731.473 tons of cargo, of which 198,- 
734 tons were brought in British ves- 
190,290 tun- in French vessels, 
142,606 tons in Norwegian. 29,673 
tons in Brazilian, _'8.67(> tons in Dan- 
ish, 27.914 tOWS in Greek, 27.7M tons 
in interallied and 16,939 tons in 
American vessels. 

Recommendations have been made 
to the Government by a specially 
appointed commissioner relative to 
improving the harbor and docks at 
Jamaica. The proposed im- 
rnents would inch 
channel 50(1 feet wide to depth of 40 
feet below water of ordinary S] 
tides, suitably buoyed from the exist- 
ing ship channel near Fort Augusta 
tci 1 'iii- No. 1; lengthening Pier N"". 1 
by 300 feet and widening the west- 
ern side to give access for 
carts ami railway wagons to the 
new pier head and driving steej 
-beet piling alongside the pier to 
permit dredging; and erecting a new 
shed. It is estimated that 
this work will cost $630,000, divided 
Follows: New channel, $410,000; 
lengthening Pier No. 1, $140,000; 
widening Pier No. 1 and putting 
heet pilin l)000; new 

cargo shed. $20.(iiH). 
Labor News 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH .Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 

Deposits 63,352,269.17 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent funds 2,488,107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund 330,951 .36 

OFFICERS 
JOHN A. BUCK, President 
GEO. TOURNY. Yi. c-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 
E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 
A. H. MULDER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 
a. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. DAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch 
W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 
O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER K. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

E. A. CHR1STENSON L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys 



San Francisco Letter List 

Members whose man Is advertised in 
these columns should at one* notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manager, The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 



Adolfsson, John 
Allison. Beniamin 
Almon, L. 
Altoncn, Carl 



Dahlgren, Win. 
Davis. Warren 
DeGuire, Ray 
DeMario, Thos. 



Hobbs, Frank A. Klanke, Kenneth 
Hobbs, Frank M. Klemmetsen, Alt'. 
Hoffman, Ferdinand Klemmensen, Eddy 
Hoglander, Martin Klimon, Otto 



Homminell, Geo 
Hollkamp, C. 
Holbrook, G. A. 
Holdaway, C. G. 
Hood, Alex 
Huberts. Emil 
Huter, Chas. 



Kluge, Martin 

B. R. 
Knuttson, Rudolf 
Kolustow, A. 
Kooistram, Sam 
Kraal, J. 
Krausem, Wm. 



Andersen, O. -2099 Demorest, C. E. 
Andersen, Chas. Delaney, G. 



Theo. 
Andersen, N. F. 
Andersen, S. P. 
Andreasen, H. 

1477 
Andersen, H. 
Anderson, A. G. 

-J 110 

Anderson, Frank 

Ainiei son. [ngmar 

Anderson, Johan 

Andersson, C. -2001 Duis, John 

Andersson, C. J. Dumas, C. 

Andersson, G. A. 
Andersson, G. S. 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, Julius 
Andersson, O. L. 

-1363 
Andersson, 
-797 



Dell, E. O. 
1 )eMar, Tho. 
Dietz, Arnold 
Dlttman, Rudolf 
Domke, Willi 
Donnelly, George F. 
Drange, F. 8. 
Drennen, W. N. 
Dommelen, G. J. 
Dreyer, Jack O. 
Duarte. John 



Dunwoody, G, 
Dushane, Matt 

Eaton, Lawrence 
Eckleberry, H. 
Bide, B. 

Elde. W. 
C. B. Ekeland, I. 

Eklof 
Arneson, Aug. Ellingscn, Harold 

Asm, Gustav Ellis, F. L. 

Attaberry, Clarence Endemann, M. 
Augustin, H. Ennus. Pito 

Aylward, Ja Erlandson. K. B. 

Even, Frank 
l.i ke, C. V. Bvensen, Andrew 

. H. L. 
-. Morris Fagerherg. Ivan 

Bandel, Curt Fagerly, O. 

Hang, Oscar Enevoog. C. M. 

Baptiste, Lawr. rrell, Reman. I 

Baris, N. Fellman, Geo. E. 

Barlow, R. Fi.k. Max 

Behni, W. A. Fjellman, George 

Bendixen, Hans Fletcher. Jos. 

Bergstrom, G. A. Freese, Paul 
Beschorner, Robert Fredricksen. O. 
Bews. James Fredricksson, F. ( '. 

Bjorklund, Gotfrld Frost, Peter 



Frances 
Block, Paul 
Rlomgren, C. A. 
Blomgreen, A. 
Bloom, Pete 
Boerner, P. F. 
Borgeson, Hllding 
Botsford, R, D. 
Boyland, O. J. 
Bratt, A. W. 
Brander, Wm. 
Brauner, C. \. 

in, Karl 
Broomhead, R. 
Broshear, A. O. 
Brown, H. W. 
Bryning, Wm. 
Bryning, Walter 
Buckner, Chas. 
Burgraff, Alb. 
Burke, Gunnar 

Callahan, Patrick 

n, Sverre 
Carlson, August 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Carlson, John 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, G. -776 

Carlson, Magnus P. Hangers, H. -1980 

Carlson, O. -1839 Handley, Chas. 

Carlson, Peter Hansen. Antonius 

Carlsson, J. Hansen. Hans M. 

Carlsson. John -861 Hansen. II. O. 

Carpenter, Harold Hansen, H. F. 

Cavanaugh. H. K. Hansen, Knud 

Chaplin. Eddie J. Hansen. Harold 

Chili ott, Geo. Hansen, S. P. 

tensen, C. D. Hansen. Carl 

-1042 Hansrhman. Wm. 

Christian, Jim Hanson. Olaf 

Christen. Bruno Harbst, J. D. 
Christensen, Jorgen Hartwlg. W. 

-1731 Harris. T L. 

Christensen, Martin Harvey, Earl S. 

Clarke, Matthew Haunt. C. 



Fuller, Coo. E. 

Ganser, Joe 
Gardell, Joe 
Gardes. F. J. 
Germenis, Socrates 
Gonzales, O. J. 
Graham, Ray 
Grainge, Arnold 
am, Thos. 
Grady. Will. A. 
Granberg, Fred 
Gregory, M. N. 
Green, Lawrence 
Griffin, I. R. 
Grin felt, Geo. 
Gullaksen, Hans 
Gunderson, H. T. 
W.^utmann, Paul 'J 
M. -1131 

Hagemeyer, Gus 
Haeen. Horace 
Haider, Henry 
Hale, Klngsley 
Halllt, Frank 
Halvorsen, Erling 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Hammond. Rohprt 



Clausen, Louis 
Clever, Hugo 
Clug, Fredrick 
Cobb, Ralph H. 
Cnlman. J. 
Conley, Irwin 
Cooper, C. E. 
Coulyou, Joseph 
Culman, F. 

Dahis, Ogden 



Heln, M. 

Heis, G. L. 
Heis, J. S. 
Heldal, Trygve 
Helden, H. van 
Hessin, B. 
Heaps. James 
Hereld, J. M. 
Helllkson. H. 
Heyen, Horace 
Heywood, D. L. 



Huber, C. L. 
Hunter, Ernest 
Huggins, P. A. 
Hughs, Tom 

Ibsen, Christian 
Ireland, H. 
[sakson, k 

Jacobsen, E. Th. 



S 4C Krlstofferson, A. B. 
Kron, A. H. 
Kruger, G. -934 
Kruse, Einar 
Kuron, Hemming 

Laine, Arthur A. 
Laine, Kasper 
idrld. R. 
Lange, Henry 

Langrnann, Wm. 



Jacobsen', Herman Lanphear, D. 

Iihrilt,- Paul Larsen. Lambert 

Larsen, Slgruid 
Larsen, G. -2297 



2012 



Larsen, John 
Larsen, G. B. 
Larsson, L. H. 
Larrsson, Jack 
Lau, Gustav 

. John A. 
Lehtonen, Hj. O. 
Leraa, Angel 
Lesklnen, F. A. 
Lewis, Albert M. 
Liesen, W. 



Jainike. Richard 
Jakullis, John 
Jansson, A. L. 
Jansson, Fred. 
Janson, John A. 
Jansson, HJ. 
Jansson, John 
Jarvinen, Johan 
Jennl, Jaek A. 
Jens, Otto 
Jensen, E. -1987 
Jensen, Chas. Chr. 
Jenson, Jens 

a, Klaus , 

■!:::;;::!!• p;,; 1 ' - 2708 uSaegStnt*. 

' ■' : sen M Ltadqutot, Chas. S. 

Johannsen . Carsten iToewende Nicholas 
.lohansen, Eilert r „»„,.„„ i, 

Johansen, P. -880 {'", = '' V,}' 
Johannesen, Johan-J^ E B dw ' L 

Johfnsen. Anton ^nd^A H A. rman 

J i°Jh a n n .»^ sen H J ' ^Lundaulet, Ralph A. 
Johnsen, H. -2213 Lych H 

on, E. -2715 Lydersen. Peder 
Johanson, H. 

Johansson, Gustav Maalo, Rasmus 
Johnson. A. Emil MacLeod. Norman 
Johns. .n, Carl -2783 Makares. S. J 
Johnson, Bdw. Mannonen, Niels 

Johnson. E. L. Mandmetz, Michael 

Johansson. Bemad Manzano, Luis 
Johnson, Walter Marker. Andrew 

Jonsson, J. H. -2951 Marshall. Ira 

risen, Johannes Martinsen. Ingvald 
Jorgensen, F. ;toSi Mario P. 

Josephson. Ben Mahaffey, Cecil 

Joyce, Daniel Mathlsen, Hans 

Judd. Jack Mattson, Hilding 

Jungstrom, William Mattson, Victor 
Junfpor, Foetor P. McCoy, J. L. -2904 



Kaav eland, T. 
Kaarnbach, Hugo 
F. 
i, Frank 

Kalli.i. P. A. 



McEvoy, Peter 
AfcCallum, Chas. 
McClintic, Frost 
McCarthy, Harood 
McManus, Peter 
ler, Gustaf 



Karlson, G. A. -1190 Meyers j E 
Karlsson, E. - 739 Midgette, F.ank W. 



Karlsson, Gustaf 
Kasperson, E. 
Keinast, Mike 
Kenansky, Adam 
Keller, Wm. 
Kierne, G. H. 
Kililinaii, Gunnar 
Klne, Conrad 
King. Allan 
Kinnie, E. J. 
Kirby, Geo. 



Mikelsen, Bern. 
Miller, R. E. 
Mlllert, Carl 
Moberg, Alf. 
Mol. J. W. 
Moller, Fritz 

n, Thomas 
Morlts, W. 
Morris, Francis 
Moore, H. ii. 
Morris, Jimmie 



Morrison, Donald 
lltoulas, Nil 

Murray, E. J. 

Nannestad, Arthur 
Nelson, A. B. 

. J( lome 
Nelson, Nils E. 
Nelson, Steve 
Nelson, C. -302 
Nelson, C. R. 
Nesson. Ralph 
Neumann, ll. 4121 

.mas 
Newton, A. 
Nickerson, Phillip 
Nlklasson, Justus 
Nilsen, Martin L. 
Nilsson, Emil 
Nil ss. in, Edward 
Nielsen, Jens 
Nilsen, Hans L. 
Nilsson, John 
Nilsson, K. L, 
Nolen, 

Ni.i.i. Clai in. e W. 
Nordqulst, ( Itto 
Nordstom, Hans 
Nordenberg, Alf. 
Nordgren, Ragnar 
Nordlund, Albert 
North. Jesse I. 
Numinelin, Arthur 
Alex 

Oad, John 

i ry 
i ihlsson, Hj. 
Ogren, V. E. 
1 I'Leary, Patric 
i tlsen, Fred 
i ilsen, Magnus 
i ilsen, Ole 

Svedrup B. 
i ilsen, Wm. J. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen. C. -1412 
i ilsen, Eugene 
I llson, I larald 
Olson, Ed. 
i mil.., Tobias 
ind, John 
Osborne, E. T. 
Osborne, James 
Ozolin, Jan 

Page. J. N. 
l'aksis. T. 
Parker, Bert 
Parrish, Arthur L. 
Pearson, Edw. 
l 'edersen, U 
i 'edersen, I .. -M. 
I '.i i son, Albert 
iviini'., Jam 
l 'etersen, Axel L. 

i I'.jarne A. 
I 'eti i Ben, Jens 
Peterson, Henry 
Peterson, O. -1595 
Pilklnton, Homer 
Post, Albei t 
Potter, E. R. 
Price. Arthur 

li, A. 
I ublicatus, A. 
l'unis, Tony 
Ramasse, Joe 
Enrique 



Rosenberg, L. F. K. 
Roth, M. 
Rubins, Ch. 

Butler. Amandus 
Ryan, Patrick 
S.aarinen. K 
Saharoff. John 
Sampson, Carl 
Samuelson, E. -2888 
Samuelson. Mentor 
Sanders. Osea r 
Sanne, Rudolf 
Sanjer, Sajer 
Saunders. Dewev A. 
S. anion. David P. 
Schmees, ll. rman 

lidt, B. H. 
S. hneidau, Heinriih 
S. -1 1 reft, Paul 

holm, J. R. 
Seiffert, John 
Selvert, Albert 
„„. Selenski, Frank 
"k"' Sexton, Harry J. 
Shipley. A. M. 
Si. ins, Lewis 
Sierist. (jeorge 
Simpson. Joseph II. 
Sinnes, K. E. 
Skngman. W. 
erg, Silas 
Skaar, Oska r M. 
Slattery, Harry 
Small, E. R. 
Smedsvig. O. B. 

. John H. 
Smith. Geo. B. 
Smith, A. G. 
Solberg, Bernt P. 
Soneson, Wllhelm 
Sorensen, Jorgen II. 
Sovdsnes, O. Peter- 
sen 
Spence, O. L. 
Stanford, Harry 
Steinberg, John 
Stensland. Paul 
Sterchy, Jack 
Stone, Mervyn 
Stout, R. E. 
Stragseth, Svend 
Strurh, O. 
Stang, A. 
Stenensen. A. 
Stewart, William 
Stone, WIcktor 
Rtrandbere. O. 
Svengard. J. 
Swinka. Albert 
Tacie, John 
Tallaksen, Arthur 
Tan. H. erg, Einar 
Takkls, John 
Taylor, Sam C. 
TaIWbod Kmll 
Thomas. Johnie 
Thomas, Nelson 
Thomasen, Olaf 

Thompson. Clifford 
Thomsen, Chr. 
Thorn, Arvid 
Thomas, Frank 
Thomas, Fred 
Thomphson, James 
Thompson, J. W. 
Tillman, Chas. 
Timmers, n P. 
Tingstrom. A. R. 



Rasmusen. Rudolpf Tjei slan.l. Sv.rre 
Rasmussen, Aksel Tohtz, R. C. 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rasmussen, Kail \". 
I -uois 



dson, Kilu in 
Killukka, John 
Rier. E. W. 

}, Tlios. G. 
Rollo, R. 
Rommel. Andrew 
Uonn, E. 
Rose, J. 
Boss, H. E. 



Torson. Andrew 

1, R. 
Trykin, Gustaf 
Tucker, Harold J. 
Tufty, C. J. 
Turner, W. A. 

Vargas, Martina 
Vierr, W. 

Vitek, Edward 
Vitol, A. 

Wapper. John 



PACKAGES 



Allison, Ben 
Barlow, Robt. 
Blake, L. 
Booshard, H. 
Breeze. J 
Churman, W. C. 
Cornell usen, M. 
I '.-u Pree, E. 
Earls. Joe 
Egan, John 
Engstrora, Edw. 
Frlzsell. Riley 
Fiey, Peter 
Ganser, Joe 
Garrick, J. B. 
Goodman. Tony 

In, J. R. 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Henrikson, Ernst 
, Frank A. 
Hoglander, M. 
Holmes. G. 0. 
Jansonu, C. J. W. 
Johnson, John 

nsen, Jorgen 
Kallio, F. 

Kalning, P. G. -1342Wallin, V. O. 
Ketelsen, Fred Williams, J. D 

Kraiser, R. 



LaMadrld, Rafael 
Larsen, J. -2012 
Larson, Axel 
Lehto, Oscar 
Liljedal. L. 
I.indgren, E. 
Locke, J. E. 
Lundquist, Ralph 
Malmin, T. 
.Mathis, Hartley H. 
MePherson, R. 
Mortensen, K. A. 
Mortensen, BJarne 
Navarrete, Joe 
Newman, L. O. 
Nordlund. Albert 
Pattersen, Frank 
Pedersen, Anders 
Perks, Fred 
Sorensen, Jos. E. 
Stetnica, Carl 
Stranberg, P. 
Tillsten, Jack 
Travers 

van Vleet, F. B. 
Wahtje, W. H. 




FRANK M. NESTROY 



Phone Kearny 5361 THE ARGONAUT TAILORS UNION 



TAILOR 



We do Master Tailoring on Suits, Overcoats and Uni- 
forms for men who desire to dress and look superior. 
We carry the largest selection of imported and do- 
mestic woolens. Quality and workmanship guaranteed. 
MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 

268 MARKET STREET 

Conducted by Capt. Chas. Ehlers 

Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

300 Rooms at 50 cents per day, 
$2.50 to $3.00 per week, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL, LUNDGREN. Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



— Phones — 

Office, Fkln 7756 Residence, Rand 27 

Office Hours, 9:30 a. m. to G p. m. and 

7 to 8 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9:30 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

Liberty Honds accepted in exchange for 

dental work 

2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Golden Gate 

and Taylor Streets, San Francisco 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 
Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



19 East Street, Foot of Ferry Bridge 

Wholesale— OUTFITTER— Retail 

Everything for the man that goes to sea 

SEAMEN AND FISHERMEN 

GEO. A. PRICE 



v. s. 

Sea Boots 



IS RIGHT 

Navy 
Flannels 



Tower's 
Oil Skins 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer^ Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall Bros. 


Express 


Stand and Baggage Room 


— at — 




212 EAST ST., San 


Francisco 


Phone Douglas 


5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two Individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

7*3 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MAC-ARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5 

UNIFORMS & SUITS, TO ORDER & READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 

36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



SAVE MONEY ON YOUR SHOES 

Would you walk one-half block from Market Street to 

Save $1 to $3? 

We are located at 58 Third 
St., San Francisco. 

We arc agents for — 

W. L. Doug/as 
Just IV right 
Walk Ease 

Strong & Garfield 

We can positively save 
you money by buying 
your S I I < )ES from us. 

Our low rent and small 
expense make it possible 
for us to sell cheaper 
than the Market Street 
stores paying six times 
our rent. 

We are showing a most exclusive and large stock of men's 
shoes, \\ e can lit any foot and suit any fancy. 




PRICES 



58 THIRD STREET 

Between Market and Mission 

San Francisco, Cal. 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 1804) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. T. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full Information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietor* 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCItCO 



SMrMr"FD<5 See that this label ( in light blue ^ a P pears on the 
1V1 vy JV !-■ K. ^ box in which you are served. 

Issued by Authority oi the Cigar Makers Internal a I Union of Amenta 

g-^. Union-made Cigars. 

$\ jKUaC/IOf !Hf OCMKiMKl'lltTIRMTIOIUl UNION* »1WK4. jn woinuMioe dfyolfU t»th» »C| 

pi v«K»tBtoftheMOI!*MAllRIA.ir.d.HluiMii»l*(U»l>[0f THt CRATf. Iteufwt m .'rmw 
■*V *j>T"/i<£f Jiliirra^timiUu»oB<hi»U<m«i f b« punned »«w*«tt»U». 

Q. yr. til*iun4. A**** 

V C U I U of Amrna 



t 


♦ 


News 


from Abroad 


* 


a 



A dispatch from San Jose, Costa 
Rica, says Congress has passed a 
law giving the right of suffrage to 
all citizens, including women. 

The Chilean Government has bought 
the battle-ship "Canada" and four 
light cruisers from the British Gov- 
ernment, and it is rumored that six 
British destroyers of the 900-ton type 
are to be purchased. 

All leading Moslem religious au- 
thorities in Anatolia have approved 
a proclamation, dated August 3, 
which has been sent broadcast in 
Anatolia, declaring the principles of 
bolshevism are identical with Islam- 
ism, because "based on democracy." 
It calls on all good Moslems to 
accept the tenets of bolshevism. 

A large number of the Royal 
Irish Constabulary at Dublin in- 
formed the commandant that they 
were unwilling to be used to sup- 
press political opinion, says the Dub- 
lin correspondent of the Central 
News. They took off their uniforms 
and left the depot in civilian cloth- 
ing. 

Recall by the Japanese Govern- 
ment of all Japanese who have emi- 
grated to the United States has been 
suggested by prominent citizens of 
Tokio as a means of solving the 
Japanese problem in America, says 
a Tokio cablegram to Nippu Jiji, 
vernacular newspaper in Honolulu. 
The cablegram adds that the Tokio 
press is supporting the proposal. 

Representatives of all shipping 
lines operating out of Japanese ports, 
in conference at Yokohama, have de- 
cided that the standard freight rate 
for ocean traffic will be 20 per cent, 
higher than at present. R. O. 
Baker, representing the United States 
Shipping Board, proposed a fifty 
per cent, increase, but Japanese del- 
egates refused to agree. 

The Japanese military authorities 
at Nikolaevsk, on the left bank of 
the Amur river, in Asiatic Russia, 
have issued an announcement that 
all Russian fisheries in the estuary 
of the Amur have been taken under 
Japanese control, according to a 
Vladivostok dispatch to the Russian 
News Agency. Russians desiring to 
lease fisheries must comply with 
Japanese demands, it is added. 

Polish emigrants for America to 
the number of 750 have been stopped 
by the Danzig authorities on the 
Polish frontier on the pretense that 
many of them were of military age 
and might be used in the warfare 
against the Bolsheviki, says a Berlin 
dispatch to the London Times. Two 
hundred of the party are children 
under 10, and there are many women 
in the group. The Berlin dispatch 
says there is much suffering among 
them. 

Newspapers of Petrograd publish 
a speech by Nikolai Lenine, Soviet 
Premier, in which lie expressed an 
uncompromising policy toward for- 
eign countries, say advices. He de- 
clared Russia must continue to fo- 
ment revolution in all countries until 
she achieves her aim, an international 
"proletarian Soviet republic." Am 
and the East are the chief present 
hope, Lenine continued, and it is 
there Russia must show her strength. 
He declared that in England the 
worst foe was the opportunist aris- 
tocratic working class, and Soviet 
Russia's aim should be to strengthen 
tin- i i umiiimist miiioril \ tgai ' this 
class. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



♦ 


—i> 


With 


the Wits 


A . » 



"They say now that there mast be 
a law passed for the arrest of parlor 
Bolshevists." 

"Who's to <lo the arresting— the 
kitchen police?"— Wichita E 



Sid Doun— Why are silk shirts a 
luxury? 

Stan Dupp — Because you pay $10 
for them and your coat and vest 
cover all but a nicklc's worth. — 
California Pelican. 



"Who's the Congressman who 
looks so important?" 

"lie's an obstructionist who makes 
a point of order on anything that 
looks like progress." Detroit Free 
Press. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having slmjily ;i 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as -a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well Informed man, and in a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




"You -ay lie's an old-fashioned 
citizen"" 

"Yes" 

"In what respect?" 

"He still thinks the Constitution 
of the United States is sacred."— 
Birmingham Age-Herald. 



"The doctor has prescrihed physi- 
cal exercise for Reggie." "My word, 
old top! Has he joined a gym?" 
"No; he discharged his valet, and is 
learning to dress himself."— Man- 
chester Guardian. 



TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 
500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 
Uezzanith's, Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus, 
Dividers, Nautical Bcoks, Charts and Tide Tables. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



Mrs. Hcnpeck — If you marry Dick 
you need never expect me to come 
to see you. 

Daughter — Just say that into the 
gramophone, won't you, please: 

Mrs. Hcnpeck— What for? 

Daughter — I want to give the rec- 
ord to Dick as a wedding present. — 
Tit-Bits. 



Auntie (to small John, who is 
wistfully munching bread and butter 
on the back steps) — Too bad your 
little dog died, John. 1 suppose you 
miss him. 

John — 'Deed 1 do. Now 1 never 
know (piite what to do with my 
last bite. — Life. 



Kloseman — T.et me .yive you a 
piece of advice. 

Knox — What's the matter with it? 
—Life. 



Schoolmaster— Jones, spell 'weather.' 

Jones— W-e-t-t-h-e-r. 

Schoolmaster— Well, Jones, that's 
certainly the worst spell of weather 
we've had for some time. — Tit-Bits. 



I CAN SAVE YOU 

$15 

ON YOUR SUIT 



My place Is located on a 
side street, hence my 
expenses are practically 
nothing compared to big 
houses on main thorough- 
fares. 



TOM WILLIAMS 

THE UNION TAILOR 

28 SACRAMENTO ST. 



You get the same class 
of Service, Woolen trim- 
mings and excellent 
Workmanship. The Style, 
Quality and Fit I guar- 
antee. 

Is the amount not worth saving? 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 

1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 
We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Diamonds 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 





James J? Sorensen 



The One Price Jewelry Store. Everything Marked In 
Plain Figures 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

Attractive Platinum or Gold Mountings with 
Exquisite Diamonds 

WEDDING RINGS 

Hand Carved in Platinum, White Gold, Green 

Gold and the Old Style Plain Gold in 12 

DIFFERENT STYLES and all sizes 

WEDDING GIFTS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

715 MARKET ST., Above Third SAN FRANCISCO 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

Store Open: 8:30 A. M. to 6:00 P. M., Saturday Included 




Market at Fiith 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags. Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Franclscc 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

l sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you w nit your Panama blocked 
right I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

133 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 1660 



CJBfTBUSFrJj 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



s ; 





Ca^ 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization 



VOL. XXXIV, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1920. 



Whole No. 1718. 



THE FORTY-EIGHT HOURj, WEEK 



Text of Defeated "Draft Convention" Limiting Working Hours 



The report of the American Delegates to 
the convention of the International Sea- 
farers' Federation, published in last week's 
Journal, referred to the determination of 
the organized seamen in Europe to estab- 
lish the eight-hour day and the forty-eight 
hour week. 

It will be recalled that the International 
Conference, which met at Genoa under the 
auspices of the League of Nations, failed 
by a very small margin to adopt the 
"draft convention" which would have 
established the shorter workda} by treaty, 
or international agreement. The defeated 
treaty is published herewith. 

ft is highly significant that just a frac- 
tion less than the required two-thirds <>i 
the delegates present at the Genoa con- 
ference voted for the "draft convention." 



The General Conference of the International 
Labor Organization of the League of Nations, 

I raving been convened at Genoa by the 
Governing Body of the International Labor 
( Iffice on the 15th day of June, 1920, and 

Having decided upon the adoption of certain 
proposals with regard to the "Application to 
seamen of the Convention drafted at Wash- 
ington, last November, limiting the hours of 
work in all industrial undertakings, including 
transport by sea and, under conditions to be 
determined, transport by inland waterways, to 
X hours in the day and 48 in the week, con- 
sequential effects as regards manning and the 
regulations relating to accommodation and 
health on board ship," which is the first item 
in the agenda for the Genoa meeting of the 
Conference, and 

Having determined that these proposals shall 
take this form of a draft International Con- 
vention, adopts the following Draft Convention 
fur ratification by the Members of the Interna- 
tional Labor Organization, in accordance with 
the Labor Part of the Treaty of Versailles of 
28th June, 1919; of the Treaty of St. Germain of 
10th September, 1919; of the Treaty of Ncuilly 
of 27th November, 1919; and of the Treaty of the 
in and Trianon of 4th June, 1920. 

In view of the declaration in the 'l.'reatv of 
Versailles of 28th June, 1919, that all industrial 
communities should endeavor to adopt, as far 
as their special circumstances will permit, an 
eight-hours' day or a forty-eight hours' week 
as the standard to be aimed at, wdiere it has not 
already been attained, which declaration is here- 
l\ recognized as applying to seamen, the In- 
ternational Labor Conference adopts the follow- 
ing Draft Convention: — 

ARTICLE 1. 

For the purpose of this Convention. 

(a) 'I'lie term "working hours" shall include 



only effective working hours, that is to say, the 
time during which a person on board a vessel 
is engaged, under the orders of the master, out- 
side of the quarters which serve as his accommo- 
dation on board the vessel; 

(b) The term "vessel" includes all ships and 
boats, of any nature whatsoever, engaged in 
maritime navigation, whether publicly or pri- 
vately owned, and whether employed in com- 
merce or for purposes of technical instruction 
or otherwise; it excludes ships of war; 

(c) Each Member of the International Labor 
Organization will determine for itself what is 
maritime navigation as distinguished from inland 
navigation, and will communicate its deter- 
mination to the International Labor Office. 

ARTICLE 2. 

The working hours of all persons without dis- 
tinction of nationality or race, employed on 
board anv vessel, excluding masters and super- 
vising officers who do not keep a watch, shall 
be limited either to eight hours in the day or to 
forty-eight hours in the week, or to a maximum 
not exceeding eight hours in the day or forty- 
eight hours in the week for periods of time 
other than a week, subject to the provisions 
and exceptions contained in the following 
Article. 

ARTICLE 3. 

On mechanically propelled vessels of 2,000 
tons gross and over, the working hours at sea 
shall not exceed forty-eight hours per week 
for all ratings. Work on Sunday shall be con- 
tinued by the crew, who will receive compen- 
satory rest or remuneration, unless extra hands 
have been shipped for the purpose of providing 
one day's rest in seven for the whole crew. 

On these vessels, when in port, the working 
hours for all ratings shall not exeeed forty-eight 
per week or a less number where already in 
force, subject to regulations which may be made 
in each country limiting the working hours on 
its own ships in port, provided that such regu- 
lations shall not allow more working hours 
than those fixed for industrial undertakings on 
shore by the Draft Convention on hours of work 
adopted by the International Lanor Conference 
at Washington in November, 1919. 

Overtime which may be ordered by the mas- 
ter on arrival and sailing days, or for other 
necessity, not including overtime ordered by 
reason of the circumstances described in para- 
graph (a) of Article 8 of this Convention, shall 
not exceed fourteen hours per week or sixty 
hours per month; and extra hours worked 
shall he paid for, or shall be compensated by- 
time off. 

On such vessels the three-watch system shall 
In- maintained in the deck and engine-room 
departments, where the nature of the work is 
such as to require a system of work by 
watches. 

ARTICLE 4. 

The manner in which the principles laid 
down in this Convention for mechanically pro- 
pelled vessels of 2.000 tons gross and over are 
to lie applied, shall be determined by regulations 
made after consultation with Organizations of 



shipowners and organizations of seamen in each 
country. 

ARTICLE 5. 

The regulations as to working hours on all 
classes of vessels other than those covered 
by Article 3 shall be made after consultation 
with organizations of shipowners and organiza- 
tions of seamen, and shall be on principles 
similar so far as circumstances will permit to 
the principles to be applied under Article 3 
to mechanically propelled vessels of 2,0(1(1 tons 
muss and over. 

ARTICLE 6. 

Regulations as to the working hours of 
Indian seamen shall be made after consultation 
with organizations of shipowners and organiza- 
tions of Indian seamen. These regulations 
shall provide for a reduction in the present 
working hours of Indian seamen. 
ARTICLE 7. 

The contract of engagement for service on 
any vessel shall in every case contain a state- 
ment of the hours to lie worked, and Mich 
statement shall form an essential part of the 
contract. 

The national law shall provide that seamen 
shall be able to sue the master or owner of the 
vessel for redress, if this part of the contract 
is not carried out. 

ARTICLE 8. 

(a) The limit of working hours provided for 
in this Convention may be exceeded in the 
following circumstances, of which the master 
shall be the sole judge: — 

(1) When the safety of the vessel, or of the 
life of any person on board, is threatened by 
fog. stranding, fire, or other emergency; or 

(2) When it is necessary for the salvage of 
another vessel, or for the purpose of saving 
life. 

(b) The limit of working hours provided for 
in llns Convention may also he exceeded when, 
as a result of sickness or physical injury or 
other such cause during the course of the 
voyage, the crew ot the ship has been reduced 

and cannot he completed immediately by the 

engagement of other seamen. 
ARTICLE 9. 

Any changes in accommodation which may 
result from addition, to crews or increased 
manning scales following the reduction in hours 
as provided for in this Convention shall not 
diminish the hygienic protection of the seamen 
employed, and no derogation shall be made 
from the standards now established by law. 

Each member which ratifies this Convention 
shall communicate to the International Labor 
Office full information concerning the accom- 
modation provided for seamen on its vessel 
ARTICLE 10. 

'fhe provisions of this Convention do not 

apply to persons employed as Wireless Opera- 
tors. 

The provisions of tins Convention do not 
apply to persons employed as cattle-men. 
ARTICLE 11. 

Each Member of (lie International Labor Or- 
ganization which ratifies this Convention 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



l.i ni nnual report to the Interna tibnal 

Labor Office on the measure which it has 

taken to give effect to the provisions of this 
Convention, and these reports will be communi- 
cated by the International Labor Office to all 
other Members of the International Labor Or- 
ganization, 

ARTICLE 12. 

Lach Member of the International Labor 
Organization which ratifies this Convention 
to apply it to its colonies, protec- 
torates, and possessions which are not fullj 
self-go^ erning: 

Except where, owing to the local con- 
ditions, its provisions are inapplicable; or 
(1)1 Subject to such modifications as may 

be necessary to adapt it provisions to local 

conditions. 

Each Member shall notify to the Interna- 
tional Labor < )fTice the action taken in respect 
of each of its colonies, protectorates, and pos- 
sessions which are not fullv self-governing. 
ARTICLE 13. 

The formal ratifications of this Convention. 
under the conditions set forth in Part XIII. of 
the Treaty of Versailles of 28th June. 1919; 
of the Treaty of St. Germain of 10th Sep- 
tember, 1919; 'of the Treaty of Neuilly of 27th 
November, 1919; and of the Treaty of the 
Grand Trianon of 4th June. 1920, shall he com- 
municated to the Secretary-General of the 
League of Nations for registration. 
ARTICLE 14. 

Vs soon as the ratifications of two Members 
of the International Labor Organization have 
been registered with the Secretariat, the Secre- 
i,u j General of the League of Nations shall so 
notify all the Members of the International 
I .abor ( Organization. 

ARTICLE IS. 

This Convention shall come into force at 
the date on which such notification is issued 
by the Secretary-General of the League of 
Nations, but it shall then lie binding only upon 
those Members which have registered their 
ratifications with the Secretariat. Thereafter 
this t '(invention will come into force for any 
other Member at the date on which its rati- 
fication is registered with the Secretariat. 
ARTICLE 16. 

Subject to the provisions of Article IS, each 
Member which ratifies this Convention agrees 
to luing its provisions into operation not later 
than one year after its ratification, and to take 
such action as may he necessary to make these 
pro\ isions effective. 

ARTICLE 17. 

A member which has ratified (his Convention 
may denounce it after the expiration of five 
years from the date on which the Convention 
first conies into force, by an act communicated 
to the Secretary-General of the League of 
Nations for registration. Such denunciation 
shall not take effect until one year after the 
date on which it is registered with the Secre- 
tariat. 

ARTICLE 18. 

At hast once ill ten years the Governing 
Body of the International Labor Office shall 
present to the General Conference a report on 
the working of this Convention, and shall con- 
sider the desirability of placing on the Agenda 
of the Conference the question of its revision 
or modification. 

ARTICLE 19. 

The French and English texts of this Con- 
vention shall both be authentic. 



SUPPLEMENTARY REPORTS 



The two supplementary reports submitted 
by the American delegates to the recent con- 
vention of the International Seafarers' Fed- 
eration in Brussels, Belgium, are published 
herewith, in full : 

REPORT BY FURUSETH 



After consultation between the three of us. 
and as a result of information obtained concern- 
ing the Danish situation, a cable was sent 
from Genoa requesting that Sl.lMH) he seal to 
Andrew Furuseth in care of the American 
Consul, Copenhagen. 

On arrival of Carlson and Furuseth at Copen- 
hagen, it was ascertained that the $1,000 were 
in the American Consul's office, as requested.. 

In looking over the situation in Copenhagen, 
we found that the sailors and firemen were 
so deeply in a hole, that the money shared 
between them and the stewards would he of 
no value. They had become involved in an il- 
legal strike, together with the general labor 
movement of Denmark. They had entered into a 
strike which in its essence was political, and grew 
out of the question about Schlesvig. The King 
had dismissed his Advisors, as the strikers 
considered, illegally. The seamen struck at 
once, immediately prior to the Easter holidays. 
The workmen on shore declared the strike, 
but inasmuch as there were the holidays, no 
real strike was entered upon, except by the 
seamen, because a settlement was obtained lie- 
lore the holidays were over. The seamen con- 
tinued the strike, which now, from their point 
of view, became economic, that is for improved 



Then ,i had \ • t two 

mi, the strike was therefore, plainly 



i • >ndition • 

month 

illegal The shipowners appealed to the Courts 
and the sailors, firemen, and harbor workers 
were sentenced to pay one million kroner, as 
damages. This was manifestly impossibh 
was hanging over their heads, and any money 
which they received might be taken from them. 
Mr. Richrd Jensen, the regularly elected Presi 
dent of the firemen, had been compelled to 
resign, but had claims for a year's wages, 
due him under the Danish law. so if it 
did not go to the Court, it would 
Jensen. The President of the sailors was 
dismissed bj the meeting, and one, Bjelgrove 
Pedersen, was elected President on promise that 
he would furnish money. The stewards were 
not involved in the fine, but they had no 
money with which to pay current expenses, and 
it was first thought that the money would be 
best used by being delivered to them. It was, 
however, decided that we did not know suffi- 
ciently about the situation, to act in that way, 
and therefore turned the money over to Mr. C. 
Damm. Secretary-Treasurer, International Sea 
farers' Federation, to be used by him where it 
would do most good. lie turned 2.000 kroner 
over to the firemen, and the remainder, a little 
over 4,000. to the stewards, with the understand- 
ing that they should under certain conditions, 
share it with the sailors. Furuseth and Damm 
had an interview with Mr. A. O. Anderson, 
Vice-President. Shipping federation, and Com- 
mercial Director of the United Shipping 
panv, and from him we obtained a definite 
understanding that if the sailors and firemen 
would select men as officers who could In- 
trusted to see that an agreement entered into 
would be kept, the sailors and firemen would 
get the same agreement that had been . 
into in Norway, and the damages would be 
held in suspense, to fall away completely when 
the agreement entered into had been completed. 

We further discussed the question of 
men's legislation with Mr. Anderson, 'lb' 
posed new Scandinavian law contains a pro- 
vision, under which seamen may be brought on 
hoard the vessel by police, if no other men 
can be obtained, and the vessel thereby delayed, 
We submitted to Mr. Anderson that this pro- 
vision should go out of the proposed law. be- 
cause plainly while it was inserted to protect 
the vessel, it was in realitv a real and Berious 
danger to the vessel. A man brought on board 
against his will might easily and without risk 
of discovery, so damage the engines that the 
vessel would become helpless at sea. and have 
to be towed in. Mr. Anderson seemed to under- 
stand, and said that this aspect will be care- 
fully considered. 

We could not sec- any of the members of the 
Scandinavian Commission, because they were 
absent from Copenhagen. We then proceeded 

to Goteborg and consulted there with the of- 
ficers of tin- sailors, firemen, and stewards. 
They would he at Brussels. The situation in 
Sweden seemed to be all right, and it was likely 
to so remain unless improvements beyond the 
Norwegian and Danish were insisted upon, 
from there we went to Stockholm. We inter- 
viewed the officers there, and same to the same 
conclusion. Together with Roth and I 
Furuseth saw one of the most influential of the 
Swedish shipowners, and there placed before 
him the same reasons for striking out tin- para- 
graph in the proposed law. described above, as 
was given to the Danish shipowner. He seemed 

to appreciate the importance of this possible 

sabotage, and said that they would give serious 
consideration to the same. Here Carlson and 
Furuseth parted. Furuseth proceeding to Nor- 
ivhere he found the situation, so far as 
the Unions were concerned, favorable, with 
prospects that they would last as an agreement 
had already been entered into. This agreement 
was a considerable improvement on the pre- 
vious one. Furuseth found that the full mean- 
ing of the proposed law was not realized 
except by a few of the officers. Proposal for the 
law had been referred to the Unions, however, 
for their opinion, and they had selected their 
Committee to go through the wdiole proposal, 
and to submit to the Governments their conclu- 
sions thereon. In Christiania. Furuseth saw two 
of the most influential shipowners, and went 
over the same ground with them that had been 
covered ill Denmark and Sweden, with the same 
iisiilt. that the question of keeping in. or strik- 
ing out of the law. the right to take men on 
board against their will, was to be seriously 
considered. 

Attorney Bredal, the Chairman of the Nor- 
wegian Commission, was seen and expri 
the opinion that when the shipowners realize 
the possible danger of what might happen to 
the vessel through compelling a man to remain 
on the vessel against his will, or to take him 
aboard against his will, they would consent to 
the striking out of the section in question. 

The time of leaving for Brussels having ar- 
rived, furuseth left Norway, together with 
Birkeland, going through Sweden, Denmark, and 
Germany, in order to arrive at lirussels in time 
to attend the meeting of the Secretariat. 

Under the rules of the International Sea- 
farers' Federation, tin- expenses of the members 
of the Secretariat to and From the meetings, are 

to he paid by the Federation, and therefore the 
expenses of Furuseth from New Vork to Brus- 
sels and return to New York, will be paid by 



Hon, a nd this bill agreed upon by the 
tary, is submitted to our Se< i 

I leasnrer to be subtracted from the first lew 

upon the International Seamen's Union of 

America to pay the expenses of tin- federation. 

Respectfully. 

ANDREW FURUSETH. 
Referring to Denmark and Sweden I find this 
Ci 'neet. 

OSCAR CARLSON. 



REPORT BY SCHARRENBERG 



As per agreement with Delegates furuseth and 
Carlson, I proceeded from Genoa direct to 
Hamburg. 

For some time past there have been two 
seamen's unions in that country. There is the 
old organization, which is a part of German 
Transport W- i nion, with Paul Muller 

as the leading personality. Then there is a new- 
independent seamen's union organized at the 
end of the war. 

Naturally, the officials of these two unions 
arc- very bitter toward each other. Both Organi- 
zations publish a weekly paper and the editors 
are not at all backward in using strong lang 
This, of course, does not help the seamen of 
Germany — even though it furnishes considerable 
entertainment for employers. 

fhe union wages of German seamen (sailors 
and firemen t were raised to 560 marks about 
the middle of the year. Prior to that time 
monthly wages were only 460 marks. At the 
pre-war rate of exchange 5r>0 marks would be 
■imately $135.00 per month — a verj 
indeed. But the exchange rate of a Ger 
man mark has dropped from 24 cents to less 
than 2 cents. U. S. coin. 

This makes the actual union wage of German 
seamen less than S12.no per month. Even at 
that rate there are any number of men available 
at short notice. In fact, unemployment, together 
with hunger, misery and want, is 1 and 

w ides], read in Germany that any job which pro 
\ides three meals a day is considered desirable. 

I had no difficulty in arranging a conference 
with the officers of the "independent" union. 
Harry Cremer. Hamburg agent of the British 
Sailors' and Firemen's Union, very kindly as- 
sisted in arranging for this conference and per- 
sonally participated in it. We discussed in 
detail the difference in the rate of wages paid 
to German seamen with the schedule prevailing 
in other European countries and in America. 
The executive officers of this unio: 
whom had been in attendance at the ( )peil 
Seafarers' Conference in Genoa) readily agreed 
to respect and to do all in their power to 
tain the schedule of wages paid on foreign 
\css.-ls touching at German ports. In other 

words, they promised that the members of the 

independent union would sign on foreign vessels 
only for the prevailing wages, i. e.. the standard 
pay received in other ships under the same flag. 
-ed a keen desire to become 
affiliated with the- International Seafarers' Feder- 
ation and to have the maritime laws ,,f Germany 
d so as to bring them in harmony with tin- 
American Seamen's Act of 1915. 

The pre-war laws and regulations affecting 
German seamen are still in full force and i 
although the constitution of the land has been 
entirely re-drawn and liberalized. However, a 
commission is now at work to revise the laws 
and regulations governing seamen. When this 
commission has completed its task it will report 
to the Reichstag ( Parliament t and the process 
of changing existing law will then be formally 
completed, < )f course, 1 had this in mind in 
conferring with the representatives of German 
seamen. 

It was not altogether a simple matter to 
arrange a conference with the executive oil 
of the old Seamen's Union, It should be under- 
stood that the old union is by far the strongest 
numerically. Besides, it is the only union of 
seamen recognized by the German labor move- 
ment which, with over eight million members, is 
all-powerful in industrial affairs. In those circles 
the independent union of seamen is always 
referred to as a dual organization, without 
standing or influence. 

In ur:'c-r to arrange for an official interview 
with the authorized spokesmen for this organiza- 
tion 1 finally found it necessary to go to Berlin, 
where the headquarters of the Transport Work- 
ers' Union arc- located. Here 1 got in touch 
with Carl Legien, president of tin- German Fed- 
eration of Labor, who prior to the war visited 
America as the representative of the German 
inions. Mr. Legien brought about a meet- 
ing with Herman Jochade. formerly secretary 
of the International Transport Worki 
eration. Through the kindness of these two 
men I was then enabled to arrange a formal 
conference, at which where present Messrs. 
Schuman and Doring, president and vie- presi 
dent of the German Transport Workers, also 

- Muller and t.orenz of the seamen. 
The wage differential wa^ discussed and I was 
again assured that German union seamen sign- 
Foreign vessels in German ports would 
always insist upon the wages paid on other ships 
of the same- nationality. President Schiiniau, in 

(Continued on Page 11) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAU 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Freight Cars Idle; Shortage Not Real 

The Illinois Agricultural Association has 
completed a survey of the alleged freight- 
car shortage and Secretary Thompson of 
the association says: 

"This survey shows pretty clearly to the 
farmers of Illinois the excuse of 'car 
shortage' is largely camouflage, given to 
cover up some real, deeper reason for the 
present transportation inefficiency. And 
to search for that reason will be the next 
job of the farmers' business organization." 

Members of the association made daily 
records of the car initials and numbers of 
all cars at 494 stations located in 46 differ- 
ent counties for seven consecutive days. Of 
these 494 stations, 146, or 29.5 per cent.. 
reported some of the same cars on tracks 
the last day of the count as were on the 
tracks the first day of the count. 

"At all stations," says Secretary Thomp- 
son, "9,294 cars were listed the first day, 
and of these cars 938 out of 9,294 cars had 
not been moved from the country point for 
seven consecutive days. This is just a 
little over 10 per cent, of the cars at such 
points. 

"It is very moderate when we say that 
the total number of new cars which the 
railroads say they need to meet the trans- 
portation requirements of the present 
moment is not a patch to the total of 
immobile cars now idling by the weeks 
and months in terminal yards and on side 
tracks at country points. 

"Mine operators say they were forced 
to idleness many days each week, leading 
to the strike of the miners, which recently 
tied Up the mines just when the farmers 
were needing coal for thrashing. At this 
same time before the strike in Christian 
county, at Clarksdale and at Willeys, two 
trains of coal cars, totalling 53 cars, were 
reported empty at both first and last days 
of the count." 

Postal Czars Revive "Gag" Order 

The rights of postal employes continue 
to be flouted and the Roosevelt "gag" or- 
der is revived by petty czars in charge 
of the Postoffice Department. 

In Chicago the officers of the Postal 
Clerks' Union are charged with having 
printed statements in newspaper advertise- 
ments that reflected on the postal service. 
There was nothing new in the statements, 
which had previously been made before 
Congressional committees. An appeal has 
been made to the President against this 
violation of the Lloyd-La Follette law of 
1913. This act was intended to set aside 
President Roosevelt's "gag" order that no 
Government employe could petition Con- 
gress for a redress of grievances or make 
protest against these grievances without 
the consent of their department chief. 

Postmaster Selph, of St. Louis, Mo., 
has created a new mark for postal autoc- 
racy by his threat to stop the mails of 
that city if the postal clerks do not oust 
the president of their Union. Selph said 
that he would dismiss 300 clerks if they 
did not hold a new election. The clerks 
refused to act and are awaiting the post- 



master's next move. The clerk's president 
has sued Selph for $50,000 damages for 
slander. 

In a joint statement President Hyatt and 
Secretary-Treasurer Flaherty of the Na- 
tional Federation of Postal Clerks say 
that acts of Congress, intended to be bene- 
ficial to the postal employes, are being 
used by Postmaster General Burleson to 
the disadvantage of these employes. 

Under the law employes are entitled to 
10 days' sick leave each year. This has 
been construed to mean ten-twelfths of a 
day a month. This nullifies the intent of 
the law, unless an employe gets sick one 
day a month and recovers in that period, 
per the Burleson schedule. 

Another ruling by the department that 
ignores every element of justice is shown 
in the order that employes return wages 
paid for work done on Sundays. The last 
Congress changed the rule that time should 
be paid for Sunday work to time off on 
another day of the week. Now the depart- 
ment takes advantage of an interval be- 
tween the passage of the act and the time 
it became effective and has ordered all 
employes who received wages for Sunday 
work to return this money. The depart- 
ment, however, refuses time off to em- 
ployes who worked on Sundays, in spite 
of the obvious fact that they are entitled 
to either one or the other. 



Publicity Blocked by Coal Owners 

Because coal owners have failed to live 
up to to their promise to supply cost of 
production and other figures, the Federal 
Trade Commission announces the possible 
suspension of its monthly bulletin, which 
informed the public on coal industry costs 
and production. 

The commission states that attorneys 
for the National Coal Association notified 
coal owners last January that the com- 
mission has the lawful power to collect 
this information. The commission was 
given a copy of this opinion. Later the 
coal association changed its policy and it 
was agreed with the commission that the 
coal owners would start four test suits, 
covering all phases of the issue. Instead, 
the coal owners started one suit on ques- 
tions which were more favorable to them 
and the other three suits have not been 
started. In the one suit the commission 
was enjoined from enforcing penalties 
where reports were not made. The com- 
mission then invited voluntary co-oper- 
ation and the responses have become fewer 
and fewer. 

The coal owners' action is in line with 
its policy of proclaiming that the public- 
should be informed on all the facts — and 
then block every attempt to make this 
boast a reality. 

In the recent wage hearing on wage de- 
mands of bituminous miners at Scranton, 
the coal owners succeeded in stopping the 
miners from putting in the record a series 
of statistics that would show exorbitant 
profits of coal owners, their production 
costs, and their monopolistic policies. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 
355 North Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South 
Australia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office. Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Seemansvereeniging, St Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Internationale Transportarbeiter - Federation. 
Engelufer, 18, Berlin S. O. 16 Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grey 
Wedels plads, 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Longgatan 
i5, Goteborg, Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade, 15 Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 21, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Centrale Bond van Transportarbeiders, Hoofd- 
bestuur, 's Gravendykwal 111 te Rotterdam. 

Vakgroep Zeelieden, Pelikaanstraat 25, 
Rotterdam. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale clei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S. Marcellino 6-2, Italy. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle In- 
glaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altoi). 
BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedictinos 18. Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



*. — — 


-♦ 


World's 


Workers 




>> 



Iron molders in Edmonton, \1 
berta, suspended work to enforce an 
eight-hour day and a wage rate ol 

cents an hour. The old rate 
was 75 cents and :\ nine-hour day. 

The Spanish General Union of 

Workers, the Socialists and Trade 
Unionists have decided to continue 
attachment to the second Inti 

ile of Amsterdam by 110,000 
votes to 17,000. 

Striking Edmonton, Alberta, iron 
molders have broken opposition to 
their demand for wage increases by 
securing an agreement with the 

Coutts Machinery Company. \\ ages 
are advanced to °_" .'■ cents an hour. 

The refusal of the British govern- 
ment to raise miners' wages and 
cheapen the price of coal has stimu- 
lated the demand for nationalization 
of mines. The increase of railroad 
rates has had the same effect to- 
ward transportation. 

"There is a world of difference." 
says the Cotton Factory Times of 
Manchester, England, "between a 
healthy and honest discussion of the 
present-day political trickery and 
the mischievous idea that politics 
in itself is an evil and something that 
we, as trade unionists, should not 
tamper with. 

Zittan, Saxony, a city of between 
25.000 and 30,000 population where 
labor troubles recently occurred, has 
been since August 1 iii the hands of 
radical workers, according to a dis- 
watch to the Zwoelfuhrblatt. The 
message adds a committee of fifteen 
composed of independents, socialists, 
communists and syndicalists, has as- 
sumed authority over the city. 

Officers of the New Brunswick 
Federation of Labor reported to the 
annual convention that they suc- 
ceeded in amending the workmen's 
compensation act. as ordered by the 
last convention, despite opposition 
from the Manufacturers' Association. 
The amended law provides for full 
medical, hospital and skilled nurs- 
ing attendance from date of 
accident, increases the amount al- 
lowed for funeral expenses to $100. 
and increases compensation for per- 
manent partial disability. The fed- 
eration officials also reported that 
the minister of public works prom- 
ised that the words "union or pre- 
vailing wages" shall hereafter be in- 
cluded in all government contracts. 

More than 16,000 members of or- 
ganized building trades have associ- 
ated with the London building guild. 
The guild movement was started by 
Manchester building tradesmen last 
January, following the failure of 
various schemes to relieve the hous- 
ing situation. Guild membership in- 
cludes workers, administrators and 
technicians, and is managed by a 
committee composed of representa- 
tives of these various elements. Sur- 
plus earnings will not be distributed, 
as is customary in business, but 
will be used to guarantee work- 
ers' wages when unemployed, and in 
improving service and equipment. No 
financial guarantee for the* perf orm- 
of contracts will be given, but 
the guild pledges itself to carry out 
the work it undertakes, and sup- 
ports this pledge with a roll of 
volunteers who have promised to do 
this work. The guild declares that 
this is the most effective guarantee 
that can be devised. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boot? 

See them at M BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529'/- BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under hit. undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



For Twenty 

.WJRKERS UNION 



iara we have Issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 

ful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
Disputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
e and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

A.s loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLIIS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE. General Secretary-Treasurer 



UNiowraw 
FacTDry 




? 



& 



3 



% 



rysvAm 



Wilson Asks 
All to Save 

President Woodrow Wilson says that 
this country is undergoing the greatest crisis 
in its history. He urges upon all the neces- 
sity of saving. 

Are you on the tidal wave of prosperity ? 

If you are, conserve some of your re* 
sources by depositing them in bank. 

Save 1 Save ! Save I 

This applies to the business man as well 
as the day laborer. 

There is no greater way to save, than 
planning to place a certain amount in the 
bank regularly. 



q 



c 



ANGLO-C\LIFORNlAroMPANi BANK 

COMMERCIAL- SAVINGS -TRUST 

"Jno S^ersonal Service 3an^C 

MARKET6 SANSOME STREETS 
San Francisco 

POTRERO BRANCH MISSION BRANCH FILLMORE BRANCH 
Third and Twentieth Sixteenth and Mission Fillmore and Geary 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Will II Peterson and G. Johnson, 
formerly winchmen of S. S. "Carmel" 
to communicate with J. T. Smith, 
Room 411, 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 9-8-20. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of the brother of August W. Stras- 
din, will please communicate with 
1!. I. LaSelle, 924 Crocker Bldg., 
San Francisco. 9-15-20 



INFORMATION WANTED 



M embers of crews of Barge 
"Ohio" and S. S. "Gulfcoast" will 
kindly communicate with this office 
regarding their salvage claims 
against the Standard Oil Barge No. 
1 between Mobile and Port Arthur 
about May 18th. I represent a 
member of the crew and have 
already taken up the matter of a 
salvage award for him. Silas B. 
AxteM, New York, N. Y. 7-14-20 



Navigation School 

License Guaranteed or Fee Refunded. 
Mates' Courses. $55.00 

went: for < ik< i i.a i: 
Sextants, 117.50; 

. $72.50; Marin, ■ Nlghl I I 
from $27.50 Beat Makes, 

CAPTAIN PENNRICH 

36 Garden Place, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Neai Borough li.iii Sub Station 



S. G. SWANSOW 

Established l'JOl 
For the BE8T there Is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Price* 
NOTE — S. G. Kwanson is not connected 
with any dye winks and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th 8t. 
San Pedro. Los Angeles Waterfront. Cei 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

- Try - 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAM8EN, Prop 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN. Prop. 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring; times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship it Is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
(airly. Senator La toilette is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them whore they belong — on ezcest 
profits, war profits and surplus fortune* 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is bel; 
Ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other mpn in public Hfe 

Send In your order today 

$1.00 Per Year— Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine. Madison. Wis. 



Honolulu Letter List 



]'.-■! I 

lira. 11. -v. Ed. 

Buck, Harry 
Caldwell, John 
Campbell, Ed. 
Danlelsen, Adolph 
Dant, B. C. 
Ettersen. Ward 
llarns. Ed. 
.Tohnsen, Hilding 
en, John 



Lame. Pal 
I.eison, Will. 
Ltnd, l 

Mxtson, Rolf. 
Mulligan, I'M. 
Nh kuls. Henry 
Sandel, T. s 
Stronberg*, Pet. 
Stewart, A. J. 
Solberg, B. P. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of George Mace Monroe, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
last heard of at Charleston, S. C, 
March, 1916, will please communi- 
cate with his mother. Mrs. Alice 
Monroe. 918 Spruce street, Seattle. 
Washington. 6-9-20 



TO MY CLIENTS 

Please look over our legal 
reports on file in every 
Union Hall on the coasts 
ulunever you are in port. 
Notice of commencement of 
all actions, their appearance 
on the calendar for trial, 
trials, judgments and settle- 
ments effected are published 
in all cases whether for 
wages, salvage or personal 
injury. Law Office, Silas B 
Axtell, 9 State Street. New 
York. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine 



A lire which raged for more than an hour 
in one of the forward compartments of the 
superdreadnaught "California," under construc- 
tion at the Marc Island Navy Yard, caused 
damage estimated at $10,000 and for a time 
threatened to spread to other sections of the 
Riant vessel. 

British ships, and ships bound for British 
ports that call at San Francisco, will be 
picketed by Irish sympathizers in an effort to 
tie up English shipping until Great Britain 
changes her Irish policy and removes her 
army of occupation from Ireland, according to 
announcement from San Francisco headquarters 
of the Women's Irish Educational League. 

The California Macaroni Company, 956 Bryant 
street, San Francisco, one of the leading enter- 
prises of its kind in the West, has begun oper- 
ating under a receivership appointed by Judge 
of the Superior Court Bernard J. Flood. Be- 
hind the story of the receivership lies, accord- 
ing to Robert M. Light, one of the attorneys, 
a story of an attempt to wreck the company. 
En route for Melbourne, the schooner 
"Oregon Pine" has put in at Sydney. The 
vessel went into port with a jury rig. The 
steeering gear of the craft was lost on August 
20, according to a telegram received by Grant, 
Smith & Co. from Captain Daniel P. Wall. The 
vessel left the Pacific July 4 and reached Sydney 
after a sixty-six-day trip. The time required for 
the passage is considered good, even without a 
handicap. 

Lieuenant-Commander (harks S. Root of 
the Coast Guard cutter "Earp," now at San 
Diego, received a commendatory letter from 
Commodore Commandant William Reynolds for 
the excellent engineering performance of the 
Eagle type boat on its recent voyage from 
Norfolk to San Diego. The "Earp" steamed 
1800 miles, from Norfolk to Balboa, without a 
stop on less than 100 tuns of fuel. The "Earp" 
is to sail for Honolulu October 1. 

The steamship "Jugpslaven Prvi," which 
passed through the Panama Canal recently 
bound from Newport News to Africa with a 
cargo of 402S tons of coal, is the first vessel 
flying the flag of Jugoslavia to pass through the 
Can-al. She is reported by her agents as due 
at Balboa on her return voyage. She is a 
ship of 3125 gross and 2034 net registered tons, 
326 feet long by 40 feet beam, and carries a 
crew of 27. 

Admiral Hugh Rodman, commander-in-chief 
of the Pacific fleet, in a speech before the Com- 
mercial Club of Honolulu, declared that plans 
were being developed in Washington to make a 
navel base of Kanoeha Bay, on (he windward 
side of Oahu. He said the trio. Honolulu 
harbor, Pearl harbor and Kanoeha harbor, would 
accommodate any size fleet that would ever be 
stationed at Hawaii. Pearl Harbor, it was 
expected, he said, would be made the perma- 
nent base of a flotilla of destroyers. 

The total value of the export and import 
business of the San Francisco customs district 
during last July was $47,958,480, according to 
figures compiled by the Chamber of Commerce. 
The import business amounted to $27,737,749, 
and the exports were valued at $20,180,731. The 
Seattle customs district, according to the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, handled a total of $25,422,145 
in exports and imports. Of this amount $16,- 
078,990 represents exports, and the remainder, 
$9,343,153, imports. 

Bringing sealskins valued at $2,000,000, the 
season's catch on the Pribyloff Islands, the 
naval radio steamer "Saturn" hjs arrived on 
Puget Sound. The seals were killed by repre- 
sentatives of the United States Bureau of 
Fisheries, and the proceeds of the sale will go 
into the United States Treasury. Since the 
lease of the Pribyloff Islands to the Alaska 
Commercial Company was canceled, the Bureau 
of Fisheries has taken over the islands to protect 
the seals from extinction. Since that time the 
herds have increased and are bringing in a big 
revenue to the Government. 

The defense won the first legal clash in the 
case of the Grays Harbor Motorship Corpora- 
tion, charged by the Government with fraud 
in evidence of reports by Captain Robinson 
tracts, when Judge Jeremiah Neterer of the 
Federal District Court ruled against admission 
in evidence of reports by Captain Rbinson 
Ridley, hull inspector for the Shipping Board, 
to show that work on hull 1060 at the Grays 
, Harbor Motorship plant was not delayed, as 
the defense claims, by failure of the Emergency 
Fleet Corporation to deliver struts and shaft- 
ings. 

The performance of the Rolph tugs "Storm 
King" and "Hercules" in successfully towing 
nine drydock pontoons from Seattle to San 
Francisco without a single mishap resulted in 
a letter of commendation beinsi sent l>v Captain 
\ F. Pillsbury to Captain Clem Randall, port 
captain of the Rolph concern. The dry docks 
were part of those purchased by local ship 
yards from the Skinner & Eddj Company. Dui 
ing the work of transporting the tows stormy 
and foggv weather were in evidence all along 



the Washington, Oregon and California coasts, 
but the work was completed by the two tugs 
without a single mishap or delay. 

While unearthing 104 bottles of Scotch whisky 
in an ammonia tank of the liner "Sonoma," 
which arrived at San Francisco from Honolulu 
during the week, Customs Inspector George 
Williams was overcome by the fumes and had 
to be removed to his home. Other searchers 
found another 100 bottles concealed in various 
parts of the boat, much of it being under the 
false bottom of a closet in the linen locker. 
Nineteen bottles of liquor were found on the 
steamer "Archer," from Hongkong, and twenty- 
three egret feathers in the assistant engineer's 
room of the steamer "Joan of Arc," from 
Guayaquil. 

The Panama Canal completed six years of 
operation at the close of business on August 
14, 1920, having been opened to commerce on 
August 15, 1914. During the six years the total 
number of commercial ships making the transit 
was 10,573. Their aggregate net tonnage, ac- 
cording to the rules of measurement of the 
Panama Canal, was 34,540,266. The cargo they 
carried totaled 40,313,629 tons of 2240 pounds. 
This traffic was made up of 4934 ships, of 
16,145,434 net tons, carrying 16,576,778 tons of 
cargo from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and 
5639 ships, of 18,394,832 net tons, with 23,736,- 
851 tons of cargo from Pacific to Atlantic. 

Robert Dollar is back at his desk in San 
Francisco after an absence of several months, 
during which time he inspected the London 
offices of his company and other shipping 
centers of Europe. Dollar stated that the 
United States Shipping Board will have to re- 
duce the prices of the 12,000 ships that they 
have placed on the market for sale if they 
wish to dispose of them. He stated that the 
slump of freight rates and the large number 
of cargo ships lying idle in ports of the world 
will force lower prices than asked by the 
Shipping Board for their vessels. England, 
said Dollar, is our chief competitor in the 
shipping world, and the freight rates will 
topple to a much lower level than they are at 
present as competition for the commerce of the 
world increases. 

The important harbor improvements entail- 
ing expenditures running into millions of dol- 
lars will be carried out by the Dominion Gov- 
ernment in Vancouver, according to announce- 
ment of Hon. C. C. Ballantyne, Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries, who spent last week in 
Vancouver. Already the Government has ap- 
propriated $5,000,000 and has under construction 
a great pier to cost between three and four 
millions. The Northern Construction Company 
has now been awarded the contract for the 
superstructure at about $3,500,000. A chief 
feature of Mr. Ballantyne's announcement in- 
cluded his declaration that the Government is 
now endeavoring to buy in England suitable 
passenger liners for the Pacific and expects 
to have them operating within a year. He 
also said that all of the eighteen freight ships 
already launched or under construction for the 
Canadian Government merchant marine on this 
Coast will be used to develop trade from ports 
on the Pacific. Passenger accommodations for 
commercial travelers will be provided on these 
freighters. Within the last year the Canadian 
Government was forced to take over two trans- 
continental lines of railway, the Canadian 
Northern and Grand Trunk. 

Two thousand barrels of fuel oil were seized 
during the week by the United States Nayy from 
the Martinez, Cal., plant of the Shell Oil Com- 
pany. Other than the force necessary to break- 
six chains, no violence accompanied the seizure, 
and employes of the oil company offered no 
resistance to the sailors who did the work nec- 
essary to place the oil aboard the Navy barge 
that early arrived at the oil company's plant 
from Mare Island. The oil seized was desired 
to enable several destroyers to proceed to San 
Diego. It was announced by Captain Charles 
Conrad, U. S. N., supply officer at Mare Island. 
that more oil will be seized this week if the 
company persists in its refusal to voluntarily 
supply the Navy at the $2 price fixed by the 
Navy Department. The seizure of the oil came 
as the culmination of a long controversy between 
the Navy Department and the Shell Company 
concerning the price to be paid for 112,000 bar- 
rels of oil, which the department has fixed as 
the quantity the Shell people shall supply the 
Navy. It had been hoped by Navy officials that 
the company would accede to the demand for 
oil at $2 a barrel, but late last Friday the com- 
pany officials sent word that the oil would not 
be furnished at this price. It was then that the 
I Navy officials announced that the seizure would 
I be made unless the oil was supplied on demand 
to be made at the Marline/ plant. 



S. T. Hogevoll, Vdmiralty Lawyer. Seamen's 
cases a specialty. Sixth floor, Pai ifii Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1830. — Adv. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

67-69 Front Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass MILLER JENSEN. Agent 

1% Lewis Street 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN. Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JAMES C. BURNS, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WM. MILLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I ALFRED TAMKE, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga L. A. PARKS, Agent 

27 Houston Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS. Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla C. THEO. IVERSON, Agent 

12% Liberty Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C H. COOK, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. V. ROREN, Agent 

433 Court Street 

BALTIMORE, Md J. A. MORRIS, Agent 

1641 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa DAVID COOK, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

MOBILE, Ala J. W. ENGLAND, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK. Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex R. M. WILSON, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga 21 West Bay Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C W. ROSSI, Agent 

49 Market Street 
Sub Aqencies: 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEAN W. MENDELL, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

JACKSONVILLE. Fla CHAS. OGRAIN, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PORTLAND, Me 5 Exchange Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 669 Eddy Street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md LAWRENCE GILL, Agent 

804 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex HARRY BROWN, Agent 

321% Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP. Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS. La DAN LYONS, Agenl 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala JAMES GRACE, Agent 

11% St. Francis Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I C. BLAKNEY, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me A. ANDRADE, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga GEO. MeMURDO, Agent 

523 East Bay Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla J. T. HADAWAT, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C J. T. ROBINSON, Agent 

49 Market Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

Headquarters: 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary. 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA. Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass F. L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

NEW BEDFORD, Mass C. E. DOUCETT, Agent 

91 North Second Street 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

H. ESKIN, Secretary 

HOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
D. J. GEDDES. President 

KfiW HAVEN, Conn 1S% Collis Street 

(Continued on Par* ID 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL) 



The 


Seamen's 


Journal 


Published weekly at Si 


in Fra 


nclaco 




BY THE 






SAILORS' 


UNION OF 


THE 


PACIFIC 




Established in 


1887 





PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

8. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $3.00 | Six months - - - J1.50 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office. Maritime Hall Bldg.. 

BS Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for In Section 1103. Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL,, provided they are of 
general Interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1920. 



PROTESTS AGAINST JONES ACT 



Practically every maritime nation of any 
importance) at one time or another, sub- 
mitted a protest against the La Follette 
Seamen's Act. 

It is most fortunate for America that 
these purely selfish and ill-advised pro- 
tests were not heeded. In a very few 
years the world has become reconciled to 
the principles contained in the La Follette 
law. In fact, if the seamen of the world 
ha\e the courage of their convictions, sev- 
eral of the maritime nations of Europe 
will soon enact similar legislation. All 
of which proves up on an old adage re- 
vised to meet the occasion, i. e., that the 
test of time is more reliable than the pes- 
simistic predictions of reactionary ship- 
owner-. 

Today America is again in receipt of 
protests from the same sources. This time 
it is the so-called Jones Merchant Marine 
Act that seems to contain sufficient worth- 
while. matter to inspire those lusty "kicks" 
from abroad. 

It is, of course, wholly unnecessary to 
state that the efforts in this direction are 
truly significant. They indicate with 
powerful emphasis that the Jones Act will 
be an effective measure in maintaining an 
adequate American merchant marine. Cer- 
tainly, if the statements of foreign ship- 
ping interests are taken at their face value, 
the new law will be all that its advo- 
cates claim for it. In other words, here 
we apparently have another statute by 
virtue of which the United States will 
step a little nearer to the place among 
nations to which it is entitled. 

To fully understand this protest against 
certain features in the Jones Act it is 
necessary to look backward into an earlier 
statute, namely the Underwood tariff bill. 
This measure contained certain discrimi- 
nating duty provisions favoring American 
ships. But while Congress was giving 
in uth oratory to these proposals, the For- 
eign shipping interests merely abided their 
time knowing that under a number of 



innocent appearing commercial treaties to 
which the United States was a party, these 
sections of the bill would be about as 
effective in encouraging American ship- 
ping as a resolution passed by a young 
ladies' debating society. The Jones Act, 
however, seeks to amend or repeal these 
commercial treaties so that the five per 
cent, discriminating duty in favor of 
American ships will become effective. To 
this our neighbors object. Moreover, 
there are intimations of retaliatory meas- 
ures. 

( )ur friends and neighbors also submit 
the claim that American railways must 
make the same rates to the ships of all 
nations. If the various foreign govern- 
ments press thi> claim, section 2$. which is 
the feature of the Jones Act relating to 
railroad rates, will be in the spotlight of 
the shipping world as much as section 10 
of the peace treaty has been in the dis- 
cussion of the League of Nations. Ad- 
vocates of merchant marine legislation 
frankly regard it as the heart of the Jones 
Act. In fact, Admiral Benson states if 
the government departments have not suffi- 
cient authority to enforce it against for- 
eign shipping interests, the Shipping Board 
will go to Congress for additional legis- 
lation. 

Because of the prominence that section 
28 inav acquire in the discussion, the 
vital paragraph of it is published here- 
with : 

That no common carrier shall charge, collect, 
or receive, for transportation subject to the In- 
terstate Commerce Act of persons or property, 
under any joint rate, fare, or charge, or under 
any export, import, or other proportional rate, 
fare, or charge, which is based in whole or in 
part on the fact that the persons or property 
affected thereby is to be transported to, or has 
been transported from any port in a possession 
or dependency of the United States, or in a 
foreign country, by a carrier by water in for- 
eign commerce, any lower rate, fare or charge 
than that charged, collected, or received by it 
for the transportation of persons, or of a like 
kind of property, for the same distance, in the 
same direction, and over the same route, in con- 
nection with commerce wholly within the 
United States, unless the vessel so transporting 
such persons or property, is. or unless it was 
at the time of such transportation by water, 
documented under the laws of the United States. 

Stripped of its legal verbiage this para- 
graph means that only such freight and 
passengers as come to American ports on 
American ships shall be privileged to re- 
duced rates on American railroads. 

Naturally this will give an advantage to 
American ships. And therefore the pro- 
tests from abroad. Well, here's prophesy- 
ing that the latest foreign objections to 
an American shipping policy will be more 
futile than the onetime raps against the 
La Follette Act. 

Incidentally, it should be said that the 
Jones Act contains a few well-worded para- 
graphs patching up the holes that have been 
shot in the La Follette Seamen's Act by 
various court decisions. 

So as a whole, it is a mighty fine piece 
of constructive legislation! 

The "declaration of an American ship- 
ping policy" fas written into Section 1 
of the Jones Act) needs no apology from 
any American. It is plain, logical and to 
the point. To quote: 

"That it is necessary for the national 
defense and for the proper growth of its 
foreign and domestic commerce that the 
United States shall have a merchant 
marine of the best equipped and most 
suitable types of vessels sufficient to 
carry the greater portion of its commerce 



and serve as a naval or military auxiliary 
in time of war or national emergency, 
ultimately to be owned and operated 
privately by citizens of the United States; 
and it is hereby declared to be the policy 
of the United States to do whatever may 
be necessary to develop and encourage 
the maintenance of such a merchant 
marine." 

"To do whatever may be necessary" is 
indeed an emphatic and meaningful 
declaration. But why should not America 
do whatever is necessary to maintain a 
real merchant marine? Have not certain 
other maritime nations done so almost 
continuously ever since they had enough 
stamina to give expression to a national 
policy ? 



SEEING THINGS IX EUROPE 



Right at close of an optimistic review of 
Italy, Mr. Otto II. Kahn, an American finan- 
cier, who has recently returned from Eu- 
rope, gives his impressions of the European 
labor situation as follows: 

The labor situation in the European countries 
I visited is not very different from our own. 
It presents one of the most urgent and com- 
plex problems of the day. but neither there nor 
here do I look upon the attitude of labor as 
being actuated to any serious extent by Bol- 
shevist or kindred motives. 

Public opinion in those countries, as here, has 
shown itself decisively opposed of late to un- 
warranted strikes and pernicious agitation. Jus- 
tice, reason, enlightenment through education, 
the inexorable force of the actualities of life 
and the pressure of public opinion on both cap- 
ital and labor, may, I hope, be relied upon to 
bring about surcease from the ever-recurrent 
industrial conflicts which have characterized the 
past eighteen months to the great detriment" of 
all the people. 

In the light of current press dispatches 
from Italy one is inclined to marvel at Mr 
Kahn's sources of information. Tt is de- 
cidedly unfortunate for the thinking Aincr 
ican public that so many travelers in Europe 
secure most of their information and many 
of their impressions in and about the lobby 
of first-class hotels. 

The man who talks about the "pressure 
of public opinion on both capital and labor" 
would be up against it if he had to define 
that mysterious force vaguely referred to as 
"the public." 

Tf the public of Europe is that compara- 
tively small element in society which neither 
toils nor spins, then it cannot exert enough 
pressure to hurt a fly, much less prevent 
strikes. Justice is indeed the only effective 
remedy for so-called unwarranted strikes 
and pernicious agitation. But what is the 
meaning of justice' And what is pernicious 
agitation? Does it mean that the toilers of 
Furope must, without complaining, live in 
poverty and squalor now that the world has 
been made safe for democracy? Does it 
mean that workers living in semi-starvation 
who finally venture on a strike are to be 
condemned by visitors from abroad who live 
in the best hotels and have never in their 
lives experienced hunger or want? 

\"o. Such deductions are neither jusl nor 
reasonable, and it is a crying shame that 
American financiers who glibly talk about 
"ever-recurrent industrial conflicts" in Eu- 
rope cannot or will not look beneath the 
surface. Having in mind only the oppor- 
tunities for safe and profitable investment, 
they regard the working people as mere milk- 
cows placed on earth to produce and repro- 
duce for the benefit and profit of the in- 
vestor from across the Atlantic 

Truly, it is a blessing for mankind thai 
the workers of all countries in Furope have 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL) 



positively declined to play the part assigned 
to them. In Italy, in France, in Germany 
and in England the toilers are just beginning 
In realize the possibilities of organized effort. 
They will make blunders as of old. But 
they will never again calmly and tamely sub- 
mil to scientific exploitation by financiers. 



PUBLIC VS. PRIVATE PROFIT. 



According to reports just received from 
Australia the building of the new capital 
city for the Commonwealth, which had 
been interrupted by the war, has been re- 
sumed. The new city is located in the cen- 
ter of a federal district having an area of 
900 square miles. The plans include a 
number of magnificent public buildings, 
wide streets and fine parks. The architect 
is an American, whose plans were accepted 
after a competitive test participated in by 
architects throughout the world. These de- 
tails are interesting, but the most interest- 
ing as well as the most important feature 
of the work is not included among them. 
This feature is the fact that the Australian 
Commonwealth intends to avoid a serious 
mistake committed by the United States 
when the city of Washington was planned. 

The Commonwealth of Australia will not 
allow an)- of the lands within the federal 
district to become private property. Indi- 
viduals may lease whatever lands they 
wish to use, but none can be purchased. 
Lessees may build or make other improve- 
ments, and these buildings or improve- 
ments will be the property of the indi- 
viduals and be free of taxation, but the 
building sites will remain the property of 
the Commonwealth. The rental value of 
all land within the district an- ill go into the 
public treasury to pay communal expenses. 

It is so different in Washington, D. C. 
For here nine-tenths of the land is pri- 
vately owned .and all revenue from rents, 
etc., goes into private coffers. 

Australia is wise in adopting a different 
policy. And it is not too late for the United 
States to profit by the example. Congress 
need but legislate so as to abolish taxation 
of labor within the District of Columbia 
and to tax land values sufficiently to put 
the entire rental values in the treasury. 
Progressive Australia has won the credit 
for leadership in applying common sense 
to the land policy of its new federal dis- 
trict. 



WORTH WHILE SUGGESTIONS 



The returns of Lloyd's Register for June 
30, 1920, which cover vessels of 100 gross 
Ions or over show that on that date the 
world's merchant shipping comprised 31,595 
ships of 57,314,065 gross tons, compared 
with 2'K2S? ships of 50,910,273 gross tons 
on June 30, 1919, and 30,836 ships of 49,- 
089,552 gross tons on June 30, 1914. So it 
appears that notwithstanding the German's 
submarine warfare and all the other losses 
of the war there were afloat on June 30, 
1920, more ships and more tonnage than just 
prior to the war. The actual increase in 
ships over 1914 is 759; and the growth in 
tonnage over 1914 is 8,224,513. 



The strength of organized labor lies in 
its weakness. That which it lacks in 
power of compulsion it gains by appeal 
to rational human ambition and intelli- 
gent perception of right and wrong. Right 
enjoined by force becomes wrong, and 
therefore fails. 



American Publicist Sets Forth What He Deems 

Necessary to the Maintenance of a 

Merchant Marine 



A well known American publicist, who pre- 
fers to keep his name anonymous, was recently 
asked to reply to the following: 

"What do you suggest as necessary to the 
upbuilding of the permanent American Mer- 
chant Marine?" 

Here is his answer. 

I consider that the first essential to the 
upbuilding of the American Merchant Marine 
is to put it on an equal, even a better, footing 
than that enjoyed by any other merchant 
marine. 

I do not believe in subsidies or any other 
form of special privilege. I do believe in equal 
rights to all and special privileges to none. 

I believe that the so-called Seamen's Law, 
if thoroughly enforced will equalize the wages 
of all seamen coming to American ports. 

I would give even the Chinaman, the Lascars, 
or any other cheap labor on foreign ships, the 
right to leave their ships in any safe port. 

I believe that for every Chinaman who 
comes ashore, some other Chinaman or some 
sailor of some other race must take his place 
when the ship goes to sea, thus leaving the 
population of this country the same in numbers 
as it was before, so that the argument of over- 
running the country with cheap labor would 
not hold in a case like that. 

t believe that it would be impossible to 
hire men to make up that crew for less than 
the wage paid on our clean, splendid American 
ships. 

I believe that this theory has worked out 
already as predicted by Andrew Furuseth, and 
I understand that practically all American 
shipowners now acknowledge the facts. 

I further believe that all American ships 
should be relieved of taxes. I believe that ships 
are desirable, as well as necessary things. 

I believe in making it easy to get necessary 
and desirable things. 

I believe that the higher we tax these things, 
the harder we make them to get. 

I believe that if a man makes or buys a 
ship, it is his, because he bought it or made 
it. 

There are some things that no man made, but 
which men are permitted to buy and keep, 
many times out of use. 

I refer to land, which no man ever made. 
The Creator presumably made the land for all 
of his creatures. 

Under the present system we permit a few 
of the creatures to own it and to charge other 
creatures for the privilege of using it. 

This, to my mind is our greatest special pri- 
vilege. 

Some people say that there is lots of gov- 
ernment land even yet, subject to settlement, 
but, I believe that the land you can get for 
nothing is the dearest land you can buy. The 
unimproved value which attaches to land is 
clearly a community made value. 

If all of the population should move away 
from the community, the land would cease to 
have any value. 

They could move their furniture, their horses, 
sheep or cattle with comparatively small loss, 
to some other location, but they could not 
move their land. 

They might even move their houses, or per- 
haps a whole town, as they have recently done 
at Ribbing, Minn. 

If then the value which attaches to land 
is a community made value, why not take that 
value for community purposes? 

In amount it would be sufficient and far 
more than sufficient to pay all of the present ex- 
penses of any existing government. 

If so, why go on taxing ships and other 
useful things? 

We can tax shoes so high that men, women 
and children would have to go barefooted. We 
can tax food so high, that they would have 
to go hungry. But, we can tax land up to its 
full annual rental value, and we would have no 
less land. We might in reality have more, for 
land held out of use for speculative purposes, 
is leaving us just about as bad off as if it 
did not exist at all. If we want more ships 
and better ships, we should not fine the men 
for their enterprise who build ships and operate 
them. 

Men who own idle land and hold it for a 
rise are the barnacles which gather on the 
Ship of Civilization. They impede its progress 
and they retard its movements. 

If so, they are clearly an undesirable feature 
of our existence. If that is true, we should get 
rid of them as soon a possible. 

When dogs become too thick in a com- 
munity we raise the tax and thin them out. 
Perhaps if it works on the dog, it might work 
on the idle landlord, who keeps his land idle, 
while men go hungry for what that land 
would produi e 

\uw perhaps none (if this is new to \<m. It 
is the philosophy of the late Henry George, of 
whom I have been a disciple for more than 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cab, Sept. 7, 1920. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., C. F. May presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping medium; plenty of members ashore. 
Headquarters, San Francisco, Cah, Sept. 13, 1020. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m.. Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping medium, a good number of 
members ashore. Balloted for delegates to the 
California State Federation of Labor. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 
Secretary pro tem. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS 



Members at San Francisco must not ship 
themselves to join vessels at Agencies. Those 
that do will be required to conform to Shipping 
Rules of Agencies. 

This rule adopted at regular meeting, San 
Francisco, Cal., August 30, 1920. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 

Secretary, p. t. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping very dull; prospects uncertain. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Taeoma Agency, Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL. Agent. 
84 Seneca Street. P. O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects fair. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88 >/ 3 Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 7, 1920. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
]28'/ 2 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, Aug. 31, 1920. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

JOSEPH FALTUS, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 11, 1920. 
Shipping Medium. Prospects fair. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
No. 42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 2, 1920. 
Shipping fair. Good for Cooks. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room No. 203. P. O. 
Box 514. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 2, 1920. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping good. Men 
scarce. 

JOSEPH MACK. Agent. 
No. 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 54. Phone 
Sunset 547-W. 

DIED 

Richard T. Jones, No. 2528, a native of Eng- 
land, age 58. Died at Vancouver, P>. ('., Sep 
tember 2, 1920. 

Erick Frickson, Xo. 784, a native of Sweden, 
age 33. Drowned from schooner "Camalo" at 
Port Townsend, Wash., August, 1920. 

Peter Ackcrson, No. 100, a native of Denmark, 
age 69". l)ie<! on board S. S. "Northwestern." 
September 7, 1920. 

John Gronos, No. 1321. a native of Finland, 
age 30, Drowned at I.okonak, Alaska, this 
summer. 

August Kolod, Nh. 1076, a native of Germany, 
35. Drowned at Lokonak, Alaska, this 
summer, 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ON THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 

Contributed by the Atlantic and Gulf Seamen's Unions 



AN INTERESTING MEETING 



An interested and enthusiastic crowd oi 
able Seamen attended the regular meeting 
of The Eastern and Gulf Sailors Associa- 
tion, held at Headquarters, 67-69 South 
St., New York, on Monday evening, Aug. 
30th, l'*-'". to hear the report of President 
Andrew Furuseth, concerning the out- 
come and results of the International Sea- 
men's conferences at Genoa, Italy and 
Brussels, Belgium, whence he lias just re- 
turned, together with his co-delegates. 
Comrades i iscar Carlson. Secretary of the 
Marine Firemen < >ilers and Watertenders 
Union, and Paul Scharrenberg, Editor of 
The Seamen's Journal. 

Comrade Furuseth always attracts a 
large audience among seamen, but on this 
occasion, he fairly outshone himself. 

Tt was certainly a record meeting and 
the big audience hall at our new head- 
quarters was packed to capacity with an 
expectant crowd of seafaring men, all eager 
to hear at first hand the report of our 
veteran president and learn just how far 
the gospel of Seamen's Emancipation had 
progressed among the European nations. 

Comrade Charles Thorsen presided at 
the meeting, and among those present was 
Comrade Marry 1'. I biffin, president of 
the Marine Cooks' and Stewards' Associa- 
tion and Mr. E. V. Roren, business agent 
of the Scandinavian branch of the same 
organization. 

The meeting was called to order at 6 
P. M.. and continued in session until after 
1(1 o'clock. 

After the routine business has been dis- 
posed of Comrade furuseth was given the 
floor ami made an Address lasting about 
one hour. 

Hut inasmuch as his report and the 
report of the entire delegation is to appear 
in The Journal presently we will not pre- 
sume to dwell upon it here. 

Certain points were made clear, however, 
in 1 'resident Furuseth's address. 

The League of Nations, its signatory 

powers and the European shipowners all 
Favor the perpetuation of contract slavery 
in the sea-service and will concede nothing 
to thi' freedom and enfranchisement of sea- 
men except under colli] Ullsioil . 

The European seamen, on the other 

hand, while still to some extent wedded 
to ancient ideals are becoming awakened 
to the principle of American [npedendence 
and individual prerogative as embodies in 
the l.a Follette I. aw. and reasserted in 
the lone- Act. The principle, we believe, 
will ultimately prevail in Europe as well 
as in the United States, for the campaign 
of education already established there by 
the International Seamen'- Union of 
America will continue to persist and per- 
severe until the European seamen are 
emancipated, or the European powers de- 
throned. 



In addition to Comrade Furuseth's report 
several very important subjects were dis- 
cussed at the last meeting, and some of 
them Anally disposed of. 



The most important of all these was the 
decision to begin a campaign of education 
along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. 

The educational work will proceed in 
three separate and distinct forms 

The first of these will consist of a 
course of interesting and instructive dis- 
courses to be delivered and continued in- 
definitely from branch to branch, and port 
to port among all classes of seamen, both 
union and non-union throughout the At- 
lantic and Gulf Coast. 

The purpose of these discourses will be 
to instruct the rising generation of Sea- 
nun in regard to their duties and obliga- 
tions to the Merchant Marine, and its offi- 
cers, to their country as well as to their 
Union and towards each other, and in 
regard to their own rights and privileges 
as American seamen under the Constitu- 
tion and laws of the United State-. 

This is a course of instruction of which 
the great majority of present-day seamen 
stand badly in need, and one which neither 
the Government, The Shipping Hoard, the 
Shipowners, nor the Sea-Service Bureau, 
or roof garden instructors have ever 
found time to adopt. 

For the purposes of disseminating the 
doctrines of Unionism, true seamanship, 
loyal citizenship and lawful obedience 
among American seamen, it is now pro- 
posed to inaugurate a co-operative cam- 
paign of oral instruction along our coasts, 
to be conducted by our most capable and 
best qualified expounders under the joint 
and collective auspices and jurisdiction of 
the Sailors'. Firemen and Stewards' Unions 
of the Atlantic and Gulf. 

For the prosecution of this difficulty 
and exacting duty, the Sailors have unani- 
mously and inequivocally declared in favor 
of Mr. ( i. If. Brown, former business 
agent of the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' As- 
sociation at Xew York, and the Stewards 
will, in all probability cast a similar mantle 
upon the broad shoulders of Mr. H. P. 
Griffin, president of the Marine Cooks' and 
Stewards' Association of the Atlantic and 
Gulf. 

Those acquainted with the wonderful 
ami courageous records of these two gen- 
tlemen in their respective organizations 

will not wonder at the choice made hv 
their admiring comrades. 

Their long, loyal and oft times desper- 
ate experiences as organizers and leaders. 
their consummate knowledge of Maritime 
and industrial affairs, their broad-minded 
wisdom, integrity, honesty, determination 
and practical sense, as well as their well 
known oratorical powers and convincing 
logic, all stamp Comrades Griffin and 
brown as the first and famous choice 
among their fellows as expounders of 
truth. 



The second plan in our program of edu- 
cation, which was likewise introduced and 
outlined by President Furuseth. is entirely 
practical and technical in purpose and 
character. 

This is to give to our younger and le-s 
experienced members thorough and explicit 



instruction in all the arts, mysteries ami 
principles of practical seamanship as de- 
veloped and applied to nautical science, 
since the days of old Jonah, and long 
before. 

The Sailors have now acquired then- 
own property at (<7-t>'> front st.. New 
York, where their permanent headquarters 
are established. On the top floor of the 
building is a very large vacant floor, with 
large windows front and rear and a very 
lofty roof with great skylights open to the 
light and air of Heaven. This space, not 
now in use, would make an ideal sail or 
rigging loft. 

For some time past, the Sailors have 
been debating how best to utilize or pro- 
fitably dispose of it. 

It has now been decided to remodel and 
equip it as a first-class nautical school, 
or academy, if that sounds better where 
young seamen can acquire by demonstra- 
tion and practice the technical and con- 
structive knowledge, now so badly lacking, 
and so sorely needed in the safe and expert 
management of the American Merchant 
Marine. 

bong experience has shown and numer- 
ous deplorable incidents have demonstrated 
both the wisdom and necessity of such a 
course of instruction. 

Xo steamer ever made a sailor, neither 
did a training ship. Young men emerging 
from the Navy are worse than useh 
the Merchant Marine, until they have 
undergone a special course of nautical 
training in sailing ship methods. Neither 
the training ships, the recruiting camps, 
or the Sea-Service Bureau ever do, or 
ever can impart such instruction. 

The boys are not to blame. They are 
being recruited from all walks of life and 
the public schools to the Merchant Marine 
without regard to their previous inclina- 
tions or personal fitness. 

All they learn in the training ships is 
what they learn from each other — usually 
not creditable, either to themselves or their 
preceptors. 

In the Navy they learn that everything 
on earth must lie gained by fighting, and 
they enter the Merchant Marine, di 
mined to fight or bluff their way through, 
and collect their wages, rations and over 
time, whether they are able to earn it or 
not. Such a state of affairs, as now exists 
in the American Merchant Marine in 
regard to efficiency, loyalty and discipline 
is positively dangero* and detrimental to 
all concerned, and disgraceful to the 
service. 

In order to correct these abuses, there- 
fore; to elevate the service, to creat res- 
pect for real seamen, and true seamanship, 
to inspire loyalty, devotion and honor 
among those dedicated by nature to the 
service of Neptune, and to uphold the 
American flag upon the high seas and 
thooughout the world, The Eastern and 
Gulf Sailor-' Association will establish this 
school for the selective* training of \mer- 
ican youth and the Maritime honor of 
our country. 

The nauticai school will he opened as 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



soon as the necessary arrangements can 
be completed and the requisite gear, tools, 
machinery and other equipment procured. 

The school will be open to all members 
free of charge, and will be under the 
immediate supervision of competent and 
practical seamen instructors. Here will be 
a splendid opportunity for ambitious young 
men to learn the secret artifices of their 
chosen craft, and one we believe of which 
they will eagerly avail themselves. 

Boys and young men intending to qualify 
for officers certificates, should be among 
the first to enroll in our nautical school, 
for to send a man to the bridge without 
practical instruction, is like sending a 
student to college without elementary 
education. 

If the plan proves successful in New 
York, as doubtless it will, it can be easily 
extended to other large ports of the Atlantic 
and Gulf Coasts, so that all our young- 
members may be given a chance to qualify 
and excel in their chosen vocation. 

A similar project is now on foot in the 
Marine Cooks' and Stewards' Associations 
also, and we believe it will be realized in 
the not distant future. 

This organization has been desirous of 
establishing a practical cooking school for 
the benefit of its members for some time 
past, and only the present congested and 
overcrowded condition of its building at 
headquarters has prevented the plan from 
coming to fruition. 

The Stewards are now negotiating, how- 
ever, for the purchase of a suitable build- 
ing of their own, and as soon as it has 
been acquired the establishment of a com- 
plete and commodious cooking school will 
be one of the first orders of business. 

Bad cooking, bum seamanship and base 
manners have been the three worst banes 
of the American Merchant Marine for the 
last five years. 

They have constituted the principal 
causes of all the ill-feeling, quarrels and 
discontent that have developed on ship- 
hoard, between man and man, and between 
mates and men in the new Merchant 
Marine. 

It is now proposed, therefore, by the 
Seamen's Unions to eliminate these evil 
conditions and malicious tendencies by the 
intensive and practical instruction, and 
moral elevation of our own members at 
our own expense. 

The Marine Firemen, Oilers and Water- 
tenders' Union have not as yet had time 
to act upon these programs, but that they 
will do so at a very early date is beyond 
doubt. That the men in the engine room 
department need education in 'regard to 
their duties, and instruction regarding 
their rights as well as men in other 
branches of the service is obvious, and 
that the Firemen's Union need a general 
organizer in the field as well as the 
Sailors' and Stewards' Unions, is also in- 
disputable. It is more than likely, there- 
fore, that the organized firemen of the At- 
lantic and Gulf will soon elect a special 
organizer to co-operate with those chosen 
by the Sailors' and Stewards' in their 
campaign of education along the (oast. 

The third branc hof education to be 
launched by the Seamen's Unions will be 
literary and militar) and will be conducted 
through the columns of The Seamen's 



j Journal. To instruct American seamen in 
the rights, duties and obligations of sea- 
I men ; to teach all seamen under the Amer- 
I ican flag the rights, duties and obligations 
! of American citizenship and to repeal and 
! dispel and truthfully counteract the evil 
| and malicious propaganda inspired by ship- 
| pressed upon the public and political minds 
of the country by five years of relentless 
and malicious propanda inspired by ship- 
owners, both native and foreign, and dis- 
seminated by well-paid prevaricators and 
intellectual prostitutes of all stripes, 
against the Seamen's Unions and the Sea- 
men's Act. 

The only effective way to defend and 
preserve the Seamen's Act is to tell the 
truth about it, and exploit the actual con- 
ditions of sea-service obtaining in the 
Merchant Marine, both before and subse- 
quent to its enactment. 

Truth is mighty and must prevail, but 
the propagandists have always scrupu- 
lously avoided facts, or else belied them in 
discussing the LaFollctte Law for public 
perversion. 

The pig that- keeps still su.-.k:5 the most 
swill and the paper that stands pat and 
gobbles the most lies without squirming 
likewise gets the corporation advertising. 
The high-browed, but low minded pub- 
lishers are well aware of that, so they will 
gag at nothing with a golden husk on it. 

It is up to us old sailors, therefore, with 
long experience and everlasting memories 
to set the public light as to facts, and 
confound the prevaricators as to fabrica- 
tion?. 

JAMES H. WILLIAMS. 



PROGRESS AT PORT ARTHUR 



An interesting communication from Com- 
rade William Miller, agent of the Eastern 
and Gulf Sailors' Association at Port Ar- 
thur. Texas, is at hand. 

The chief topic of Comrade Miller's letter 
is the clearing of the American full-rigged 
ship "Marion Chilcot" from Beaumont, 
Texas, for Aalborg, Denmark, with a full 
union crew from first mate to cabin boy. 

"This," says Comrade Miller, "is the first 
time in the history of the port that a square- 
rigger ever got away without paying tribute 
to the crimps The money and time saved," 
he adds, "is considerable." 

That the cost of engaging a crew at Port 
Arthur through the crimps would have been 
"considerable," is an indisputable fact. Like 
all parasites the crimp is out for blood, and 
he will suck his victim white every time he 
gets hold. 

When a crew is wanted for a square-rigger 
at Port Arthur the head crimp will take a 
vacation at the expense of the ship. He 
will travel all over the Gulf, to Galveston, 
New Orleans, Mobile, and sometimes as far 
as Savannah, Ga., ostensibly looking for 
seamen, and incidentally squandering the 
ship's money on fun and riotous living. 

Then, when his vacation and rioting are 
over he comes back with a bunch of hobd 
trailing behind him, and their expenses as 
well as his own are charged up to the ship, 
and sometimes whacked up with the captain. 

Crimps all over the world regard square- 
riggers as their own peculiar graft and will 
fight to the last ditch to retain control ot 
them. 

The prohibition of advances to seamen 



staggered them for a while and most of them 
disappeared from the business, but the more 
crafty and persevering among them soon 
learned that many masters and owners of 
sailing ships would rather pay graft or ac- 
cept bribes than conduct their business hon- 
orably through the fair and square medium 
of the Seamen's Union. 

The organized seamen at Port Arthur re- 
fuse to ship through the crimps, and most 
of the narrow-visioned shipowners would 
rather deal with the devil (which they usually 
do) than allow the seamen to control their 
own labor. 

Tt is a reasonable proposition to assume 
that no honest, right-minded shipowner 
would deal with Crimp & Co. at ruinous 
and riotous expense, when he could have 
capable seamen ready to hand with no ex- 
pense at all, if there were not an ulterior 
purpose in his act. 

Whenever the master of a sailing ship 
complains that he cannot get men except 
through the crimps, it is an open-face as- 
surance that the agent of the Seamen's Union 
refuses to pay bribes or accept graft. The 
owners are usually willing to pay the tall 
water charges of Crimp & Co. and spread 
their losses over the public in order to escape 
the just demands of union seamen. 

The master and owners of the "Marion 
Chilcot" have set a good example at Port 
Arthur in this instance and one we hope will 
he followed by their competitors. 

Comrade Miller informs us that the "Mar- 
ion Chilcot" was engaged for many years in 
the oil trade between San Francisco and the 
Hawaiian Islands, and that her skipper, Cap- 
tain Anderson, is well known on the Pacific 
Coast. The ship, which was formerly owned 
by the Associated Oil Co. of California, has 
(Continued on Page 11) 

Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utili- 
ties. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and 
telephone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man 
suffrage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by tht 
banking interests for their own private *ain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



DIMENSIONS OF THE U. S. 



The gross area of the United States is 
3,026,789 square miles. The land area 
amounts to 2.073,774 square miles, and the 
water area— exclusive of the area in the 
Great Lakes, the Atlantic, the Pacific, and 
the Gulf of Mexico within the three-mile 
limit— amounts to 53,015 square miles. 
These and other data determined or com- 
piled by the United States Geological Sur- 
vey, Department of the Interior, to show 
the limits of the continental United States 
contain some interesting facts. 

The southernmost l><>int of the main- 
land is Cape Sahle. Fla., which is in lati- 
tude 25° 07' and longitude 81° 05'. The ex- 
treme southern point of Texas is in lati- 
tude 25° 50', and longitude 07° 24'. Cape 
Sahle is therefore 40 miles farther south 
than the most southern point in Texas. 

A small detached land area of northern 
Minnesota at longitude 95° 09' extends 
northward to latitude 49° 23'. 

The easternmost point of the United 
States is West Quoddy Head, near East- 
port, Maine, in longitude 66° 57' and lati- 
tude 44° 4')'; the westernmost point is 
Cape Alva, Wash., in latitude 48° 10', 
which extends into the Pacific Ocean to 
longitude 124° 45'. 

From the southernmost point in Texas 
.hie north to the forty-ninth parallel, the 
boundary between the United States and 
Canada, the distance is 1,598 miles. From 
West Quoddy 1 lead due west to the 
Pacific Ocean the distance is 2,807 miles. 
The shortest distance from the Atlantic 
to the Pacific across the United States is 
between points near Charleston, S. C, 
and San Diego, Calif., and is 2,152 miles. 

The length of the Canadian boundary 
line from the Atlantic to the Pacific is 
3.808 miles. The length of the Mexican 
boundary from the Gulf to the Pacific is 
1,744 miles. The length of the Atlantic 
coast line is 5,560 miles and that of the 
Pacific coast line is 2,730 miles. The 
Gulf of Mexico borders the United States 
for 3,640 miles. 

Nearly all maps of the United States 
show the parallels of latitude as curved 
lines and are likely to lead the ordinary 
observer to believe that certain eastern or 
western States are farther north than 
some of the central States that are actually 
in the same latitude. For this reason, 
one who is -asked which extends farther 
south, Florida or Texas, is very likely to 
say "Texas,"' but, as stated, the main- 
land of Florida is nearly 50 miles farther 
south than the southermost point in 
Texas. For the same reason, when 
wc consider the geographic positions of 
countries south of the United States we 
find that errors are likely to be made in 
estimating position or extent in longitude. 
Few realize that the island of Cuba, for 
example, if transposed directly north 
would extend from New York City to 
Indiana, or that Habana is farther west 
than Cleveland, Ohio, or that the Panama 
Canal is due south of Pittsburg, Pa., or 
that Nome, Alaska, is farther west than 
I lawaii. 



ordinary atmospheric conditions is mag- 
nesium, which is only two-thirds as heavy 
as aluminum. Magnesium is a beautiful 
silvery-white metal that has been made in 
the United States only since 1015 and is 
now made at but three plants. Tt is known 
to comparatively few people and to most 
of those few chiefly as a silvery powder 
used for making flash lights in photog- 
raphy. Tt was imported from Germany for 
this use for mane years. During the world 
war large quantities of powdered magnes- 
ium were made in the United States for 
use in star-shells designed to illuminate 
battle fields at night, as well as in special 
shells designed to show in the daytime 

exactly where the shell- containing it ex- 
ploded. The white cloud by day and the 
brilliant white pillar of fire by night — 
both striking features of the battle fields 
of the world war — were produced by the 
combustion of magnesium. 

Magnesium in massive form, as sticks 
or rods, is used to deoxidize other metals 
in foundries and is a constituent of 
alloys. More magnesium is now used as 
a deoxidizer or scavenger in metallurgy 
than for any other purpose, but its em- 
ployment in alloys is increasing and may 
eventually become the largest one. An 
alloy of magnesium and aluminum is used 
in making castings for aircraft engines 
and parts of airplanes. The skeleton of 
the British airship R-34, the first dirigible 
to cross the Atlantic, is an alloy of alumi- 
num and magnesium, and the yacht 
Resolute, the defender of the America's 
cup in the races in July, 102(1, as well as 
the alternative defender the Vanitie, car- 
ried gaffs made of this alloy. 

The demand for metallic magnesium has 
slackened since the war, howe\er, and in 
1919 its production in the United States 
amounted to 127,465 pounds, value. 1 al 
$247,302, a decrease of 55 per cent in quan- 
tity and 60 per cent in value from 1018. A 
report on the magnesium industry in 1919, 
by R. W. Stone, can be obtained free on 
application to the Director, U. S. Geolo- 
gical Survey, Washington, D. C. 



TAX ON LAND VALUES 



METAL LIGHTER THAN ALUMINUM 



The lightest metal now known that re- 
mains comparatively unaltered under 



( Ipposition to the Ralston-Nolan bill 

for a 1 per cent tax on land values C fos- 
tered by big interests and "professional" 
farmers, says the Farmers' < >pen forum, 
bulletin of allied farmers' organizations 
that maintain legislative headquarters in 
this city. 

The bill exempts land values up to 
$10,000 and the Open Forum cites statis- 
tics to show that this measure will not 
affect bona fide farmers, whose land 
values average much less than $10,000. 

The Open Forum refers to the 1907 
official report of the New York City tax 
commission, which stated that the as- 
sessed value of the land of six square 
miles in the neighborhood of Central park 
(the most exclusive part of the city) is 
greater than the assessed value of all the 
real estate of the state of Missouri. 

"In the New York Times of May 13," 
says the Open Forum, "is displayed on 
the front page the story of a $40,000,000 
real estate deal. The project is the im- 
provement of two city blocks by buildings 

to cost $25,000,000. " The land" is to be 
leased not sold -for 21 years, at an ag- 



gregate rental of SI 5,000,000 or an aver- 
age of over $700,000 a year. 

"If any farmer will take a little time 
fo figure what the value of the e two city 
blocks is that can command a bare land 
value rental of $700,000 a year, estimated 
on any reasonable interest return basis, he 
will get a pretty clear idea of what is 
meant by land values, and where the great 
bulk of land values is to be found." 



WOULD STOP OCEAN'S TIDE 



Nice Chancellor Backes of Newark, Y. 
).. has received enough publicity to qualify 
for the "movies" because of his decision 
that a union-shop contract "has found no 
judicial sponsor," and that a strike to en- 
force a union shop contract is illegal. 

"In whatever form organized labor has 
asserted it (the union shop), the judiciary 
of the country," said the chancellor, "has 
responded uniformly that it is inimical to 
the freedom of individual pursuit guaran- 
teed by the fundamental law of the land 
and contravenes public policy." 

After the chancellor delivered this 
some verdict in an attempt to stop the 
ocean's tide he retired from the center of 
the stage while the various units of the 
trade union movement continue signing 

union shop agreements in increasing num- 
bers. 

The chancellor's wrath was directed .:t 

structural iron workers who refused to 
work for Donnell-Zane company, sub-con- 
tractors, on a building in this city, be 
they employed non-union iron workers on 
a job in Yew York city. The linn at- 
tempted to employ non-unionists on its 
Yew ark job, but the architect info 
them that the contract called for union 
men. The sub-contractors refused to rec- 
ognize that part of the contract and the 
architect notified the main contractor thai 
the contract would be cancelled if union 
men were not used. 



NO TAX ON IDLE LAND 



"One of the curious things in conne< 
tion with our war taxes," says the taxa- 
tion press bureau, "is the fact that no 
federal tax has been laid upon idle laud. 
Taxes have been laid upon incomes, upon 
profits and upon all manner of business. 
but not one cent does the federal govern- 
meni gel from those who own the unused 
lands of the country, which have increased 
in value so enormously. 

"This ownership represents a stupend- 
ous sum. The committee of manufac- 
turers and merchants on federal taxation 
with headquarters at Chicago, estimates 
that between $50,000,000,000 and $60,000,- 
000,000 worth of vacant land pays no 
taxes at all to the federal government. This 
leaves the whole war burden upon busi- 
ness and upon those who do the work of 
the country. 

"To correct this evil the Ralston-Nolan 
bill, now pending in congress, lays a tax 
of 1 per cent on land values, without im- 
provements Over $10,000. This includes 
urban, agricultural, coal, oil. mn 
timber, water power lands, etc. The tax 
would return to the government about 
$1,000,000,000 and permit the remission ol 
that amount from taxes on industry that 
enter into prices and increase the cost 
of living." 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



ATLANTIC COAST AND GULF 

(Continued from Page 9) 



recently been sold to George W. McNear 
of San Francisco. 

Comrade Miller further reports that the 
Four-masted bark "Falls of Clyde," owned 
by the same concern, has just arrived at 
Port Arthur to load for Denmark. We hope 
that her skipper will lie equally successful 
in obtaining a crew through the Seamen's 
Union. James If Williams. 



AN EVENING AT HOME 



For the first time since their new club- 
house and branch headquarters was opened 
on June 15, 1020, at 260 President street, 
Prooklyn, the Scandinavian section en- 
joyed the privilege of entertaining Presi- 
dent TT. P. Griffin, Secretary W. L. Cart- 
ledge and Business Agent David Grange 
of the Marine Cooks' and Stewards' Asso- 
ciation of the Atlantic and Gulf, at a spe- 
cial supper and fraternal and social gather- 
ing on the evening of August 20. 

The event of the evening was the reg- 
ular weekly meeting of the branch, which 
preceded the social functions. The meet- 
ing was largely attended by an intensely 
interested and highly enthusiastic audience 
of vouthful Scandinavians, many of whom 
are still serving, though for American 
wages and practically under American 
conditions, in ships flying their own na- 
tional flags. 

All listened attentively and decorously 
to the stirring and illuminating addresses 
made by the visiting officials, lustily ap- 
plauding every point scored by the 
speakers. 

The English language was so well un- 
derstood by the audience that no interpre- 
tation of the speakers' remarks was nec- 
essary. 

After the meeting the house party and 
quests adjourned to the spacious mess-hall, 
where an elegant but substantial supper 
was served, and was highly enjoyed by all 
assembled. 

After supper the entire company repaired 
to the meeting hall on the first floor, which 
had been cleared for action and set in order 
meanwhile. 

So the auspicious evening ended with 
music, dancing, new stories and old son^s. 
and social diversions and felicitations of 
the happiest kind. 

To make the festivities more enjoyable 
and sociable, President Griffin and Secre- 
tary Cartledge brought some members of 
their families along to grace the affair. 
With Mr. Griffin was his son Harry. Jr., 
a well-grown lad of 15, who is now attend- 
ing the high school and intends to learn 
all he can in order to become a prominent 
and successful union advocate like his 
daddy some day. 

With Mr. Cartledge were Mrs. Cartledge 
and their youngest daughter, Ruth, aged 
nine. 

Our combined business meeting and 
house party provided a most suitable and 
auspicious initiation of the Scandinavian 
Branch, which has been a unit of the In- 
ternational Seamen's ("nit in of America 
just one year, having affiliated on August 
30. 1919. ' 

After the entertainment our guests were 
shown over the spacious and comfortable 
premises and expressed themselves as 



highly pleased and deeply impressed with 
all they saw. And Business Agent and 
Mrs. E. V. Roren were showered with 
well deserved and unstinted plaudits of 
praise and encouragement for their very 
efficient and unselfish services, both to 
their fellow countrymen and the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union. 

James H. Williams. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



REPORT BY SCHARRENBERG 

(Continued from page 2) 



particular, expressed confidence that there would 
be no cause of complaint on that score. 

On the question of revising the German sea- 
men's law we had a long and interesting discus- 
sion. Paul Muller, for many years past the 
editor of the Seamen's official paper and the 
chief executive of the seamen's section of Ger- 
man Transport Workers' Union, had on previous 
occasions opposed the American proposals for 
"the right to quit," etc. It developed, however, 
that there had been an all-around misunder- 
standing upon the main points in the American 
program. At any rate, Paul Muller stated that 
since 1892 he, personally, had favored the 
abolition of imprisonment for desertion. 

Altogether, the conference was a decided suc- 
cess — because it removed misunderstanding and 
on the issues of most vital importance to the 
world's seamen it resulted in a virtual agreement 
by the men who guide the destinies of the Ger- 
man Transport Workers' Union. 

As regards the affiliation of this union with 
the International Seafarers' Federation it was 
said that they would not "beg to be admitted," 
but would consider an invitation to join. 

Subsequently, at the Brussels meeting of the 
International Seafarers' Federation, the applica- 
tion for affiliation made by the independent Ger- 
man Seamen's Union was rejected. 

Then, on motion of one of the delegates from 
the British Seamen's Union, the two factions of 
German seamen were urged to get together 
in one union and then come into the Federation. 

I did not find it necessary to visit the Sea- 
men's Union of Holland because there were 
ample assurances that the union would be ably 
represented at the Brussels conference. It 
should be noted that the representatives of the 
Holland seamen voted with the American dele- 
gates in the Genoa meeting. 

The Belgian Seamen's Union, with headquar- 
ters at Antwerp, is an organization with several 
sections, as follows: Sailors and firemen, cooks 
and stewards, etc., boiler-sealers, ship-painters, 
and fishermen. Nearly all their officers speak 
several languages and I had no difficulty in 
making their acquaintance. It will suffice to say 
that delegates from the Belgian Seamen's Union 
changed their attitude toward the American pro- 
posals and voted for them at the Brussels con- 
ference. 

Antwerp is one of the busiest ports on earth. 
Tt is now the starting point of 89 navigation 
companies, many of the jines going to all parts 
of the world. It is also the calling point of 40 
foreign lines. This is in striking contrast to the 
cemetery-like aspect of the port of Hamburg. 
Fraternally, 
PAUL SCHARRENBERG. 



WORTH WHILE SUGGESTIONS 

(Continued from Page 7) 



twenty-five years. I was also a personal friend 
and admirer of that grand man who has re- 
cently "Crossed the Bar". The late Hon. 
James G. Maguire, the author of the Maguire 
Act, the first law which went toward making 
the American Sailor free. If he had been 
permitted to have his way, he would have made 
the ships free too. 

I believe that ships, and the movements of 
ships, are very much hampered by unnecessary 
red tape. I believe with Franklin K. Lane that, 
"The place for red tape is in the furnace." 

In short, I believe in free trade. However, 
also quoting from the theory of Henry George, 
I would not only free trade from the exactions 
of the tax gatherers at our international borders, 
but I would free it from the exactions of the 
tax gatherers at home. 

I believe in the same freedom for men that 
the birds enjoy — freedom to come — freedom to 
go — freedom to do as they please, provided — 
always provided, that they do not interfere with 
any other man's rights. 

If I were a sea gull, sojourning at Santa 
Barbara say, living on sardines and other fish, 
and fish happened to get scarce, and I flew 
down the coast to San Pedro, where fish were 
more plentiful, would any other sea gull say, 
"Hold on there! You can't fish there unless you 
give me one third, or one half of what you 
catch!" 

No, only man is foolish enough to tolerate 
such a system as that. 

If you really want to encourage ships and 
shipbuilding, I beg to suggest that you ask 
the tax gatherers to get off of their backs. 



(Continued from Page 5) 



LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark Street 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Secretary 

THOS. A. HANSON. Treasurer 

Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue. Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, WIS CHAS. BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON, Agent 

74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO. O S. R. DYE, Agent 

618 Front Street. Phone Bell Navarre 1823 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y J. MURPHY, Agent 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 B. DAFOE, Agent 

3308 E. 92nd Street. Phone South Chicago 7666 

SUPERIOR, Wis W. EDGEWORTH, Agent 

332 Banks Avenue 

CONNEAUT, O W. J. WILSON, Agent 

992 Day Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 71 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 48 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary 

ED HICKS, Treasurer 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

Phone 428-W 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone Broad 131 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 3308 E. 92nd Street 

Phone South Chicago 7666 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

Phone Bell, Navarre 1823 

CLEVELAND, 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 44 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, HI 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 571 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND. Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash ...64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203. Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 41 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 188 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaska 

UNGA Alaaka 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA, Ore P- O. Box 188 

FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 

C. W. DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 

STOCKTON, Cal P. E. McFARLANE, Agent 

46 West Main Street 



B. C. COAST STEWARDS 
FRED WALSH, Secretary 
VANCOUVER. B. C 347 Pender Str««t 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



In an appeal to members to pay 
their dues, the Fori Smith, Ark., 
Business Men's Club states thai some 
,,f the reci ipts were used in the nor 
union shop campaign. These low 
wage advocates say. "Mr. Business 
Man, arc you contributing your 
funds to fight the pi ople who 'make- 
it possible for you to be in busi- 
ness?" 

The Wyandotte County District 
Court has set aside that portion of 
the Kansas "can't-strike" law which 
makes it illegal for one person to 
urge another person to strike, I he 
cour t disi worker who was 

charged with "influencing." Oppo- 
nents of the law say the decision 
is a body blow to the PeO 
Act. as the court's ruling 
of the most important provision 
the Allen plan. The State will pa- 
peal the decision. 

In his report to the convention 
of the International Broom 
Whisk Makers' Union, General Sec- 
retary-Treaasurer Boyer stated that 
during the past year "100 per cent, 
of our members have secured in- 
creased wages and improved condi- 
tions of employment through the 
organization, in most instances with- 
out a strike or any lengthy contro- 
versy. Practically all of the large 
broom centers are organized and in 
most of these places we have work- 
ing agreements." 

The average rice exports of the 
entire United States during the pe- 
riod from 1910 and 1914 were less 
than 20,000,000 pounds a year; today 
they run from 30,(100,(10(1 to 60 
000 pounds a month. Last year Cali- 
fornia rice mills handled $21,000,000 
worth of grain. The first commer- 
cial rice field in the State was 
planted in the Sacramento valli 
1°12. The California rice growers 
prophesy they "will show the Ameri- 
can people that rice i- one oi the 
finest foods in the world." 

In a report issued by tin- Canadian 
Department of Labor this reference 
is made to affiliates of the A. F. of 
I..: "In Canada the international 
trade unions have a total member- 
ship of about 200,000; then- policies 
are well known. In the industrial 
field they endeavor, bj -rafts, to 
negotiate agreements with employers 
by direct conference or arbitratii 
strike always being a last resort." 

Several shipbuilding and ship re- 
pair shops in Mobile. Ala., have de- 
clared for the non-union shop. Re- 
cently metal workers struck for 
higher wages and improved working 
iditions and now- the yards declare 
for individual bargaining. They will 
employ union men. the) say, but they 

want it understood that not enough 
will be employed to make effective 
any change in working conditions. 
This system is what the employers 
call the "American" plan. 

Strikes in the coal industry are not 
affecting production, according to 
the United States Geological Survey. 
During the week ending August 28 
bituminous coal mined totaled 11,- 
174.000 tons. This i s an increase of 
nearly 500,000 tons over the preced- 
ing week. Anthracite production 
totaled 1.800,000 net tons for the 
week ending August 28, an increase 
■ ■i 205,000 tons over the preceding 
week. During this period there were 

several thousand anthracite miners 
on strike in the Pittston i Pa, I lis 
trict. 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
.luring that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 



Abolln, K. 
Andersen, B. A. 

-1410 
Andersen, J. F. 
Andersen, C. D. 

-1131 
Baskes, Jack 
Anderson, Karl A. 
Anderson, Gus 
Anderson, K. P. 
Anderson, H. 
Anderson. Jack 

Back, Soren 
Baumgartel, A. 
Backstrom, C. 
Barenteg, Joe 
Ballah, Lee 
Berg, H. J. 
Berglund. Iver 
Harrington, P. 
Berger, Aug. 
Belmont. Joe 
Bergkvlst, Axel 
Bergesen, Blrger 

Carlson, M. -906 
Carr, A. 

Campbell, John R. 
Chrlstensen, B. O. 

H. 
Dantelsen, O. B. 
Oegerstedt, Karl 
Devlch, Joseph 
Donovan, J. J. 
Donnelly, R. A. 

Edln, Gust 
Engberg, O. L. 
Engvall, J. A. 
Felsch, Chas. 
Fprnandez, Elislo 
Fex, Andrew 
Framnes, Ivar 
Oabrlelsen, Peder 
Gaughan. Tom 
Gran, Aksel 
Oravander, Nils 
Gretghan, P. 

Hansen, S. P. -2794 
Hansen, Nels -2072 
Hansen, Ed. 
Hansen, Edgar 
Hansen, Oscar 
Harms, E. B 
Haltnes, M. 
Hansen, Frank 

Jonas, H. A. 
Johnson, Jack 
.Tohanson, C. 
Johnson, Clarence 

A. 
Jacobs, Fulton 
Johnson, E. B. 
Johnson, J. 
Johnson, Harry 
Kallo, K. 
Karlson, Ingvald 
Karlson, G. A. -1190 
Karlsnn. Louis 
Knskinan, Alluri 
Kallinan, Frank 
K. N., -1013 
Kempsen, M. 
Kearney, Hugh 
Kerton, Lester 
Lampe, Fred 
Larsen, Lars 
Lambert, E. A. 
Larsen, Herman 
Lauritsen, Ludvig 
Langman, Wm. 
Leason. J. A. 
Lllquest, Rudolf 
Martlnsen, Ingvald 
Mattson, Hilding 
Maline, Stanley 
McLean, Angus 
McVlcar, P. 
Meyer, Frank 
Mlckelson, Harry 
Mleklans, J. 
McPherson, R. 
McDonald, J. 
Nelsen, Anton 
Nelsen, H. -1460 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, N. J. 
Neilson, O. 
Oberg, J. 
Ohm, Henrich 
Olsen, Fred A. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, E. O. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, Nick 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, K. M. 
Pettersen, Eric 
Pettersen, Kristlan 
Petersen, BJarne 
Peterson, Oscar 
Rlchaw3s»n, J. W. 
Richardson, B C. 
Rod, S. 
Ruhr. Hans 
Sale, John 
Saarnl, Frank 
Salvesen, T. 
Samuelsen, H. N, 
Schurr, Harm 
Schelenz, C. 
Scott, W. N. 
Sickjnan, A. 
Slnnla, G. 
Slmonsen, I. 
Slmondsen. H 



Andersen, O. -1339 
Anderson, J. -556 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, Chris 
Anderson, G. N. B. 
Andersen, Adrian 
Anderson, B. E. 
Anderson, Hllmer 
Alonzo, N. 
Axelsen, Herman 
Axelsen. George 

Bendixon, Hans 
Berntsen, Nils 
Bingham, Dexter 
Blomgren, Adolf 
Bllndlielm, A. B. 
Blomgren. Carl 
Boyle, Andrew 
Bi-ptsen, Jos. 
Brown, H. 
Brown. Martin 
Braun, T. 
Bunden, L. W. 

Chekan, W. 
Clifford, H. W. 
Clair, A. 
Clark, Sterling 

Dunham, Dexter 
Duncan, T. W. 
Dunne, F. 
Dutton, Henry 

Erlkson, Elner 
Erlkson, B. -38 

Franzell, A. 
Fredrlksen, B. D. 
Ferslund, Victor 

Graham, E. 
Gragan, J. H. 
Gutisen, J. H. 
Gustafsen, Oscar 
Gns.laas, Oscar 

Hansen, Immanuel 
Helmer, Fred 
Herlltz, Ivor 
Hlekka. E. J. 
Hasselberg, Gustaf 
Hare, Hans 
Hoopes, Bill 
Hahnqvlst, E. J. 

Johnson, Gatterd 
Johnson. Chris 
.Tohansen. O. 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson. .John S. 
Jensen, V. J. 
Jorgensen. Adrian 
Jorgensen. D. 
Jullsen, C. A. 
Keane, John 
Kisor, Adlai 
Kelly, John 
Klahn. Karl 
Klenk, K. A. 
Koppen. O. 
Kristensen. N., 1093 
Krlstensen. K. 
Kukes, Conrad 
Kuten, Alex. 
Lindholm, A. 
Lindstrom, Geo, 
Lllburger, Wm. 
Llnne, Theodore 
Lokken, O. K. 
Lundgren, Carl 
Lund. Erik 
Lynch, J. P. 
McCoy, J. L. 
McKenzle, Dan. 
Miller, S. 
Monrad, Trygue 
Molurg. K. G. E. 
Monroe, N. S. 
Mosley, S. E. 
Murphy, Thos. 
Muler, James 

Nelsen, Oscar 
Newman, J. S. 
Nielsen. C. L. 
Norsheim, Ben 
Nordstrom, A. R. 
Olsen, Louis 
Olsen, O. -597 
Odella, V. 
Olsen, Kristlan 
Olsson. K. W. -972 
Owens, James 
O'Donnell, J. 
Person, Johan 
Peel, P. 

Peterson, John E. 
Pinerd, F. H. 
Piplor.e, J. 
Prlnz, Carl 
Runsten, Arthur 
Rylander, R. 
Rysock, M. van 



I, 



Smith, C. J. 
Smeland, John 
SommerfpH. P. 
Solum. M 
Soroos, S. 
R. 
Sterndoch, J. 
Strand, C. 
Stuhr, H. M. 
Svenson, Thure 
8verdrup, Walter 



Sjoberg, G. 
Slandart, M. 
Taice, John 
Tangvalt, G. J. 
Thornqulst, A. 
Unwen, Harry 
Verst, C. A. 
Ward, Fred 
Watson, L. 
Wall, W. 
Whete, R. E. 
Williams, L. A. 
Wilhelmsen, S. 



Symons, W. A. 

Thorn, Arvid 
Thor, L. 
Thorpe, J. W. 
Vilen, I. 
Vaher, C. 
Wilhelmsen, S. 
Wilson, C. 
Wright, H. 
White, R. E. 
Ylonen, S. 
J. Yorkvelt, A. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, John 

(registered) 
Anderson, E. F. 

(registered) 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, Andrew 
Brandt, H. 
Berke, C. 
Barton, M. 
Brun, Mattias 
Bedford, A. 
Bradsbery, Geo. 
Carlson, Oscar 
Forsman, Niels 
Hansen, Johan G. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hanson. Halvor 
Halvorsen, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Hans 



Janson, John 
Johanesen. Alf. 
Johnson, Karl 
Johannesen. Jonas 
Johanson, Emil 
Jorgensen, Jack 
Kepper, Henry 
Kinnunnen, Ant. 
Olsen, Alf 
Petersen. Hans 
Roneld, P. 
Randmets, Mike 
Risenius, Sven 
Saro, W. R. 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Toren, Gustaf 
Tourela, Eriek 
Vejvorda, Frank 
Wattel. P. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Alaska Fishermen's Letter List 



Andersen, Oscar 
Anderson, Hilding 
A. T,. N. 
Bakinen, John 
Bjorseth, Konrad 
Carlson, Gust 
de Blom, A. 
Ericson, Rob 
Krickson. John 
Groth, J. 
Hansen, Emanuel 
Hansen, Anton 
Hakanson, Ingvar 
Isakson, Eriek 
Jaeobsen, Jack 
.Tohansen, F. C. 
Johansen. Karl W. 
Johnson, John 
Karlson, George 
Kjerdalen, Ole 
Kristoffersen. H. O. 
Leskinen. Fred 
Levele, Ed. 
Llndeberg. Ernest 
Lauren, William 
Lund, Frank 



McNeill, I'aniel 

Ross 
Moxnes. Chris. 
Mikelsen, P. 
Newton, A. B. 
Olofson, Charps 
Osterman, John 
Olsen, Thorn 
Olsen, John 
Ome, Tobias 
Olsen, George 
Peterson, Frank 
Rasmussen. Peter 
Skovba, Nils 
Shivers, Witt. 
Svenson, August 
Schultz, Walter 
Tennison, Peter 
Wamsa, August 

Peter 
Registered Letters 
Cranzzi, Rosolino 
Meyer, Hans 
Mittenmeyer, J. 
Rasmussen, P. 
Smith, R. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of John B. Isaacs will please notify 
Chas. F. Bullock, Marine Cooks' and 
Stewards' Association, 321 Twentieth 
street, Galveston, Texas. Matter of 
great importance. 3-31-20 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Porter" are requested to call at the 
Secretary's office for their vouchers 
for salvage services rendered to 
S. S. "Washington" on or about 
November 5, 1919. The vouchers are 
issued to the following members, 
and the respective amounts due 
thereon is as follows: 

Amtidsen, R $22.50 

Kttgene, John 22.50 

Makinen, K 22.50 

Mattson, Geo. J 22.50 

Relmstrom, A 26.25 

Sjoholm, J. W 22.50 

Any one knowing the nearest rela- 
tives of C. C. Stewart, a late member 
of the Marine Firemen's Union of 
the Atlantic, are kindly requested to 
communicate with the Secretary of 
the above organization at 70 South 
St., New York, N. Y. 3-3-20 

Rudolf Knutsson is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of h.s 
brother, J. Harvid Knutsson, a na- 
tive of Trellerborg, Sweden, age 
20, last heard from in New York, 
in April, 1918. Please address his 
brother, care Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, 59 Clay street, San Fran 
cisco, Calif. 1-7-20 

Albert Nord, a native of Sweden, 
is inquired for by his brother, David 
Nord, General Postoffice, Brisbane, 
Australia 5-19-20 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABBL 

CLOTHER, FURNISHER A. HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium in 

Connection 
Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1890 

MENS CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS 

and FURNISHING GOODS 

108-110 Main Street Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hat* 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



^Seamen's Outfitters 
C. P. Salmi & Co. 

Men's Furnishings 

Shoes, Hats and Oiled Clothing 

411 EAST HERON STREET 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - • Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 
EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 
Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts.. Aberdeen, Wash. 

1st and Commercial St*., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of Karl Reese, age 30, last heard of 
in Iqnique, Chile, October, 1916, bark 
Herbert," will please notify George 
Zimera, Sailors' Union, P. O. Box 
65, Seattle, Wash. 1-21-20 



Tacoma Letter List. 

■<•■■/.. Joseph Rellly, Ralph 



Gronlund, > • 
Johnson, John 

Emll 
Mattson, Walter 

Melgail, Mikel 
Person, Fritz. 

Leonard 
Ralnhard. H. 



Rydellus, Help 
Rhumko, Nick 
Smith, John 

Smith, Carl 
Svanson. Harold 
Swanson. H. -1216 
Thaysen, Arthur 
Thompson, T. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Op., Letter List 



Ahren, Wm. I.aine. A A 

Andersen, A. C Lalne, John 

Andersson, Axel Larsen, Hans 

Andersson, Carl l.arsson, Ragnar 

Anderson, A. B. Larson, C. J. -1632 

Anderson, J. A. Leisig. John 

Anderson, Ed. Lindner, John P. 

Anderson, Gunnar Lovell, G. 

Andersson, Bill Lnndgren Gu«t 

Anderson, Herman Malech. Frank E. 

Anderson. Carl E. Malkoff, Peter 

Austin, Ed. Matson. R. M. 

Amundsen, Ben MrCroskey. Ray A. 

Alakaihn, Moses McGregor. Thos. 

Allen, I. J. McLeod, Angus 

Alsic, Karl McLean, M. R. 

Bach, Soren Mlkkelsen. Harry 

Backman, Peter Moyer, Geo. E. 

Bieler, Ben Neilsen, H. J. 

Blake, Frank Nelson, . Nels 

Bohm, Gust Nelsson, C. 

Bohm, Franz Neullng. G. A. 

Carmelie, Guiseppe Nilsen, Christ 

Custer, Kenneth R. Norberg, John E. 

Panilson. Albln Olsen, Michael 

Darlington, Wm. Olson, T. 

Davison, Jim Olson, John 

Diez. H. Pederson, Geo. 

Dooly, Frank E. Peterson, Mauritz 

Douglas, Joseph Petersen, Knut 

Durett, J. H. Pehte, Frank L. 

Erickson, J. Preston. E. 

Erickson, Hans E. Pyne, J. W. 

Ellegard, M. Raanes, Johan 

Engler, S. H. Rader, Allen 

Enberg, Elnar Rautio, Jack 

Fogelberry, Harry Reiman. Tovo H. 

Forsberg, Swen S. Rier, Earl W. 

Fugman, Arthur Robertson, E. J. 

Gflkison, A. F Robles, Frank 

Golden, Roy L. Ross. Geo. 

Graff, John D. Salne, Arthur A. 

Gronbeck, H. Salonen. Victor 

Gruber, J. Salln, Tolvo H. 

Halley, W. Sandvik, S. G. 

Hanson, August Scott M 

Hanson, Oskar W. Shalin, Nils 

Hardie, Wallace Sibley, M. 

Hogstrnm. Karl I. Sinclair, P. 

Holland, E. A. Smith, Carl J. 

Heino, Gust Slade, I. S. 

Henrlkson, Geo. Spencer. Tom 

Huher. Charles S. Stout R. E. 

Hurley, Michael Sutse.' Michel 

Irmey, Feodor Svansson. Ernest 

Jacobs, Fulton Taylor, Bert 

Jernberg. Alfred Thomson, Henry 

Jespersen, Martin Thorsen. Chas 

Johnson, Emil Tinstrom, A. R. 

Johanson, S. Tuhkanen, John J. 

Johnson. Louis Walmough, P. 

Jones, E. L». Walter, E. 

Kalfholm, Edw. Wallace, Chess C. 

Kauko, Axel Wikstrom, Carl 

Kelly, Norman Willis, Samuel 

Kennedy, B. L. Wood, E. E. 

Kjellberg, A. C. Wolf, Herbert 

Klaver, R. Walters, Fred L. 

Krause, Frank Worn, Otje 
Krlstiansen, Wm. A. 

San Pedro Letter List 



Aho, Jack 

Andersen, J. -2157 
Anderson, C. 
Andersen, C. 
Anderson, Sven 
Arentsen, John 
Arnesen. Isak 
Aspe, Theodor 
Belmont, Toe 
Bentley, Clifford 
Bengtsson, Sigfried 
Bergeson, B. 
Berglund, Emil J. 
Bergstrom. .1 
Brast, Sjomans 
Braden, W. A. 
Beschorner, Robert 
Brown, Irving W. 
Bye, Kristian 
Burge, Larence 
Cage, Tom 
Carlsson, Chas. 
Cariera. Peter 
Carr, R. W. 
Craig, Thomas 
Cowan, Wm. L. 
Church, C. E. 
Davis. Orvllle 
Daw, Walter 
Deaver. Alvi" 
Desmond,, Albin 
Doty, Erwin 
Daunt, C. 
Dreger, Jack 
Dragich, Peter 
Drennan, W, N. 
Eliasen, John 
Ek. William 
England. Thomas 
Evans, Wllbert 
Evensen. Alex 
Farrell. H. D. 
Feeder, Geo. 
Fickle Omer 
Fottinger, Karl A. 
Kolvlk, Ludvig 
Forde, Alfred 
Frair, Enoch 
Freiberg, P. 
Franzell, A. H. 
Kreitag, F. 
Gayton, H. L. 
CrasH<>n, Joe 
Gronthal. Arthur 
Golden, Roy 
iiuuiici ud\ Ulrik 
Hansen. O'-if 
Hellsten, G. 



Hermanson, Carl 
Holland, Jonnie 
Hermanson, ('ail 
Hey, Ben. 
Hickey, John 
Hogstedt, Chas. 
Houston, Robert 
Hurley, Michael 
Jacobsen, Jack -2445 
Jacobsen. Tom 
Janofy, Axel 
Jensen, Marius 
Jensen, Kristian 
Jeeden, George 
Johnson, Carl B, 
Johansen, Antmi 
Johansen, Johan W. 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen, J. -1432 
Johnson. G"ortr- 
Johansen, J. -2314 
Johnson, P. -2313 
Johnson, Waldron 
Jonassen. Johannes 
Keel, Jewell 
Kelty. Peter 
Kenrich, Richard 
Ketelsen, FieuK. 
Keegan, J . 
Klieman, Otto 
Klementsen, Alf 
Kootz, Fred 
Knudsen Andrew 
Kruse, Henry 
Kristoffersen, Hans 
Laine John 
Landborg. Chas. 
Larsen. Johan -1542 
Lauritzen, Ole 
Levine, Carl 
Lindholm, chas. 
Lill. Karl 
Lind, Gustav 
Llmlst mm, John 
Llndeberg. Ernest 
Lowrey, John R. 
Lodersen, John 
Lorgeman. Fred 
Lobeles, Jose 
Lund. F. V. -2010 
Lucander, Hjalmar 
Maaha, W ill.\ 
Magnussen, John 
Martinson J.-i;K47 
Mato. Alexander 
McNeill. John 
McGhee, E J 
McRae, Jack 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 

SUITS AND A11 . , 

OVERCOATS Established AU W ° rk d ° ne m 

to Order at Popular for 20 years our own sanitar y 

Prices workshop 

Represented by £ PEGUILLAN 



Books for You 
While at Sea 

ADVENTURE — SEAMANSHIP 
ROMANCE— HISTORY— TRAVEL 
SCIENCE— GREAT MEN'S LIVES 

Books to Help You Spend Idle Hours in a 
Pleasant and Worth While Way 

For a Free Crew's Library 
Exchangeable at Any Time 

Apply to 

American Library Association 

34 Sacramento Street San Francisco 

Phone Sutter 6985 

Or to other A. L. A. Agencies in Almost Any American Port 

These books are provided free for your use by the people 
of the United States through the American Library Association. 

When you have finished with them, they may be exchanged 
for another collection at any office of the American Library 
Association, or they may be exchanged for any A. L. A. collection 
on board another boat. 

In fairness to the men on the next ship receiving this collection 
you should take reasonable care to prevent loss or damage to 
any book. 



Mlze, J. H. 
Mehrtens, Carl 
Moor, Peter 
Monson, Edvin 
Moritz, W. 
Murphy, Francis J. 
Nauta. H. 
Nankinen, Fred 
Nelson, Ernest 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nelson. Gns 
Nilsson, Edward 
Ogren, Victor E. 
Olofsen, O. A. 
Olsen, Ole 
Olsen. Harold 
Olsson. Otto 
Pett, Dick 
Petersen, Hu(0 
Peterson, August 
Raaum. Harry 
Rasmussen. Swend 
Roberts, Bob 
Roberts, J. W. 
Robertson, E. 
Robinson, Fred C. 
Rod. Halfdan 
Rossdam, Harry 
Rosenthal. " 
Rohman, Pete 
Runge, R. 
Rueter. Amandus 
Sahlberg, Rudolf 
Sanders, Chas. 
Sandberg. N. A. 
Saxby, Charles 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Salin, Henry 
Schladen. H. 
Scaharry, Jacob 
Sehaumberg, W. 
Scottol, Andrew 



Scrivers, W. 
Seland, Hans 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Soder, Paul 
Strehle, F. 
Strauss, Walter 
Steen, Ivar 
Stensland Paul 
Strom. Oscar 
Stenberg, Alfred 
Sternd-ock, John 
Steffensen, Hans 
Sundqulst, Walter 
Sunde, O. 
Sullivan, Jack 
Swindells, William 
Swanson, Mr. 
Swanson, Eric K. 
Thomsen, Thomas 
Treiberg, Peter 
Veckenstedt, W. 
Viscarra, Oscar 
Voth, Gus 
Wenneraulst. Anton 
Wilhelmson, Karl 
Wlnkelman, Otto 
Wilson. .Tnhn 
Woods, Claude F. 
Wrobluvski, Paul 
Zimmerman, Fritz 
Zunde-«T Theo 
Packages 
Hansen, Oscar W. 
Nan in en, Fred 
Roberson, Ole 
Erickson, E. R. 
Nanhinen, Fred. 
Peters, J. M. 
Pinnington, H. D. 
Young, William 
Zoerb. Wall ■ 



INFORMATION WANTED 



The Centrale Bond Van Trans- 
portarbeiders have placed in my 

hands claim of the father and 
mother of L. Verhoef, seaman who 
met his death on the S. S. "Balosaro" 
April 29, 1920. An old spring line 
broke, curled around Verhoef's left 
leg and yanked him on to the winch 
while he was operating' it. Before 
it could be stopped his leg was taken 
off. lie died two hours later at the 
hospital. Will members of the crew 

please report here promptly. The 

master has made an entry in the log 
book to the effect that the deceased 
met with his death through intoxi- 
cation, which statement we believe 
to he utterly false. I am acting foi 
the dependent relatives. It is the 
duty of seamen to tell the truth. 
Your dependents may he in 'he same 
position some day, S. B. Axtell. 

8-25-20 



* 


A 


Home 


News 





President Wilson has officially in- 
vited former Premier Orlando of 
Italy to visit the United States. 

Railroads were authorized by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission to 
enforce new freight rates and pas- 
senger fares until November 1 with- 
out observing the long and short 
haul clause of the interstate com- 
merce act. 

One hundred and fifty-one con- 
victions have been obtained in the 
campaign of the Department of 
Justice against profiteering. Since 
the campaign was instituted 1854 
arrests have been made and 1499 
indictments returned. 

An offer of $160,000 for the naval 
ordnance plant at Dayton, O., sub- 
mitted by John F. Ohmer of Day- 
ton, is being considered by the Navy 
Department. The plant was pur- 
chased during the war for the manu- 
facture of fire control instruments. 

Contingents of the United States 
Army are being maintained in ten 
widely separated sections of the 
world. Out of a total strength of 
203,870, units in continental United 
States comprise 153,000; in the Phil- 
ippines, roughly 20,000; Germany, 
15,690; Hawaii, 4600; Panama, 4350; 
Porto Rico, 1500; China, 1500; Alas- 
ka, 890; France, 138; and England, 
13. 

Retail sugar prices will not drop 
before January 1, and they may in- 
crease, John B. Floyd, special agent 
of the Department of Justice "flying 
squadron" of profiteer hunters, an- 
nounced after a conference with offi- 
cials of three large refining com- 
panies and representatives of whole- 
sale grocers. The possibility of a 
greater sugar shortage than was felt 
last year also was indicated by 
Floyd. 

During the first six months of 1920, 
57,080,740 pounds of rice were ex- 
ported from San Francisco to for- 
eign ports, the Dutch East Indies, 
Chile and Canada taking most of the 
shipments. In addition, a quantity of 
rice imported into San Francisco 
from China and Siam were re-ex- 
ported to Colombia and other south- 
ern countries. It is bought by Chi- 
nese, who decline to eat Japanese 
or American rice which is of the 
Japanese type. 

The Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission has assumed jurisdiction 
over the Mackay companies, known 
as the Postal Companies and the 
Commercial Cable Company, and 
ordered them to file annual reports 
beginning from 1917 and to make 
full statements of their books and 
records. The Mackay companies 
had refused to report to the Com- 
mission, but afterward a stipulation 
was signed admitting the Commis- 
sion's jurisdiction only over the 
lines of the companies situated 
within the United States. 

Tentative plans for the construc- 
tion of a large dirigible hangar at 
the Naval aviation base on North 
Island, San Diego, Cal., was an- 
nounced by Secretary Daniels. Al- 
though the Army, which also makes 
use of the island as an aviation 
base, lias offered some objections 
to the project, the Secretary said 
he believed these could be overcome 
through agreement of the joint aero- 
nautical hoard. The projected hangar 
would be 1000 feet long and 100 
feet high, and would be used to 
house the first Navy dirigible as- 
signed to the Pacific Coast 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



Bitter denunciation of the Denver 
daily press because of its treatment 
of the street car men's strike in that 
city marked the convention pro- 
ceedings of the State Federation ot 
Labor. A strong agitation for a 
daily newspaper, controlled by or- 
ganized labor, was developed. 

The ship "Montauk," 1366 tons, en 
route from Cebu, Philippine Islands, 
to Auckland, New Zealand, went 
ashore seven miles northeast by 
east of Line Island in Manning 
straits. Solomon group, August 4, 
a „d is believed to be a total loss. 
Captain B. L. McGrath and a crew 
of about fifteen men were saved. 

The advance of $1.50 a pound in 
the price of net twine is a serious 
matter for the fishermen of British 
Columbia, as the fishing industry is 
one of the most important in the 
Province The advance brings the 
price of nets to $3.40 and $3.50 per 
pound, which means that a net 
costing $300 before the rise will cost 
$450. In 1915 net twine sold at 
$1.63 to $1.70 per pound. 

Extensive harbor improvements 
have been planned for the two ehiet 
ports of the Canary Islands, Las 
I'almas (Grand Canary) and Santa 
Cruz (Teneriffe). These projects, 
which have been approved by the 
government at Madrid, include new 
wharves, warehousing facilities and 
everything needed by a modem port 
with a large maritime traffic. It is 
estimated that the execution of the 
plans will cost about $10,000,000 for 
each place. 

Great Britain has initiated diplo- 
matic conversations with the Amer- 
ican government as to the liability 
of the United States for expenditures 
necessitated by the detention in 
American ports of the seven former 
German liners allocated to this coun- 
try for the homeward movement of 
American troops. The ships were 
held up by the Shipping Board after 
their surrender by the War Depart- 
ment, but finally were delivered to 
England. 

The Shipping Board announces 
that it has entered into a contract 
with the Atlantic Gulf Oil Corpo- 
ration for supplying crude and fuel 
oil to be delivered over a period of 
one year beginning on or about 
January 1, 1921, in cargo lots at the 
supplier's terminal, Tecomate, Mex- 
ico, as follows: 6,000, barrels of 

fuel oil of a minimum gravity of 15° 
Beaume, at $1.25 per barrel, including 
taxes; 9,000,000 barrels of crude 
petroleum of a minimum gravity of 
20° Beaume, at $1.25 per barrel, in- 
cluding taxes. The Shipping Board 
is to provide the tank steamers to 
transport the oil. 

Japanese fisheries in South Sagha- 
lien and the Russian maritime prov- 
ince unmolested by the Bolsheviki 
have been able to make good profits, 
fishing activities in that region are 
in the hands of the Russo-Japanese 
Fishery Company, which is engaged 
in catching cod, herring and salmon. 
There are thirteen fishing grounds in 
Saghalien, operated by approximately 
33<M i fishers of this company. Thir- 
teen steamers of over a thousand 
inns each operate in this region and 
five others in Kamchatka, while live 
canneries are run in both districts. 
1 1 erring fishing shows a decrease 
this year, but that of crabs and sal- 
mon promises to be highlj satis- 
factory. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH .Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 

Deposits 63,352,269.17 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,488,107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund 330,951.36 

OFFICERS 
JOHN A. BUCK, President 
GEO. TOURNY, Vlce-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 
E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 
A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 
G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch 
W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 
O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

E. A. CHR1STENSON L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys 



Ni Ison, Jerome 
Nelson, Nils E. 
Nelson, Steve 

11, C. -302 
Nelson, C. R. 
Nesson, Ralph 

mi. II. 4123 
., Thomas 

Newton, A. 

son, Phillip 
Niklasson, Justus 
Nils. mi, Martin L. 
Nilsson, Emil 
Nilsson, Edward 
Nielsen, Jens 
Nilsfn, Hans L. 
Nilsson, John 
Nilsson. K. L 
Nolen, 

Nord. Clarence W. 
Nordquist, Otto 

torn, Hans 
Nordenberg, Alf. 

i en, Ragnar 
Nordlund, Albert 
North, Jesse I 



Bampson, Carl 

Samueison, E. -2888 
Samuelson, Mentor 
Banders, < >scar 
Saline, Rudolf 
Sanjer, Sajer 
Saunders, Dewey A. 
S. anion, David P. 
Bchmees, Herman 

■ ■-it. B. H. 
svlmeldau, Heinrlch 
Schreff, Paul 
Sederholm, J. R. 
Seiffert, John 
Selvert, a inert 
SelenskI, Frank 
Sexton, Harry J. 
-8lKSiems, Lewis 
Sigrlst, George 
Simpson, Joseph H. 
Sinnes. K. E. 
Skogman, W. 
SJoberg, Silas 
Skaar, Oskar M. 
Slattery, Harry 
Small, E. R. 



Nummelin, Arthur Smedsvig. O. B 



San Francisco Letter List 

Members whose man Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manager, The 
Seamen's Journal, 69 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Adolfsson, John DeMario, Thos. 

Allison. Benlamin Demorest, C. E. 
Almon, L. Delaney, G. 

Altonen, Carl Dell, E. O. 

Andersen, O. -2099 DeMar, Tho. 
Andersen, Chas. Dietz, Arnold 

Theo. 
Andersen, N. F. 
Andersen, S. P. 
Andreasen, H. 

1477 



Andersen, H. 
Anderson, A. G. 

-2440 
Anderson, Frank 
Anderson, Ingmar 
Anderson, Johan 
Andersson, C. -2001 Dushane, Matt 
Andersson, G. A. 



Dittman, Rudolf 
Domke, Willi 
Donnelly, George F. 
Drange, F. 8. 
Drennen, W. N. 
Dommelen, G. J. 
Dreyer, Jack O. 
Duarte, John 
Duis, John 
Dumas, C. 
Dunwoody, G. 



Andersson, G. S. 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, Julius 
Andersson, O. L, 

-1363 
Andersson, C. 

-797 
Arneson, Aug. 
Aso, Gustav 



Eaton, Lawrence 
Eckleberry, H. 
Eide, B. 
Elde, W. 
Ekeland, I. 
Eklof 

Ellingsen, Harold 
Ellis, P. L. 
Endemann, M. 



Attaberry, ClarenceEnnus, Plto 



Augustln, H. 
Aylward, Ja 



Erlandson, K. B. 
Even, Frank 
Evensen, Andrew 



Backe, C. V. 

Baggs, H. L. Fagerberg, Ivan 

Baggs, Morris Fagerly, O. 

Bandel, Curt Farevoog, C. M. 

Bang, Oscar Farrell, Bernand 

Baptists, Lawr. Fellman, Geo. E. 

Baris, N. Pick, Max 

Barlow, R. Fjellman, George 

Behni, W. A. Fletcher, Jos. 

Bendlxen, Hans Freese, Paul 

Bergstrom, G. A. Fredrieksen, O. 

Beschorner, Robert Fredricksson, I". O. 

Bews, James Frost, Peter 

BJorklund, Gotfrid Fuller, Geo. E. 



Blair, Frances 
Block, Paul 
Blomgren, C. A. 
Blomgreen, A. 
Bloom, Pete 
Boerner, P. F. 
Borgeson, Hildlng 
Botsford, R. D. 
Boyland, O. J. 
Bratt, A. W. 
Brander, Wm. 
Brauner, C. A.. 
Broman, Karl 
Broomhead. R. 
Broshear, A. O. 
Brown, H. W. 
liryning, Wm. 
Brynlng, Walter 
Buckner, Chas. 
Burgraff, Alb. 
Burke, Gunnar 

Callahan, Patrick 
Carlsen, Sverre 
Carlson, August 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Carlson, John 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, G. -776 



W. 



Ganser, Joe 
Gardell, Joe 
Gardes, F. J. 
Germenis, Socrates 
Gonzales, O. J. 
Graham, Ray 
Gralnge, Arnold 
Graham, Thos. 
Grady, Will. A. 
Granberg, Fred 
Gregory, M. N. 
Green, Lawrence 
Griffin, J. R. 
Grinfelt, Geo. 
Gunderson, H. T. 
Gutmann, Paul C. 
M -11M 

Hagemeyer, Gus 
Haeen. Horace 
Haider. Henry 
Hale. Klngsley 
Hallit. Frank 
Halvorsen, Erling 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Hammond. Rohprt 
Hangprs, H. -1980 
Handley, Chas. 



Carlson, Magnus P. Hansen, Antonlus 
Carlson, O. -1839 Hansen, Hans M. 

Carlson, Peter Hansen, H. O. 

Carlsson. J. Hansen, H. F. 

Carisson. ,'nhn -«61 Hansen, Knud 
Carpenter, Harold 
Cavanaugh. H. K. 
Chaplin. Eddie J. 
Chllcott, Geo. 
Christensen, C. D. 

-1042 
Christian, Jim 
Christen, Bruno 
Christensen, Jorgen Harvey, Earl S. 

-1731 Haunt. C. 

Christensen. Martin Hein, M. 
Clarke, Matthew Heis, G. L 



Hansen, S. P. 
Hansen. Carl 
Hanschman. Wm. 
Hanson, Olaf 
Harbst, J. D. 
Hartwig, Walter 
Harris. T. L. 



Clausen, Louis 
Clever, Hugo 
Clug, Fredrick 
Cobb, Ralph H. 
Colman. J. 
Conley, Irwin 
Cooper, C. E. 
Coulyou, Joseph 
Culman, P. 

Dahls, Ogden 
Dahlgren, Wm. 
Davis. Warren 
DeGuire, Ray 



Heis. J. S. 
Heldal, Trygve 
Helden, H. van 
Hessln, B. 
Heaps, James 
Ilereld. J. M. 
Hplllkson. H. 
Heyen. Horace 
Hpvwood. D. L. 
Hobbs, Frank A. 
Hobbs. Frank M. 
Hoffman, Ferdinand 
Hoglander. Martin 
Homminell, Geo. 



Hollkamp, C. 
Holbrook, G. A. 
Holdaway, C. G. 
Hood, Alex 
Huberts. Emll 
Muter, Chas. 



Knutsen, B. R. 

Knuttson, Rudolf 
Kolustow, A. 
Koolstram, Sam 
Kraal, J. 
Krausem, Wm. 



Huber, C. L. -2846 Krlstofferson. A. B. 



Hunter, Ernest 
Huggins, P. A. 
Hughs, Tom 

It. sen, Christian 
Ireland, H. 
[sakson, Karl 

Jacklin, Charles 
Jacobsen, E. Til. 



Kron, A. H. 
Kruse, Einar 
Kuron, Hemming 

Laine, Arthur A. 
Laine, Kasper 
LaMadrid, B. 

Lange, Henry 
Langmann, Wm. 
Lanphear, D. 



Jacobsen, Herman Uarsen. Lambert 
Jahnke, i'aul Larsen. Slgiuid 



Larsen, G. -2297 
Larsen, John -2012 
Larsen, G. B. 
Lars son, L. H. 
Larrsson, Jack 
Lau, Gustav 
Leegaard, Rasmus 
Lefter, John A. 
Lehtonen, Hj. O. 
Lema, Angel 
Leskinen, F. A. 
Lewis. Albert M. 
Llesen, W. 
land. C. 
7qc Lindegrantz, 

Lindquist, Chas. S. 
Lindroos, Fred 
Locke. James E. 



Jahnke, Richard 
Jakullis, John 
Jansson, A. L. 
Jansson, Fred. 
Janson, John A. 
Jansson, HJ. 
Jansson, John 
Jarvinen, Johan 
Jenni, Jack A. 
Jens, Otto 
Jensen, E. -1987 
Jensen, Chas. Chr. 
Jenson, Jens 
Jensen, Klaus 
Jensen, A. J. 
Jensen, Pete 
Jespersen, M. 

.ioha,!i' 1S cm; Carsten Ji f L w ! nd % Nlckolas 
Johansen. Ellert \'°l e ™ n '- B &- 

Johansen F. -880 ^ohne Edw ', 
Johannesen. Johan-ftJ^ R^ 

JohtSneSinf if^jS^p'""'* *■ 

Johnsen, H. -2213 t^aenen. Peder 
Johanson, E. -2715 
Johanson, II. Maalo, Rasmus 

Johansson, Gustav MacLeod, Norman 
Johnson. A. EmU Makares, S. J. 
Johnson. Carl -2i83 Mannonen. Niels 
Johnson. Edw. Mandmetz, Michael 

Johnson. E. L. Manzano, Luis 

Johansson. Bernad Marker. Andrew 
Johnson, Walter Marshall, Ira 
Jonsson. J. H. -2951 Martinsen i nKVaM 
Jorgensen, Johannes Mattos, Mario P. 
Jorgensen, b. Mahaffey, Cecil 

Josephson. Ben Mathlsen, Mans 

Joyce, Daniel Mattson, Hllding 

Judd, Jack Mattson, Victor 

Jungstrom, William McCoy, J. L. -2904 
Juniper, Foster P. McEvoy, Peter 

, _, McCallum, Chas. 

Kaaveland, T. McClintic, Frost 

Kaernbach, Hugo McCarthy, Harood 
Kalllo, F\ McManus, Peter 

g a !H°- £iank Melander, GustaX 

Kalllo, F. A. Meyers, J. E. 

Karlson, <;. A. -lino Midgette, F^ank W. 
Karlsson, E. -1739 Mikelsen, Bern. 
Miller. R. E. 
Millert. Carl 
Moberg, Alf. 
Mol. J. W. 
Moller, Fritz 
Moonan, Thomas 
Moritz, W. 
Morris. Francis 
Moore, H. L. 
Morris, Jimmie 
Morrison, Donald 
Moulas, Nicholas 
Murray, E. J. 



Karlsson, Gustaf 
Kasperson, E. 
Keinast, Mike 
Kenansky. Adam 
Keller, Wm. 
Kierne, G. H. 
Kihlman, Gunnar 
Klne, Conrad 
King, Allan 
Kinnie, E. J. 
Kirby, Geo. 
Klanke, Kenneth 
Klemmetsen, Alf. 
Klemmensen, Eddy 
Klimon, Otto 
Kluge, Martin 



Nannestad, Arthur 
Nelson, A. B. 



Nuter, Alex 

Oad, John 

a, Larry 
I ihlsson, Hj. 
Ugren, V. E. 
i I'Leary. Patrie 
' ilseii. Fred 
i risen, Magnus 
i ilsen, Ole 
Olsen, Svedrup B. 

Wm. J. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen, C. -1412 
i ilsen, Eugene 
I ilson, Harald 
Olson, Ed. 
Onno, Tobias 
Ostlund. John 
Osborne, E. T. 
Osborne, James 
ijzolin, Jan 
Page, J. N. 
Paksis, T. 
Parker, Bert 
Parrlsh, Arthur L. 

on, Edw. 
en, Lewis 
Pedersen, L. M. 

on, Albert 
Permin, Jans 
Petersen, Axel L. 
Petersen, Bjarne A. 

sen, Jens 
Peterson, Henry 
Peterson, O. -1595 
Pilklnton, Homer 
Post, Albet t 
Potter, E. R. 
Price, Arthur 
Prusch, A. 
Publlcatus, A. 
Punis, Tony 
Ramasse, Joe 
Ramos, Enrique 



Smith, John H. 
Smith, Geo. B. 
Smith, A. G. 
Solberg, Bernt P. 
Soneson, Wilhelm 
Sorensen, Jorgen II. 
Sovdsnes, O. Peter- 
sen 
Spence, O. L. 
Stanford, Harry 
Steinberg, John 
Stensland, Paul 
Stone, Mervyn 
Stout, R. E. 
Stragseth, Svend 
Strurh, O. 
Stang, A. 
Sienensen. A. 
Stewart, William 
Stone, Wlcktor 
Strandberg, O. 
Svengard, J. 
Bwlnka, Albert 

Tacie, John 
Tallaksen, Arthur 
Tandberg, Einar 
Takkis, John 
Taylor, Sam C. 
Tpllefson. Emll 
Thomas, Johnle 
Thomas, Nelson 
Thomasen, Olaf 
Thompson. Clifford 
Thomsen, Chr. 
Thorn. Arvid 
Thomas, Frank 
Thomas, Fred 
Thomphson, James 
Thompson. J. W. 
Tillman, Chas. 
Tlmmers, H. P. 
Tingstrom, A. R. 
Tjersland, Sverre 
Tohtz, R. C. 
Torson, Andrew 



Kasmusen, Rudolpf Touzel, R. 

i: isiuussen, Aksel Trykln, Gustaf 

Itasmusseii, Emil Tucker, Harold J. 

Rasmuasen, Karl V. Tufty, C. J. 

l.uois Turner, W. A. 

I -on, Edwin 
RiUukka, John 



Rier, E. W. 

, Thos. G. 
Rollo, R. 
Rommel, Andrew 
Ronn, E. 
Rose, J. 
Ross, H. E. 



Vargas. Martina 
Vlerr. W. 
Vitek, Edward 
Vltol, A. 
Wapper. John 
Ware, T. F. 
Waterman, J. K. 
Weber, C. W. 



Rosenberg, L. F. K.yvest, 'Frank 



Roth, M. 
Kubins, Ch. 
Rutter, Amandus 
Ryan. Patrick 
Saarinen. K. 
oft, John 



Whitesel. C. W. 
Wilks, J. 
Wlllmann. Wm. 
Wink. Peter 
Wlttenburg. D. 
Woods, Dick 



Allison, Ben 
Barlow. Robt. 
Blake, L. 
Booshard. H. 
Breeze, J. 
Churman, W. C. 
Corneliusen. M. 
Deu Pree, E. 

Kads. Joe 

John 
Angstrom, Edw. 
Frizzell. Riley 
Frey, Peter 
Ganser, Joe 
i ;.u rick, J. B. 
Goodman, Tony 
Griffin, J. R. 
Halvorsen. Jsak 
Henrikson, Ernst 
Hobbs. Frank A. 
Hogl mdcr. M. 
Holmes, Geo. 
Jansonu, C. J. W. 
Johnson, John 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 



PACKAGES 

I. a Mad rid. Rafael 
Larsen, J. -2012 
Larson, Axel 
Lehto, Oscar 
Liljedal. L. 
I.indgren, E. 
Locke, J. E. 
Lundquist, Ralph 
Malmin, T. 
Mathls, Hartley H. 
McPherson, R. 
Mortensen, K. A. 
Mortensen. Bjarne 
Navarrete. Joe 
Newman, L. O. 
Nordlund, Albert 
Pattersen, Frank 
Pedersen, Anders 
Sorensen, Jos. E. 
Sternica, Carl 
Stranberg, P. 
TlUsten, Jack 
Travers 

van Vleet, F. B. 
Wahtje. W. H. 
Wsllin. V. O. 



Kallio, F. 

Kalning, P. G. -134 2 Williams, J. D 

Ketelsen, Fred 




FRANK M. NESTROY 

Phone Kearny 5361 THE ARGONAUT TAILORS UNION TAILOR 

We do Master Tailoring on Suits, Overcoats and Uni- 
forms for men who desire to dress and look superior. 
We carry the largest selection of imported and do- 
mestic woolens. Quality and workmanship guaranteed. 
MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 

268 MARKET STREET 

Conducted by Capt. Chas. Ehlers 

Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

300 Rooms at 50 cents per day, 
$2.50 to $3.00 per week, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL, LUNDGRBN. Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 

THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



— Phones — 

Office, Fkln 7756 Residence, Rand 27 

Office Hours, 9:30 a. m. to 6 p. m. and 

7 to 8 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9:30 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

Liberty Bonds accepted in exchange for 

dental work 

2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Golden Gate 

and Taylor Streets, San Francisco 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 
Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



19 East Street, Foot of Ferry Bridge 

Wholesale— O U T F I TT E R— Retail 

Everything for the man that goes to sea 

SEAMEN AND FISHERMEN 

GEO. A. PRICE 



u. s. 

Seu. Boots 



IS RIGHT 

Navy 
Flannels 



Tower's 
Oil Skins 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall 


Bros. 


Express 


Stand 


and Baggage Room 




— at — 




212 EAST ST., San 


Francisco 


Phone Douglas 


5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

7S3 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 

MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5 

UNIFORMS & SUITS, TO ORDER & READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 

36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



SAVE MONEY ON YOUR SHOES 

Would you walk one-half block from Market Street to 

Save $1 to $3? 

We are located at 58 Third 
St., San Francisco. 

We are agents for — 

W. L. Douglas 
Just Wright 
Walk Ease 
Strong & Garfield 

We can positively save 
you money by buying 
your SHOES from us. 

Our low rent and small 
expense make it possible 
for us to sell cheaper 
than the Market Street 
stores paying six times 
our rent, 
and large stock of men's 




We 
shoes. 



are showing a most exclusive 

We can fit any foot and suit any fancy. 



PRICE'S 



58 THIRD STREET 

Between Market and Mission 

San Francisco, Cal. 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 1804) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. T. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY Is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




JACOB PETERSEN * 
Proprietor* 

Established 1880 



SON 



ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCItCO 



jLMf\ir rnc See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
1V1 \J IV Ei lx 3 box in which you are served. 



ffiaw5^aEasiE^HKas$Ka aK3* st pt. ibso /v_ >\^j»%_ . 

Issued by Authority oFthe Cigar Makers' International Union of 

Union-made Cigars. 

2hl? Gtfl1 rflf* lint U» Cn«» wmuined mthit bra luw two nf by • I IGtlto JTOW» 

1 iMWttnoflHtOCMIUMn'lltUltlUIIOIUlUlllONc* Amiia. >n wjjnmt«» Ocvotee rutin 10- 
I »M«ilitntlirtlitM0(Wt>O(tlJI*UnillNTUUaiULWUIARt0r'nifllU/l Iterates OTiWWnt*! 
I U»J4 OiQjri to ill s«*m throughout tht kmcM 
' MMMIwmUuim tba tabti ml! b« purwlnd auatdmt tolMt. 

Q. }K @U4Un4, hrsidertl, 
V CM I V-, 



tfAmwict 



lUJCAt 



%K*'i. L<«", •:**'•< *">■ .•.•••*-. ''*!* .•'■•*"■ '■'■^■:. 



News from Abroad 



Advices from La Paz, Bolivia, say 
Great Britain has recognized the 
new Bolivian Government. 

A preliminary peace treaty has 
been concluded between the Russian 
Soviet Government and Armenia. 

British and American associations 
of Peking have presented a resolu- 
tion to British Minister Eliot oppos- 
ing renewal of the Anglo-Japanese 
alliance. 

Prohibition is not making great 
headway in Sweden, judging from 
figures of membership of the various 
temperance organizations, which 
show that the organizations and so- 
cieties lost last year over 10 per 
cent, of their members. 

Spanish custom officials are in- 
structed by an order issued by the 
Ministry of Finance to take posses- 
sion of flour mills, which the Gov- 
ernment will in future control, in or- 
der that flour may be properly dis- 
tributed. 

An agreement has been reached 
between the Prague, Belgrade and 
Bucharest governments, called the 
"little entente," for the self-protec- 
tion of Czecho-Slovakia, Serbia and 
Rumania against Russia or enemies 
in the Balkans, according to the 
Giornale d'ltalia. 

Twelve million children in Europe 
lost one or both parents during the 
war, it is shown by compilations 
gathered by the representatives of 
the American Red Cross in eighteen 
countries. Russia leads with 4,000,- 
000, Germany follows with 3,000,000, 
and France has 1,000,000. 

Oil has been struck by the Im- 
perial Oil Company just within the 
Arctic circle, north of the Great 
Slave lake, and close to the Macken- 
zie river, according to an announce- 
ment. The flow is small, about ten 
barrels a day, and possibly cannot 
be made use of economically. 

President Irigoyen has instructed 
Dr. T. A. I.e Breton, Argentine Am- 
bassador at Washington, to sign the 
reciprocal treaty relative to commer- 
cial travelers recently agreed on 
between the United States and Ar- 
gentina. Salesmen of alcoholic bev- 
erages are excluded from the pro- 
vision of the pact. 

As a result of the shortage of fuel 
in French Guiana, arrangements are 
being made for two freight-carrying 
aeroplanes to travel fortnightly be- 
tween the above-named colony and 
British Guiana to transport certain 
supplies to Cayenne; to obviate the 
necessity of depending entirely on 
steamer services. 

The total losses in killed and 
missing suffered by the German 
army and navy in the great war 
were set recently for the first time 
at 2,243,364, in an announcement of 
semi-official nature. Of this number 
500,000 men were termed "missing 
and most likely dead." Fatalities 
in the army were said to number 
1,718,608 and in the navy 24,756. 

Newfoundland is demanding better 
steamship facilities for transatlantic 
trade than are available at present. 
Before the war Newfoundland was 
served by both the Allan and Fur- 
ness Lines, but the Allan line — which 
has been absorbed by the Canadian 
Pacific — no longer calls at New- 
foundland, while the Furness Line 
service is limited to the SS. "Digby" 
and "Sachem," the latter a somewhat 
old boat. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



"Does Cholly live on the aver 
"No, Chollj lives on his father, 
lives on the avenue." — New 
Globe. 

Doctor — And has your husband had 
any lucid intervals, Mrs. Smith" 

Mrs. Smith- 'Es 'ad notliin' ex- 
cept what you ordered him, doctor. — 
Tit-Bits. 



"Look here, sir," exclaimed the 
maiden lady, "1 want you to take 
hack that parrot you -old me. I 
find that it swears very badly." 
'Well, ma'am," replied the dealer, 
"it's a very young bird; it'll learn 
to swear more perfectly when it's a 
bit older."— Stray Stories. 



"This furniture is antiqu< ?" "} es " 
"Did you inherit it?" "In a way. 
-,]■.. grandfather bought it from a 
man on the installment plan, and 1 
took over the payments."— Louisville 
Courier-Journal. 



"Gentleman to see you. tell 

him I'll see him in about half an 

hour." "He says he won't wait a 
minute." "Show him in instantly 
then. lie must he worth seeing." — 
to Blade. 

Daughter— Marry that old Mr. 
Roxley? Why, I'd die first! 

Mother — Nonsense, child! You'd 
outlive him forty years at least. — 
Kansas City Star, 



Pauline — What's that second um- 
pire doing behind the pitcher? 

Paul — Why, he keeps his eye on 
the bases, 

Pauline — Oh, I see — and when he 
isn't looking the players try to steal 
the bases Buffalo Express. 



Young Wife (in the country) — 
1 In- is a nice place you've brought 
me to. We've been here for four 
months and I haven't seen a new 

Hull Xo new face' Why, my 
dear, we've changed our help eight 
times. — Xew York Glohe. 



He If I stole a kiss would you 
scream for your parent 

She — Xo, not unless you wanted 
to kiss the whole family.— Nebraska 
A wgwan. 



I CAN SAVE YOU 

$15 

ON YOUR SUIT 



My place is located on a 
side street, hence my 
expenses are practically 
nothing compared to big 
houses on main thorough- 
fares. 



TOM WILLIAMS 

THE UNION TAILOR 

28 SACRAMENTO ST. 



You get the same claps 
of Service. Woolen trim- 
mings and excellent 
Workmanship. The Style, 
Quality and Fit I guar- 
antee. 

Is the amount not worth saving? 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS DLL) AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HKN'KV TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 

>! Navigation. 

Tic 'lass of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
dge of Navigation, ami Navigation 
<inly. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
with 'higher attainments than one 
Who l). is only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 

There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the Si 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well Informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 

500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

Hezzanith's, Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus, 
Dividers, Nautical Bcoks, Charts and Tide Tables. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 

1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 
We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Diamonds 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postofflce 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 




The One Price Jewelry Store. Everything Marked In 
Plain Figures 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

Attractive Platinum or Gold Mountings with 

Exquisite Diamonds 

WEDDING RINGS 

Hand Carved in Platinum, White Gold, Green 

Gold and the Old Style Plain Gold in 12 

DIFFERENT STYLES and all sizes 

WEDDING GIFTS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

715 MARKET ST., Above Third SAN FRANCISCO 

QamesJISorensqa JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

«ESt-«**M»4 Store Open: 8:30 A. M. to 6:00 P. M., Saturday Included 





Market ai Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

^t 3rd and Townsend San Franclscc 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want your Panama I 
I I'll d" that 

You'll And me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

133 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 1660 



CJUfiBusiEU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ARGONAUT Sltt 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization 



VOL. XXXIV, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1920. 



Whole No. 1719. 



A TEN THOUSAND DOLLAR VERDICT 

Seamen Entitled to "Proper Medical Attention" 



In damage suits against vessels injured 
or incapacitated American seamen usually 
find themselves on the losing side. At 
any rate, it is but very seldom that 
amounts are awarded in any degree com- 
mensurate with the suffering and the na- 
ture of the injury sustained. 

With considerable pleasure the Journal 
therefore submits herewith the court rec- 
ord of an exceptional case. In this in- 
stance a poor, friendless Porto Rican 
messman, not even able to clearly express 
himself in the English language, was 
awarded $10,000 because of the ship's fail- 
ure to furnish that "proper medical atten- 
tion" to which each member of the crew 
is entitled. Of course, considering the 
fact that this man practically lost the use 
of his right hand, the amount in question 
can scarcely be called excessive. It is 
merely unusual. 



MAISONETT vs. MUNSON S. S. T.TNE 
Charge to the Jury 

The Court (Grubb, J.) — Gentlemen of the 
jury, the plaintiff originally had four different 
causes of action which he presented in his 
written complaint, hut the case under the evi- 
dence, as 1 see it. lias been reduced to that 
presented by one cause of action, and probably 
it would be well for me to eliminate the other 
three, so as to make it clear in your mind as 
to what the plaintiff's cause of action is. al- 
though T have no doubt that it is clear. 

One of the causes of action, the first, was 
that the ship was rendered unseaworthy be- 
cause it had no bin for the storage of potatoes. 
I have construed that as a matter of law that 
it did not make the ship unseaworthy, as to 
this plaintiff. 

As 1 understand it, the potato bin was rather 
for convenience than for the safety of the sea- 
men, and therefore its absence, as I see it, 
could not be said to make the ship unseaworthy 
or unsafe as to the seamen or cooks, so that 
cause of action is eliminated from your con- 
sideration, and the fact that he hurt himself 
by scraping his finger with a nail would not 
entitled him to recover in this case, if that was 
all there was to it. 

Another cause of action was that the ship 
had no doctor. That is, that the ship did not 
carry a doctor on it. The law prescribes that 
all ships that carry passengers other than cabin 
passengers, in excess of fifty, must have a doc- 
tor on the ship, but the evidence in this case, 
without conflict, and the plaintiff concedes it, 
did not show that there were fifty or more pas 
sengers other than cabin passengers on this 
trip, and therefore, the law did not apply to this 
particular trip of this ship, and the fact that the 



ship had no doctor would not entitle the plain- 
tiff to recover damages in this case, so that 
cause of action is also eliminated from your 
consideration. 

The third cause of action was one for the 
expenses of the plaintiff's maintenance from 
the time he was hurt up to the time he was 
cured, or such part of it as the ship did not 
furnish him, and also for his hospital and doc- 
tor's expenses if he had had any, and for his 
wages up to the time he was cured. 

It is conceded that he received his vanes 
during the time the rule allowed him, and he 
received them on account of his injury, and 
also that his hospital bills were paid by the 
shipping company, or at least not by him. and 
that he incurred no liability for hospital bills, 
ami there is no evidence sufficiently definite to 
entitle him to his maintenance and up to the 
time of his cure, so I instruct you there is no 
cause of action made out based on the expenses 
and maintenance — that is, of his keep, while 
he was disabled, so that the last cause of ac- 
tion is also eliminated from the case. 

Now, those three are eliminated, and just one 
is left, the one T am going to state, and it is 
based on the idea of the obligation of the ship 
to furnish an injured man, no matter how he 
was injured, with proper surgical or medical 
attention while he was on board the ship. 

In other words, in this case the cause of 
action is alleged to be that the defendant or 
the ship failed to furnish the plaintiff proper 
surgical or medical attention for this scratch 
which he received while he was taking potatoes 
out of the barrel, and the law is that if the ship 
negligently failed to furnish him proper med- 
ical or surgical attention for an injury received 
while on board the ship, and while one of the 
crew, and his injury was aggravated by the fact, 
that he would be entitled to recover damages 
for that aggravation to his injury. 

You see that cause of action would present 
these questions of fact which you must con- 
sider, under the evidence in this case, and re- 
solve in favor of the plaintiff if you find for 
the plaintiff. 

The burden is on the plaintiff to reasonably 
satisfy you that his cause of action is made out 
as he alleges it, and that requires him to rea- 
sonably satisfy you from the evidence of the 
different propositions that are necessary to 
prove his cause of action. 

This last cause of action that I will not men- 
tion is, namely, the alleged negligence to fur- 
nish proper surgical or medical attention to the 
plaintiff after he was injured, and the fust 
proposition on that would be that he would 
have to reasonably satisfy you that he did not 
get the medical attention or treatment which 
be needed, other than that which he received 
while on the voyage from Antilles to New 
York and thereafter. 

In the second place, he would have to rea- 
sonably satisfy you on the evidence that the 
ship or the captain or the chief steward bad 
notice that the plaintiff needed medical atten- 
tion other than that which was in fact fur- 
nished to him on the voyage, and in the third 
place, the evidence would have to reasonably 



satisfy you that the ship or the captain or the 
chief steward received that intimation as to the 
plaintiff's need for further medical attention 
other than the ship could afford him, while 
there was a reasonable opportunity to get such 
medical attention for him, and while he was 
still suffering from the injury, and whether they 
gave him the medical attention he required, if 
he did require any other, than that which they 
gave him, and in the last place, that the de- 
fendant failed to furnish him with that medical 
attention which it had notice of, and that the 
plaintiff's injury was aggravated by that failure. 

Those are the propositions you are to re- 
solve, in favor of the plaintiff in order to en- 
title the plaintiff to damages in this case; also 
that the defendant had notice of the plaintiff's 
need for that medical attention, and that he 
failed to get it, and that that failure aggravated 
the plaintiff's injury. 

The plaintiff's injuries consisted of a scratch 
on the back of his hand, which of course would 
be inconsequential if there was no danger of 
infection. That is, it concededly would have 
required no medical attention but for the dan- 
ger of infection, caused by the fact that the 
scratch was caused by a rusty nail, and we all 
know that that would require some medical 
treatment to avoid the danger of infection, and 
the question would be whether he got the treat- 
ment that a reasonably prudent person would 
have furnished him for such an injury. 

He did receive medical treatment on the ship, 
not from the doctor, but from the chief stew- 
ard, as you all heard. There is no dispute 
about that. He says so, and the steward says 
so, and there seems to be little dispute about 
the character of the medical attention that was 
furnished him. 

The steward says he gave him a bichloride 
tablet to dissolve, and told him to bathe his 
hand in that solution, and to paint his hand 
with iodine, and bandage it up, and that is what 
I understand, in effect, the plaintiff himself said 
the chief steward did. 

The plaintiff produced Dr. Hammell, and 
asked him what was the proper medical treat- 
ment for such an injury. That is, a scratch that 
was caused by a rusty nail, and he said that his 
treatment would have been to have bathed it in 
carbolic acid, and I think in alcohol, and that 
if he knew the nail was rusty he would have 
injected tetanus virus, so as to inoculate him 
against lockjaw. 

It would be for you to say, taking all the 
testimony in the case, whether you believe the 
plaintiff received from the ship the kind of 
medical treatment that would have been suffi- 
cient in the eyes of a reasonably prudent per- 
son, for the character of injury that he re- 
ceived, and that he showed to the chief stew- 
ard of the ship when he submitted bis hand 
for treatment. 

If you believe the treatment was proper and 
sufficient that he did receive, then he has no 
complaint, because whether he got a doctor or 
not, because if he was receiving the kind of 
treatment that was suitable and proper, or that 
a reasonably prudent person would have con- 
sidered proper for the injury which he received. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



and that en bj one other than ,i doc- 

tor, that would make no difference, if the treat- 
ment was proper, that would be all he 
titled to, and therefore he would have no cause 
of action. 

If on the other hand you believe that, con- 
sidering the character and nature of his injury, 
and the cause of his injury, and the knowledge 
that the ship had or should have had of the 
character and cause of his injury, additional 
treatment was necessary in order to furnish a 
proper security against an infection or against 
an aggravation of his injury from lack of treat- 
ment, and if you believe that that treatment 
that was furnished by the chief steward was 
not the proper treatment, then of course there 
would have been a failure to furnish him with 
the proper medical attention that the ship was 
obligated to do, and in that case you would 
have to inquire further to see whether the 
plaintiff had a cause of action. 

Of course, as I have said to you, if the treat- 
ment given him was proper, for an injury such 
as he had, and if yon find that the treatment 
accorded to him by the chief steward was such 
as a reasonably prudent person would have 
furnished him under all the circumstances, by a 
person skilled in those matters, then he has no 
complaint, because even though that treatment 
was not furnished by a doctor, if it was the 
right kind of treatmnet, he has no complaint 
and cannot recover. 

Tf it was not the proper kind of treatment 
that a reasonably prudent person, skilled in 
such matters would have Riven him, if the 
treatment given him was not that which would 
have been furnished by a reasonably prudent 
pers,, ii, you would have to inquire further, be- 
cause in" that case he might have a cause "i 
action, for the neglect to furnish him proper 
treatment, and your next inquiry would be 
whether the ship or its authorized officers and 
the chief steward would be authorized to act 
for the ship in this matter and had notice of 
the injury, and of his need for additional treat- 
ment in addition to the treatment which the 
chief steward himself furnished. 

I do not think it would be necessary that the 
plaintiff should call on the chief steward for 
a doctor. If the chief steward examined his 
hand, and as a reasonably prudent person, after 
making such an examination, might have un- 
derstood or believed that a doctor was neces- 
sary for the seaman's safety, then it would not 
he necessary that the seaman should call on or 
ask the chief steward for a doctor and the ob- 
ligation to furnish medical service would arise 
in the absence of any request, if the injury 
was so presented to the steward, that a rea- 
sonably prudent person, who was skilled in the 
matter of medical treatment would have con- 
sidered that a doctor was necessary, and that 
treatment such as a layman could give was 
not sufficient and it would be for you to say 
as a question of fact, what notice was given, 
and when it was given. 

That is, notice not only of the state of the 
injury, but of the need of additional treatment 
for that injury, additional to that which the 
chief steward himself could have given. 

Now of course, that notice would have to 
have been received while there was yet time 
and opportunity for the ship or the duly au- 
thorized officers of the ship to have procured 
that medical attention for the plaintiff. 

There is evidence tending to show, as I recol- 
lect, that the notice of the injury was ^iven 
either to the chief cook or to the chief steward. 
It is conceded that the notice was given Fri- 
day, to the chief steward, that iie was injured, 
and that his hand was exhibited to the chief 
steward, and that was before the ship left 
Antilles. 

It would be for you to say whether the char- 
acter of the plaintiff's injury at the time he ex- 
hibited it to the chief steward was such as to 
put the chief steward on notice that the man 
ought to have a doctor, and that the chief stew- 
ard, with his layman's remedies, would be in- 
sufficient to protect the safety of the plaintiff 
against infection. 

If you believe that when he exhibited his in- 
jured hand to the chief steward, on Thursday 
or Friday, or whenever it was, or both, if you 
believe that a reasonably prudent man such as 
the chief steward, skilled as the chief steward 
was, or as he should have been, in such mat- 
ters, if you believe that such a man should have 
known that it was not safe for him to continue 
treatment of the hand, but that the man re- 
quired the services of a doctor, then that would 
have been notice to the ship that the plaintiff 
ought to have been furnished with medical at- 
tention. That is, with the services of a doctor. 
There is evidence that there were doctors at 
Antilles, but you would have to find that issue 
as a question of fact, or whether there were no 
doctors there, none could be found. If there 
aere doctors there, he would have had the op- 
portunity at Antilles, if he" had notice of the 
need, and if there was a need, in fact, before it 
left the port of Antilles, and if a doctor could 
have better treated the plaintiff's hand; that is, 
if he could have furnished some remedy that 
the chief steward did not have, or could not 
furnish, and that remedy was necessary, and 
would have availed to save the plaintiff's hand 
from its present condition, that would show- 
that there was neglect on the part of the chief 
steward to perform his obligation from the 
ship in the matter of medical attention. 



1 'f course, it the doctor it Antilles could 
have done no more than the chief steward, then 
there would be no recoverable failure on the 
part of the defendant as to the chief steward 
not procuring the doctor, but if you believe the 
doctor at Antilles could have furnished some 
remedy which the chief steward could not, or if 
you believe that a doctor could better have 
treated the plaintiff's hand, with better results, 
then there would be damage resulting to the 
plaintiff from not being furnished with a 
doctor. 

Of course, it is conceded that there was no 
doctor furnished until the ship arrived in Xew 
York. 

If you find then that the plaintiff needed a 
doctor, or needed medical attention and serv- 
ices, other than those which the chief steward 
gave him, and if you believe that that need was 
made known to the ship to the chief steward 
at the time when it was possible and reasonable 
for the chief steward or the captain to have 
procured a doctor, and if you believe that the 
failure to do that caused the injury to the 
plaintiff's hand to be aggravated, and in a sub- 
stantial way, other than it would have been if 
he had received proper medical treatment, then 
the plaintiff would have a cause of action for 
such damages as resulted from that failure to 
furnish him medical attention. 

The burden is on the plaintiff to show those 
things, and if he reasonably satisfies you from 
the evidence in this case, as to that, he is en- 
titled to recover damages, and if he fails to 
reasonably satisfy you as to any of them, lie 
cannot recover. 

If lie does recover, if you deem that he is 
entitled to recover, his damage of course is not 
the damage caused by the original injury, the 
scratch, but it is the damage caused by the 
neglect or failure to furnish proper medical 
attention to cure the scratch, and the injury 
that Jie would be entitled to recover for would 
be that aggravation if any which there was in 
the history of his injury, due to the fact that 
he did not get the proper medical attention, 
not the injury itself, but the aggravation of the 
injury, if any there was. due to the fact, if it 
be a fact, that he did not get proper medical 
attention from the ship. 

You have seen the condition of his band at 
the present time, and it will be for vou to 
determine, if you find for the plaintiff, how 
much of that condition is due to a neglect to 
furnish proper medical attention, and to the 
extent that his injury has been aggravated by 
that failure, he would be entitled to compen- 
sation. 

The damage that the law awards in a case 
like this would be measured by what you be- 
u ould be reasonable compensation for the 
aggravated amount of his injury, the reasonable 
compensation to be judged by the evidence in 
the case. 

One of the elements of that compensation 
would be the pain and suffering, both mental 
and physical that were caused to him, or that 
he suffered from, by reason of not having re- 
ceived medical attention, if you believe that to 
be so, that he would not have suffered from, 
had he received proper medical attention: also 
the inconvenience caused him by his crippled 
hand, so far as that inconvenience was brought 
about by the failure to furnish him with proper 
medical attention on the part of the ship. 

He would also be entitled to recover reason- 
able compensation for his diminished earning 
capacity, because of bis injuries, so far if at 
all as that diminished capacitv comes about 
from the aggravation to his injuries that was 
brought about by the failure to furnish him 
with proper medical attention on the ship's part. 
Tf you believe that to be true, that is, if 
you believe he could have earned during the 
period from bis injury up to the present time, 
and in the future — for his injury is permanent, 
apparently though there is some evidence that 
:m apparent loss of motion might be remedied, 
in his present condition, then it would be right 
for you to allow him what would be a reason- 
able comoensation for the diminished earning 
capacity for the time that you believe it will 
remain. Not necessarily the difference in his 
wages, but a sum that would represent what 
his unimpaired earning capacitv would be worth 
to him as compared with his diminished earning 
capacity, or such part of it as is due to any 
failure on the part of the ship to furnish him 
with proper medical attention. 

Those would be the elements of damage, the 
pain and suffering, and the inconvenience of 
being in a crippled condition, and any loss of 
earning capacity that you may believe he suf- 
fered by any neglect to furnish him with proper 
medical attention. 

Mr. Allen— T ask your Honor to charge the 
jury that the ship was not responsible for an 
error of judgment on the part of its officers, if 
their judgment is conscientiously exercised, with 
reference to conditions existing at the time. 

The Court — That is true, gentlemen. Tf there 
was no negligence if the officers of the ship. 
the chief steward in this case, exercised in good 
faith his best judgment, upon conditions as pre- 
sented to him by the plaintiff at the time he 
showed him his hand. 

Mr. Allen — I ask your Honor to charge the 
jury that the defendant, through its agents, 
and servants, administered such care and at- 
tention as was reasonably proper, so far as the 



circumstances of the injuries were concerned. 
and ii the plaintiff's injurii s became aggravated 
because of his removal of the bandage repeat- 
edly thereafter, that if we are liable, we are 
liable only for what he has suffered by way of 
the improper original treatment. 

I he Court — I do not recall any evidence of 
the removal of the bandage myself. 

Mr. Allen— Mr. McLain said he went to him 
a number of times, and took the bandage off. 

I'he Court — Tf you find that to be true I will 
allow it. 

Mr. Axtell — I do not recall any such evidence. 
I think it is an error to talk about such a 
thing, because there was no substitute provided 
for this man. There was no extra man on the 
ship, and I understood the evidence to be to 
show that he insisted upon trying to do his 
work, long after he should not have 1 
working. 

Mr. Allen— Mr. McLain said that he did re- 
move it a number of times. 

The Court — If the jury finds the fact, you 
can apply the principle of law. If there is no 
such evidence, the principle has no application 
to this case at all. It is only if there is evi- 
dence present that he removed the band 
when he should not have done so. 

Mr. Allen — I ask your Honor to charge the 
jury that the master or steward or any of the 
officers were not required to exercise the skill 
of a doctor or surgeon, but only that of a rea- 
sonably prudent man from the conditions exist- 
ing at the time. 

'I'he Court That is true, gentlemen of the 
jury. 

Mr. Allen — I ask your Honor to charge the 
jury that if there was nothing in the conduct 
or appearance of the plaintiff's hand to give 
warning that there was likely to be infection, 
and if that was the case, if it was not likely 
that there would be serious consequences from 
his injury, that the ship was not liable for tin- 
steward's failure to procure a physician until 
the vessel reached Yew York. 

The Court — That is right. If there was noth- 
ing to indicate the likelihood of infection, there 
would be no use in getting a physician, but 
whether that is true or not. is for you to say 
and not me. 

Mr. Allen — I ask your Honor to charge the 
jury that the question of the condition of the 
man's hand at the time it was exhibited to the 
chief steward, is entirely a question of fact for 
the jury to determine, upon this evidence. 
The Court — Yes 

Mr. Axtell — In view of the fact that the 
Court has eliminated cause of action Xo. 1, I 
move to amend cause of action Xo. 2 as com- 
pared to damages, in the sum of $25,000.00, and 
there being no cause of action Xo. 3 proven, 
as to maintenance, that will eliminate itself. 
but it was our idea that the case would be 
submitted to the jury, and that they would 
have an opportunity to find for the plaintiff in 
the sum of $25,000.00 on these two causes of 
action. 

The Court — So that on the cause of action 
that is remaining, vou claim the sum of 
$25 .000.00? 

Mr. Axtell — Yes, and I make such a motion, 
if your Honor please. 
The Court — Allowed. 

Mr. Allen — I ask your Honor to charge the 
jury, in view of the statement just made, that 
the fact that the claim is made in the com- 
plaint for a certain sum of money, is no indi- 
cation that the jury should return a verdict in 
that sum. 

I'he Court Xo. it is only what the plaintiff 
claims, luit of course you cannot allow him 
more than he claims. 

Mr. Allen — I wish to except to the amend 
ment at this time. 
The Court — Yes. 
The jury thereupon retired. 

The jury returned and announced a verdict 
in the sum of $10,000.00. 

Mr. Allen — If your Honor please, the defend- 
ant moves that the verdict be set aside, and 
asks for a new trial, on all of the grouiuU 
stated in Section 999 of the Code of Civil Pro- 
cedure, except the ground of insufficient dam- 
ages and upon all the exceptions taken at the 
trial. I think, i ( your Honor please, that I 
should be permitted to submit a memorandum 
on the case. I think the verdict is excessive. 

The Court — I do not think so. He has suf- 
fered the loss of the use of his right hand. 
Motion denied. 

Mr. Allen — Exception. 



That science and modern inventions can 
and will replace cheap labor is becoming 
more and more evident. For examplr. in 
India it costs but 6 cents a day for men 
to wave fans to keep the air circulating in 
houses. Yet. even these men are graduall\ 
being replaced by electric fans as cheaper 
and more reliable. 



The union label constitutes recognition of 
the union by making certain the recogni- 
tion of union products. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Trade Union's Value Seen by Medical Men 

Organized labor is bringing into line 
those employers who cannot see that sod- 
den drudges are not as desirable as workers 
who have leisure for recreation, for study, 
for health, says the New York Medical 
Journal. 

This publication declares that "the duty 
of the scientist is clear." 

"To humanize working conditions, to 
reassert the value of the individual, to 
study all ways of releasing in work the 
best energies of the worker, instead of as 
now, so prodigiously wasting them, this 
should be the practical role of science in 
industry." 

"England was one of the first countries 
to conduct scientific investigations into the 
question of fatigue and hours of work. 
England tried to speed up her munitions 
workers until she discovered that they 
were breaking under the strain; then stud- 
ies of the munitions industry were made, 
with the result that hours of work were 
shortened and both the health and effective- 
ness of the workers were increased. Now 
comes our own public health service with 
a report proving the superiority of the 
eight over the 10-hour day. The findings 
are based on a comparison of an eight 
and a 10-hour plant, each a huge indus- 
trial establishment prominent in the metal 
working industry. Superiority of the eight- 
hour day was proved from the economic 
standpoint— that is, in respect to main- 
tenance of output, lost time, and labor 
turnover. But the eight-hour day was 
also proved more beneficial to the work- 
man, and this in a way that the employer 
could appreciate because it touched his 
pocketbook— it was found to reduce the 
rate of industrial accidents." 



Basic Income Urged for Employing Class 

If it is logical for the Government to 
probe the living necessities of workers and 
set a wage on this basis, why can't this 
system be applied to the employing class, 
asks the Westralian Worker, which de- 
mands the appointment of a basic income 
commission to investigate the needs of 
those outside the working class that their 
incomes may be based accordingly. 

At the present time the intests of the 
workers are "protected" by a basic wage 
commission, arbitration and conciliation 
courts, wages boards and a necessary com- 
modities commission. 

"Here is a list of functional bodies," 
says the Westralian Worker, "which are 
employed ascertaining what it costs the 
worker to live, what minimum (usually 
maximum) wage shall be paid, ascertaining 
what clothing he shall wear, or what he 
may be permitted to eat. The scale of 
wage is thus based upon the barest of 
necessities, and the sequel is the same old 
stor y_ w ith a raise in wages up go prices, 
and incomes of the land, finance and trad- 
ing fraternity reach out for an added per- 
centage at each turn. 

"The day has now arrived when the 
workers should apply the method of ascer- 
taining what is a reasonable basic income. 



"Are stock exchange boodlers, land value 
jugglers, interest money lenders and food 
gamblers to be regarded as above the law? 
Is it for them to arrogate both in the 
matter of what they should pay and what 
they should receive? 

"Labor is, by every rule of logic, en- 
titled to demand a basic income com- 
mission." 



High-Toned Anarchy 

Business interests that are aiding 
the street car company in its attempt 
to smash the Street Car Men's Union are 
exhibiting a brand of high-toned anarchy 
to organized labor of Colorado. The 
employes asked for higher wages and 
the company imported strikebreakers, 
staged riots and lashed the people into 
a frenzy through newspapers it controls. 
Many people have been killed and injured. 

In an effort to break the strike an 
injunction judge ordered officers of the 
Union to call off this movement. The 
officers obeyed, but the men refused to 
return to work and then the officers were 
jailed. The trade union movement is be- 
hind the car men in a fight which revolves 
around higher wages, but which is really 
an attempt by industrial black hands to 
smash Denver trade unionism. 



Holder Reappointed 

The President has reappointed Arthur 
E. Holder as the labor member of the 
Federal Board for Vocational Education. 
The appointment must be acted upon by 
the Senate prior to its next adjournment 
when, if concurred in, the appointment 
will carry for a period of three years, or 
until July, 1923. 

The appointee is a member of the Inter- 
national Association of Machinists, and 
for years served as legislative representa- 
tive of the A. F. of L. 



Vast Sums for War; Starve Efficiency 

In a recent speech Dr. Edward B. Rosa, 
chief physicist of the United States Bureau 
of Standards, showed that statesmen, 
editors and publicists who continually 
shriek efficiency have not protested when 
the last Congress ignored efficiency, edu- 
cation, public health and research in the 
appropriations, which total over $5,000,- 
000,000. 

The scientist shows that 92.8 per cent, 
of the five billion dollars are for expenses 
connected with recent and previous wars 
and for the army and navy. 

But 1 per cent, or a total of $57,093,561 
of the $5,000,000,000, was appropriated for 
governmental research work, for education, 
public health, women's and children's bu- 
reaus, the geological survey, the bureau of 
mines with its life saving and other impor- 
tant activities, for the bureau of standards, 
bureau of fisheries, all activities in agricul- 
ture, bureau of foreign and domestic com- 
merce, vocational education, colleges for 
agriculture and mechanical arts, library of 
Congress and the Smithsonian institution. 
Of the $5,000,000,000, the recent and pre- 
(Continued on page 10) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 
355 North Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South 
Australia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY. 

Internationale Transportarbeiter - Federation. 
Engelufer, 18, Berlin S. O. 16 Germany. 

FRANCE. 

General Federation <les Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads, 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan, F. 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Longgatan 
25. Goteborer. Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade, 15 Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, T,. Strand- 
strade 20, Cobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieinv- 
steeg. Rotterdam. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste. 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S. Marcellino 6-2. Italy. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle In- 
glaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedictinos 18. Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



* 


* 


World's 


Workers 


* 


.> 



The Spanish Socialist party has 
decided 1>> 8000 to 5000 votes ink 
favor of conditional adhesion to the | 
Third International. 

All private enterprises not operat- 
ing upon a purely co-operative basis 
have been closed as the first step 
by Moscow authorities in a vigorous 
fighl against speculation. 

Street car men in Winnipeg, Mani- 
toba, have raised wages 10 per cent 
through a conciliation hoard. The 
il dates hack to May 1 and back 
pay aggregates $70,000. 

\ sweeping Communist victory 
has taken place in the Serbian munic- 
ipal elections, says a report from 
Belgrade. The Communists elected 
a Burgomaster and 30 out of 40 
Councillors. 

Treasurer Gasca of the Mexico 
'n\ Federation of Labor has been 
appointed governor of the federal 
district by President de la lluerta. 
The federal district includes the re- 
public's capital. The appointment to 
this important post was opposed by 
employers mi the ground that "being 
a labor man. Gasca's sympathies 
would always be with the workers." 
The official organ of the Federation 
of Labor replies that the unionist 
"was appointed to that post to see 
that justice is done where justice is 
due, and we are sure that the work- 
ers will he pleased to see that Gov- 
ernor Gasca adheres to that prin- 
ciple.*' 

Plans for a law providing for the 
collaboration of workmen in the 
management of industrial plants in 
Italy, which will he presented at the 
next session of the Italian Parlia- 
ment, have been placed in the hands 
of a commission appointed by So- 
cialist members of tin lb. use of 
Deputies. Unionists declare that oc- 
cupation of plants throughout Italy 
will continue until employers' priv- 
ileges arc suppressed and the new 
rights of labor acknowledged. While 
a majority of employers strongly 
resist the workmen's scheme for as- 
sisting in the work of management, 
there is an important section which 
supports a suggestion that the men's 
scheme be accepted on general lines, 
in order that the conflict going on 
at present may be ended. 

The new British Unemployment 
Insurance Act. which received the 
Koval Assent on August 9, 1920, 
will come into operation on Xovem- 
bcr 8 next. The Act will extend 
compulsory insurance to substan- 
tially all persons for whom Health 
Insurance contributions have now to 
paid, except outworkers and per- 
- employed in agriculture and 
private domestic service. A distinc- 
tion from Health Insurance is that 
workpeople over 70 will be insurable 
except in the case of Old Age 
Pensioners, who are excluded both 
as regards contributions and benefits. 
Tt is anticipated that the Act will 
bring into insurance against unem- 
ployment an additional 8.000,000 per- 
sons, making the total number in- 
sured about 12,(100,1X10 persons, in- 
cluding non-manual workers in re- 
ceipt «,f remuneration not exceeding 
in value £250 a year. It is expected 
that about 8,000,000 will be insured 
under the general scheme, and that 
ultimately about 4,000,000 will come 
under special schemes which may be 
_'et up by industries which contract 
out of the general scheme. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boot? 

See them at M BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529'/ 2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO. CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south. Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under hi*, undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 
Peaceful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
Disputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLLIS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE, General Secretary-Treasurer 




IS INDEPENDENCE 
YOUR GOAL? 

If you spend less than you earn, and save the 
difference, you are on your way to independence. 

WORK AND SAVE 

must be part of the plan — safe investment another 

INVEST YOUR SAVINGS 

in 

GOVERNMENT SAVINGS 
SECURITIES 

PRICES IN JUNE 

Thrift Stamps at Twenty-five Cents 

$ 5 Government Savings Stamps for $ 4.17 

$100 Treasury Savings Certificates for 83.40 

$1000 Treasury Savings Certificates for B34.00 

FOR SALE AT BANKS AND POST OFFICES 

GOVERNMENT LOAN ORGANIZATION 

SECOND FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICT 

120 Broadway - New York 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Will 11. Peterson and G. Johnson, 
formerly winchmen of S. S. "Carmel" 
to communicate with J. T. Smith, 
Room 411, 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 9-8-20. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of the brother of August W. Stras- 
din, will please communicate with 
B. I. LaSelle, 924 Crocker Bldg., 
San Francisco. 9-15-20 



INFORMATION WANTED 

Members of crews of Barge 
"Ohio" and S. S. "Gulfcoast" will 
kindly communicate with this office 
regarding their salvage claims 
against the Standard Oil Barge No. 
1 between Mobile and Port Arthur 
about May 18th. I represent a 
member of the crew and have 
already taken up the matter of a 
salvage award for him. Silas B. 
Axtell. New York, N. Y. 7-14-20 



Navigation School 

License Guaranteed or Fee Refunded. 
Mates' Courses, $55.00 
WRITE FOR CIRCULAR 
Sextants, i"-st 

-'.50; Marine Night G 
from $27.50— Beat Makes. 

CAPTAIN PENNRICH 

36 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Near Borough Hail Sub. Station 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. G. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. «th 8t. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront. Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP"0F COFFEE 
A SQUARE" MEAL 

— Try - 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN. Prep. 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship it is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette la making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them where they belong — on ezeSsl 
profits, war profits and surplus fortune! 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is be_- 
Ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other mpn in public life. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year— Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine, Madison, Wis. 



Honolulu Letter List 



• n. Bert 
Bradley, Ed. 
Buck, Harry 
Caldwell, J< 
Campbell, Ed. 

en, Adolph 
nant. B. c 
Ettersen, Ward 
Hams, Ed. 
.lohnsen, Hilding 
Larsen, John 



Lame, Pat. 
Leison, Will. 
Lind, Gust. 
Matson, Rolf. 
Mulligan, Ed. 
Nlckols, Henry 
Sandel, T. S. 
Stronberg, Pet. 
Stewart, A. J. 
Solberg, B. P. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of George Mace Monroe, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
last heard of at Charleston, S. C, 
March, 1916, will please communi- 
cate with his mother, Mrs. Alice 
Monroe, 918 Spruce street, Seattle, 
Washington. 6-9-20 



TO MY CLIENTS 

Please look over our legal 
reports on file in every 
Union Hall on the coasts 
whenever you are in port. 
Notice of commencement of 
all actions, their appearance 
on the calendar for trial, 
trials, judgments and settle- 
ments effected arc pub! 
in all cases whether fur 
-, salvage or personal 
injury. Law Office, Silas B 
Axtell, 9 State Street, New 
Vork. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine 



The Canadian Pacific Railway is reported 
to have placed an order with the Wallace Ship- 
yards, Victoria, B. C, for a coasting steamer 
of about 330 feet length and 17-knot speed. 

Eleven German sailing vessels still remaining 
at Santa Rosalia have been ordered to North 
Pacific ports to work grain cargoes for the 
United Kingdom, according to information 
from Portland, Ore. 

The "Blaatind" (Nor. m. schr.), built at Se- 
attle in 1919, and owned by the Amerikanake 
Motorskonnert Aktier, Norway, has been sold 
by auction, by order of the U. S. District 
Court, at Seattle, to the Scandinavian-American 
Bank, Seattle, for $100,000. 

The Shipping Board hull "Egeria," 3500 tons, 
which has been tied up in the Portland district, 
has been purchased by northern operators and 
will be converted into a steamer. The "Acar- 
men," another of the hulls recently sold, is to 
be converted into a barkentine. Other sales 
from the fleet include the "Abantis" and "Ab- 
deria," bought by W. L. Haskins of Portland. 

The San Francisco and Portland Steamship 
Company will inaugurate a five-day service be- 
tween San Francisco and Portland beginning 
November 1, it was announced by Frank Shafer, 
manager of the company. This schedule will 
1>e made possible through the charter of the 
Alaska Steamship Company's liner "Alaska," 
which has been plying between Seattle and the 
ports of Southeastern Alaska. 

Dr. W. T. Christensen has been appointed to 
the Seattle Port Commission as its delegate to 
the annual convention of the National Associa- 
tion of Port Authorities to be held in Chicago, 
September 30 and October 1 and 2. The Na- 
tional Association convention will be followed 
by the annual gathering of the Pacific Coast As- 
sociation of Port Authorities, which will be 
held in Seattle this year. It will convene Octo- 
ber 14 for a three-day session. 

Advices received by the United States Ship- 
ping Board from the Hog Island Shipyards 
stated that two of the vessels allocated to the 
Pacific Mail Company had been launched. The 
names of the two vessels are "Empire State" 
and "Golden State." They are two of five 
similar crafts allocated to the company for the 
transpacific passenger carrying trade and the 
above named boats are expected to arrive the 
first of the year. 

Silver sand for use in making bottles and 
glass formed the principal part of the cargo of 
the Norwegian motorship "George Washington" 
of the Norway-Pacific Line, which arrived at 
San Francisco during the week. The shipment 
amounts to 9100 tons, Other items in the 
motorship's manifest are 852 bundles of baskets. 
342 packages of machinery and 400 bales of 
hops. The "George Washington" is discharging 
on the Oakland side under the direction of 
Captain C. F. Klitgaard. 

The new pier now being completed by the 
city of Seattle, which is to be especially fitted 
up as a terminal for ocean-going liners, is de- 
clared by the Port Commissioners to be the 
largest commercial pier in the world. It is 
2,580 feet lono and 367 feet wide, having an 
area of 946,860 square feet, compared with 876,- 
000 square feet for the new municipal pier at 
Chicago, which is not primarily a commercial 
terminal. The structure in Lake Michigan is 
3.000 feet long and 292 feet wide. 

The largest and most complete merchant 
marine cargo training ship in the world, 
the 8800-ton steel steamship "Hollywood" of 
the Recruiting Service of the United States 
Shipping Board, sailed from Seattle recently, 
beginning her maiden voyage. It is to be 
operated on regular schedule as a cargo train- 
ing shin between Seattle and Hawaii and San 
Francisco by the Recruiting Service of the 
United States Shipping Board. Freight for the 
vessel will be furnished by Alexander & Boyle, 
agents for the Matson Navigation Company. 

Advices received by the marine department 
of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
stated that repairs have been begun on the 
schooner "Spokane." The vessel was previously 
reported at having arrived at Sydney in tow, 
after losing her rudder while en route from the 
Australian port to Iquique. The vessel sailed 
from Sydney on July 15 last for the Chilean 
nort. The "Spokane" will not be forced to go 
into drydock for the necesssary repairs, and 
it is expected that she will be able to sail for 
Iquique shortly. 

The trial trip of the transport "St. Mihiel," 
one of twelve vessels constructed at the Hog 
Island shipyards for the acccount of the United 
States Government's transport service, was held 
lasl week. The report showed that the craft 
developed a speed of 16.75 knots on four trial 
runs. Five of these vessels have been allocated 
bv the Government to the transport service out 
of San Francisco for the Transpacific troopship 
service between that port and the Philippines and 
Hawaiian islands. The main dimensions of the 
crafts are: Length, 448 feet; beam, 58 feet; 
draft, loaded. 28 feet. The transports, which 
are all of the same type, arc equipped with 
oOOO-horsepower marine-geared turbine. 



At the St. Helen's Lumber Company in Ore- 
gon, owned by the Charles R. McCormick Com- 
pany of San Francisco, there has been placed 
in operation for the first time in any lumber 
mill of the world the Greenlee timber perforat- 
ing machine, an invention for the preservative 
treatment of wood with creosote. Charles R. 
McCormick, president of the company, returned 
yesterday from St. Helens and stated that after 
viewing the work of the invention it would 
revolutionize the present method of inoculat- 
ing timber with creosote for prevention against 
teredoes and other elements that have created 
havoc with timber in the past. To Edmund M. 
Blake, production engineer for Charles R. Mc- 
Cormick and the St. Helen's Creosoting Com- 
pany, is due credit for perfecting the machine. 

Construction of the two 14,000-ton freighters 
building at the Moore yards for the Matson 
Navigation Company, is progressing rapidly, ac- 
cording to officials of the company. The ves- 
sels are expected to be ready for service by 
the first of the year. The vessels, the "Manu- 
lani" and the "Manu Kai," have been designed 
especially to meet the requirements of the 
Hawaiian trade. Specially designed cargo booms 
and winches for rapid discharge and loading 
are features of the new craft. The vessels 
are equipped with six large cargo hatches, 
six large sliding ports and a similar number 
of small ports. The deck equipment for han- 
dling cargo also will be extensive. Over each 
of the two larger hatches amidship there will 
be a steel boom, with a lifting capacity of 
fifty tons. Each cargo hatch will have two 
winches. 

The Union Steamship Company has made ar- 
rangements for placing the steamer "Maun- 
ganui," 13,500 deadweight tons, in their passen- 
ger and freight carrying service between Well- 
ington, Raratonga, Papeete and San Francisco, 
according to Captain B. M. Aldwell, master of 
the steamer "Marama," now at San Francisco. 
The "Maunganui" during the war served the 
New Zealand Government as a troopship. After 
the war the vessel was placed in the drydock 
at Wellington and completely overhauled. The 
fuel consumption during this period has been 
changed from coal to oil. The company had 
planned to place the vessel in service this 
month, but were prevented by the acute oil 
shortage prevailing in New Zealand ports at 
present. When the Maunganui" is placed in com- 
mission she will be the finest steamer in this 
service, according to Captain Aldwell. Captain 
L. C. H. Worrall, formerly commander of 
the "Marama" has been appointed skipper of 
the "Maunganui." 

For the purpose of insuring safe entrance 
of vessels through the Golden Gate during 
thick fogs submerged cables to act as pilots for 
the crafts may be laid by naval and harbor 
officials, it was stated during the week. The 
device has been successfully tested in New 
York harbor, where vessels are guided in and 
out of that harbor by electrical soundings 
via these cables during unfavorable weather. 
Secretary Daniels has been informed by officers 
in charge of the experiment that a destroyer 
has been steered through Ambrose channel in 
thick weather by means of the submerged 
cable stretched for a distance of sixteen miles 
in the harbor of New York. Protection is 
afforded the cables by armor and send-off 
electrical currents which are received on board 
ships sailing in and out of the channel. By 
means of these signals an operator on the ship 
can ascertain when the steamer is off her course. 
As long as the signals can be heard by the 
operator on board the captain knows that he is 
in safe waters and on a direct course. 

Aerial operations on a scale never before 
attempted on the Pacific Coast, according to 
Navy officers, have been planned as a part of 
a spectacular night attack which will be made 
on battle-ships and destroyers off San Pedro 
September 30, Captain Harry Henry Mustin, 
commander of the air force, Pacific fleet, an- 
nounced. The aircraft maneuvers are in a way 
preliminary to the interfleet battle operations 
which will be staged in the Panama roads next 
January. At the San Pedro maneuvers it will 
be the object of the fleet air forces to find, 
bomb and "destroy" battle-ships and destroyers 
bent ou a night attack on the San Pedro fortifi- 
cations. Three divisions of the F-5-L type sea- 
planes, a division of torpedo planes, the aircraft 
tender "Aroostock" and two submarine chasers 
will leave San Diego for San Pedro September 
27. On the night of September 30 they will 
be joined by the two large dirigibles from 
North Island. The aircraft will then head out 
to sea to intercept and attack the five battle- 
ships and eighteen destroyers steaming in battle 
formation from Hawaii. The fleet will use 
searchlights and anti-aircraft batteries against 
the air forces. 



S. T. Hogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer. Seamen's 
cases a specialty. Sixth floor, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1830.— Adv. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

67-69 Front Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass MILLER JENSEN, Agent 

1% Lewis Street 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa o. CHRISTIANSEN. Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JAMES C. BURNS, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WM. MILLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I ALFRED TAMKE, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga L. A. PARKS, Agent 

27 Houston Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla C. THEO. IVERSON Agent 

12% Liberty Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C H. COOK, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. V. ROREN, Agent 

433 Court Street 

BALTIMORE, Md J. A. MORRIS, Agent 

1641 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa DAVID COOK, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

MOBILE, Ala J. w. ENGLAND, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex R. M. WILSON, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga 21 West Bay Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C W. ROSSI, Agent 

49 Market Street 
Sub Aqencies: 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEAN W. MENDELL, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla CHAS. OGRAIN, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PORTLAND, Me 5 Exchange Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 669 Eddy Street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md LAWRENCE GILL, Agent 

804 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex HARRY BROWN, Agent 

321% Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAN LYONS, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala JAMES GRACE, Agent 

11% St. Francis Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I C. BLAKNEY, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me A. ANDRADE, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga GEO. McMURDO, Agent 

523 East Bay Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla J. T. HADAWAY, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C J. T. ROBINSON, Agent 

49 Market Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

Headquarters: 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary. 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass F. L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

NEW BEDFORD, Mass C. E. DOUCETT, Agent 

91 North Second Street 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

H. ESKIN, Secretary 

HOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
D. J. GEDDES, President 

NEW HAVEN, Conn 13% Collls Rtre«t 

(Continued on Pag* 11) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Franclaco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRKNBERG Editor 

8. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.50 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Rusiness and Eilitorial Office. Maritime Hall Bldg.. 

IS Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103. Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22. 1920. 



ANTI-WAR RESOLUTIONS. 



Several months ago the Journal referred 
editorially to the effort* of Australian sea- 
men to prevent war. 

Since that time the executive council of 
the Federated Seamen's Union of Australia 
has launched a movement for an international 
conference of representatives of all maritime 
unions throughout the world, "with a view- 
to preventing future conflict." A circular 
letter signed by the general president, H. J. 
Murray, is said to have been dispatched to 
maritime bodies in Great Britain, Germany, 
France, Denmark, Holland. Norway, Sweden, 
Canada, United States. Argentina. Japan, 
India. Africa and other countries, calling for 
a referendum on a meeting-place and the 
date of the world conference. 

The union's letter says, in part : 

\s nun we cannot evade our responsibilities 
toward the world and towards humanity. With- 
out our consent and co-operation the calamity 
of war cannot again fall upon the world. We 
call upon you seamen of the world, to organize 
a conference somewhere in Europe, where we 
can meet without regard to country, race or 
creed. 

Upon us the future of civilization, indeed the 
verj existence of hundreds di millions of our 
fellow creatures, depends. But for us the 
richest and most prosperous and populous cities 
would he desolate, and empires, supported 
h they may be with colossal wealth and 
innumerable military forces, would crumble into 
ruins. 

The efforts of our Australian comrades 
are highly commendable. But while their 
circular letter was being written a confer- 
ence of the world's merchant seamen was 
actually in session and the only seamen's 
organization of any size not represented was 
the one in Australia. 

Both the Genoa and the Brussels confer- 
ence of the International Seafarers' Federa- 
tion considered the proper attitude of the 
world's seamen toward future wars. 

Tn Brussels the seamen's delegates from 
France, Belgium and Holland introduced this 
resolution : 

WHEREAS, The people and not the govern- 
ments always have borne the brunt and burden 
of wars; and 

WHEREAS, The seamen, among the workers, 
are the most exposed to the perils of war; and 

WHEREAS, Mure than anyone else in the 
world, thev hate armed conflicts and have the 



indomitable will to prevent in the future the 
recurrence of frightful human slaughter; 

And now, expressing its international soli- 
darity with workingmen and confronted with 
the renewed threats of war now striking hu- 
manity, the International Congress of Seamen, 
meeting in Brussels, therefore declares, follow- 
ing the stand of the Congress of Miners, which 
met in Geneva, that a general strike shall be 
ordered in case of any new attempt to begin 
war; and further 

RF.SOLYED, To emphasize the importance of 
this declaration, to refuse, immediately to allow 
the transportation of soldiers and of war am- 
munition to the countries at war with each other 
at the present time. 

The resolution was adopted although but 

few of the forty-five delegates present had 

authority to commit their union to a strike. 

Certainly, the delegates from America had 

no such authority. Strikes in America are 

declared by a vote of the membership) — not 

by officials. 

As regards the refusal to transport sol- 
diers and ammunition most of the delegates 
interpreted the resolution to mean that their 
respective organizations would co-operate 
with the workers ashore in any joint efforts 
to tie up transports. But it was emphatically 
stated and distinctly understood that the 
seamen alone could not and would not act 
in this matter. When munitions of war are 
manufactured by union men, hauled to the 
docks by organized railroad workers and 
loaded on the vessel by union longshoremen 
it is surely a case of "passing the buck" in 
expecting the seamen alone to go on strike. 

In matters of this kind the seamen have 
always done more than their share. The 
trouble has been, of course, that usually the 
seamen are expected not merely to do their 
share — but to do it all ! That this is unfair 
and unreasonable need scarcely be stated. 
But, having had much bitter experience along 
these lines, our friends in Australia will 
doubtless understand all this. At any rate, 
the seamen's representatives who met in 
Brussels last month did understand. And 
the 300,000 merchant seamen represented by 
them may be depended upon to co-operate 
with the workers of the world in carrying 
out to the letter any equitable program that 
may be agreed upon to stop further war. 

The workers everywhere are opposed to 
war because war is opposed to the interests 
of labor and to the interests of the world's 
civilization. Labor fights in all wars. Labor 
suffers and perishes in all wars. Labor never 
profits from any war. Labor never profits 
from militarism. Labor's interest is the in- 
terest of the common people of all nations, 
who for centuries have been the poor, be- 
trayed pawns of the rulers and the ruling 
classes. When the power of labor is suffi- 
ciently established wars will cease, because 
there will be no more soldiers to fight in 
them. 

For notwithstanding all the hatred and 
bitterness engendered during the late war, 
it is still to the interest of labor — and, again, 
to the interest of civilization — that the work- 
ing men of all nations shall recognize one 
another as brothers, and shall peaceably 
join in the common task of advancing the 
welfare of all working people everywhere. 
There are no frontiers in the labor move- 
ment. 



In sympathy with other commodities 
used by mankind, the price of salt has 
been mounting upward. Yet. the volume 
of the salt in the ocean, according to the 
I nited States Geological Survey, is enough 
to cover the entire .surface of the United 
States to a depth of 8.500 feet. 



AN EXPLODED THEORY. 



Tell an untruth often enough and a great 
many people will accept it for gospel truth ! 

This is the case even with certain jour- 
nalists and others who ought to know 
better because of available facilities for 
getting correct information. Eor example. 
Mr. George J. Duraind, an accomplished 
publicist, has been writing a series of highly 
interesting articles for the San Erancisco 
Chronicle, all relating to ocean transporta- 
tion, sea power and kindred subjects. In 
trying to work up a case for ship subsidy 
Mr. Duraind weakens his entire argument by 
trying to prove too much. Time after time 
the alleged reason for the retirement of the 
old Pacific Mail Company from the trans- 
Pacific trade has been exploded. Never- 
theless, Mr. Duraind picks up that stale old 
yarn about the La Follette Seamen's Act 
having compelled th Pacific Mail Co. to go 
out of business. He says: 

For ten years the Southern Pacific carried the 
Pacific Mail at a hiss. So low had the Pacific 
Mail sank that the lapanese came very near 
absorbing it in toto. It was known that the 
ships of the Pacific Mail were in the market 
in 1912, and the Japanese made an offer for 
them. 

The Pacific Mail was continued to be carried 
.it a loss, when the passage <>f the La Follette 
lull increasing operating costs, gave the dying 
the final shove-off. Evidently the Government 
thought that the best way to further a merchant 
marine was to make it impossible for the ship 
operators to make a dollar out of their ships. 
or rather that the more that was lost the more 
els would be put in service. At the same 
time the same Legislators were handing out 
millions to increase shipping on our great 
navigable streams without any results at all. 

This, the Journal's readers will recall, 
is the same old story as originally told by 
Mr. R. P. Schwerin. once Vice-President 
and Manager of the Company. Unfor- 
tunately for Messrs. Schwerin and Duraind 
there is some earlier testimony on that sub- 
ject. And the man who gave it is none 
other than Mr. Schwerin. 

Speaking before the Committee on Mer- 
chant Marine and Fisheries, on February 1. 
1913 (two years before the Seamen's bill 
was enacted into law), Mr. Schwerin made 
it perfectly clear that his company was going 
out of business because of the Panama Canal 
and the legislation connected therewith. 

The so-called Panama Canal Act, approved 
August 24. 1912, prohibits vessels owned by 
the railroads from passing through the 
Canal. The majority of the stock of the 
Pacific Mail was owned by the Southern 
Pacific Company, and vessels owned by that 
company were therefore excluded. 

Naturally this had greatly discouraged 
Mr. Schwerin. Thus it came to pass that 
Mr. Ayres. a member of the before-men- 
tioned committee, asked him why he felt so 
gloomy about the future of the American 
merchant marine. Well, here is Schwerin's 
answer, duly recorded in print and never 
refuted by the gentleman himself: 

Mr. Schwerin. If you had struggled for 
twenty years as I have, taken a line that was a 
million and a quarter in debt, and practically 
in the hands of a receiver, doubled that line up 
by slow, hard process, until you had gotten into 
Korea and Siberia, which you were told 
would be your graveyard, and then you got 
Mongolia and Manchuria, and were told that 
would settle it; and then, against all the better 
judgment of your associates and friends, vou 
id $12,000,000 to build four 37,000-ton ships 
to put in the trade from New York to the 
Philippine Islands, and a million and a half to 
change these four ships to the latest modern 
types, and you were defeated by Congress — 
prohibited by Congress from building tho 
ships -I think you would be a little discouraged. 
I want to say that I am done with the American 
flag forever. 1 would not raise my hand to 
dollar for the American flag. My interest 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



in this business before this committee to-day, 
gentlemen, is absolutely because I am practically 
subpoenaed here. I have no interest in the 
shipping business. I am about to retire. I 
have given twenty years of my life, morning, 
noon and night— slept and breathed with it — to 
see that flag on the ocean, and T am just as 
certain as I sit here that if those four ships 
bad been built, I would have had four more for 
the coast of South America, and four more 
equal to the "Iniperator" that is going to run to 
Europe, all under the American flag. 

Considering- the foregoing confession, it is 

respectfully submitted, that there does not 

appear to be any cause or occasion to blame 

the Seamen's Act for the sale of the five 

vessels, which had been in the trade to the 

Orient. The Pacific Mail quit on account 

of the Panama Canal and the changed trade 

route. The Canal was built to open up a 

cheaper trade route. When the Canal was 

ready the railroads went out of the shipping 

business because being forbidden to use the 

Canal they could no longer regulate rates 

by competing with themselves. All of which 

is respectfully submitted to Mr. Duraind. 



THE "UNION SHOP." 



The principle of the Union Shop, often 
misnamed the "closed shop," is accepted in 
everyday business life. 

The dealer will agree with the manu- 
facturer to handle only a certain kind of 
goods. This is considered perfectly legiti- 
mate. 

Why then may not an organization of 
workingmen similarly make a bargain with 
an organization of employers? Why does it 
seem unconstitutional when precisely the 
same arrangement is entered into between 
the employer and his employes? 

The labor union says to the employer: 
"We will agree to furnish you with compe- 
tent men at so much per day. We can con- 
trol the men in our organization. They will 
abide by the contract that we shall make. 
We cannot control the men who are outside 
of our organization, so we ask you to em- 
ploy only our men, thus making your shop 
a union shop. If these outside men will 
agree to make the same contract with you 
that we have made we shall be glad to have 
them come into our organization, thus giving 
them the same privilege that we enjoy." 

The average employer who fights so stren- 
uously for the "God-given right" of the 
non-union workingman to exercise his priv- 
ilege of remaining out of the union if he 
so desires, declaring that his shop must be 
an "open shop" for free men, will usually 
blacklist the man who exercised the same 
God-given right by becoming a member of 
the trade-union. So, to all practical pur- 
poses the boasted "open-shop" policy usually 
means a "closed shop" to the unionist. 



One does not have to be a Socialist to 
feel intensely gratified over the re-election 
of the five New York Assemblymen who 
were expelled from the State Legislature 
last spring for no other reason than their 
belief in socialism. Elected as socialists, 
these men were deprived of their seats 
because the majority had the power to 
do so. Talk about the rights of minori- 
ties! Well, it would be a sad day for 
representative government if this practice 
were put into general operation. Repre- 
sentative government would simply cease 
to exist. And those who in the name of 
patriotism resort to such tactics are doing 
more to destroy the people's faith in 
popular government than all the bomb 
throwers and anarchists on earth. 



DISSECTING "ARTICLE X." 



United States Senator Borah, in an Address at 

Dayton, O., Analyzes Article X of the 

League of Nations. 



What is the "principle" which we find em- 
bodied in Article X? Whose creed is it? It 
is an old and familiar principle, this doctrine 
of territorial integrity. There has not been a 
despot in Europe in five hundred years who in 
the height of his success has not been in favor 
of territorial integrity. On the other hand, 
there has not been an oppressed and down- 
trodden people who have not opposed it and 
for the sake of liberty defied it. It is a great 
creed for those who are dominant, for those 
who enjoy unchallenged power, but it is anguish 
and travail for those who are governed against 
their will and who are seeking liberty. One 
of the main objects of the Holy Alliance was 
to preserve the territorial integrity of all mem- 
bers of the league. Now after the Versailles 
conference had divided the earth and remade 
the map of the world, after their combined 
scepter had been established "Over veteran 
legions and subject realms" there is evoked this 
principle — the principle of the victors, plucked 
from the creed of the Vienna Congress, of 
territorial integrity. And we are to underwrite 
and guarantee it all. Under Article X it would 
be impossible for any people anywhere to ever 
secure their liberty except by the unanimous 
consent of the dominant powers of the League. 
A more autocratic combination of power has 
never been conceived. 

My friends — and I say this with the utmost 
personal consideration for those who hold a 
different view — the standard set up in this 
League is all wrong. Democracies will never 
subscribe to it. The people will never accept 
it. It is the standard of the 17th century. 
It is the standard of the old Vienna Congress. 
It is the supreme tenet from despotism's revolt- 
ing creed. Territorial integrity, regardless of 
how the territory was acquired or the wants 
and aspirations of the men and women who 
occupy it — can you conceive of a standard more 
at war *with human progress — more unjust 
toward subject peoples? 

Territorial integrity — that would have covered 
the thirteen colonies and would have executed 
Sam Adams and John Hancock as traitors. 
That would have covered Cuba and held her 
in bondage until the last child had perished of 
hunger and the last mother had been murdered 
by the petty slaves of remorseless tyrants. 
That standard will cover Egypt, Korea, Ireland 
and Shantung — titles founded in fraud and force 
and broken pledges, titles sustained against the 
hopes and prayers of millions petitioning through 
decades and centuries for their freedom, peti- 
tions which no democracy could deny and live. 
Such a rule denies fruition to those passions 
and hopes without which the human family 
would sink into loathsome bestiality. 

Suppose Germany had won this fight. What 
rule would she have invoked? Territorial in- 
tegrity! Would she not have declared that her 
conquered dominions should henceforth be pro- 
tected — that territorial integrity should here- 
after forever be the standard to which all 
peace-loving nations should adhere? It would 
have been her creed. Germany having failed 
and the Allies having won, we now invoke the 
rule. Japan holding Korea and Shantung — 
which is another name for the dismemberment 
of China; France holding her possessions in 
China, Syria and Africa; England holding one- 
fourth of the inhabitable globe — in other words, 
with the world's territory satisfactorily di- 
vided and distributed — we now, against all sub- 
ject peoples and in the face of the most solemn 
pledges of freedom and independence, invoke 
the rule of territorial integrity. It is auto- 
cratic, it is despotic, it is unconscionable. It 
is un-American! It is a soulless, conscienceless 
task from which the American people turn with 
unconcealed aversion as the hideous thing un- 
folds. It means oppression! It means injustice! 
It means war! 

If the League of Nations could have been 
built upon the principle which the President 
promised and upon which no doubt he intended 
it to be built before he went to Europe— upon 
the rights of small nations and the principle 
of self-determination — the doctrine of territorial 
integrity would have been tolerable in theory 
though, I think, impossible in practice. But 
Europe would have none of these principles. 
She rejected them one by one. Now with this 
league built upon the wrongs of small nations 
and the denial of the principles of self-determi- 
nation — Shantung, Korea, Syria, Egypt and 
countless other instances — with new wrongs 
established and old wrongs left unrighted, with 
all these things wrought into the very texture 
and being of the league — the principle of terri- 
torial integrity becomes a hideous conspiracy 
against millions of downtrodden and oppressed 
people — the most gigantic scheme of imperialism, 
guaranteed and nailed down, of which history 
furnishes any record. If the American Republic 
is to remain as the fathers made it — a Govern- 
ment based upon the maxims of liberty and nol 

(Continued on Page 11.) 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 20, 1920. 
Regular weekly meeting called to order at 7 
p. m., F.d. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping medium; many members ashore, 

ED. ROSENBERG, 
Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS 



Members at San Francisco must not ship 
themselves to join vessels at Agencies. Those 
that do will be required to conform to Shipping 
Rules of Agencies. 

This rule adopted at regular meeting, San 
Francisco, Cal., August 30, 1920. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 

Secretary, p. t. 



Vancouver, B. C. Sept. 13, 1920. 
Shipping very dull; prospects uncertain. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 13, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 13, 1920. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL. Agent. 
84 Seneca Street. P.O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 13, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 13, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN. Agent. 
88 y 3 Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 13, 1920. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. Herman Skipp- 
man was elected agent pro tem. during two- 
weeks' absence of Harrv Ohlsen. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128 J4 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 7. 1920. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

TOSEPH FALTUS, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 16, 192(1. 

Shipping quiet. Nominated delegate to Califor- 
nia State Federation of Labor convention to 
be held at Fresno, Cal., October 4, 1920. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
No. 42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 9, 1920. 
Shipping quiet. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room No. 203. P. O. 
Box 514. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro, Sept. 8, 1920. 
Shipping fair. 

JOSEPH MACK, Agent. 
No. 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 54. Phone 
Sunset 547-W. 

DIED 

Karl Sigfried Larsen, No. 2389, a native ol 
United States, age 23. Died in the U. S. Marine- 
Hospital, Sept. 19, 1920. 

Michel Brizga, No. 2443, a native of Russia, 
age 26. Drowned in Nushagak, Alaska, in Julv 
month, 1920. 

Uno Edward Lax, No. 952, n native of Fin- 
land, age 38. Died in Koggiung. Alaska, in the 
spring of 1919. 

Captain G. F. Peterson, master of the brigan 
tine "Jeanette," operated by Wightman & Crane 
of San Francisco, was drowned at Newcastle. 
Aus., early last month, according to mail ad- 
vices received by .1. M. Daily, manager of the 
marine department of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. His body was recovered. Captain Petei 
son evidently had fallen overboard from a gai 
plank at night. Captain Peterson was 57 yeat 
old and is survived by a widow and two daugh 
tcrs living in Alameda, Cal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE 300TH ANNIVERSARY. 



The year 1920 is doubly significant, his- 
torically. It marks the 300th anniversary 
of two important events which led to the 

founding of the Republic of the United 
States of America. I >ne is the signing of 
the Mayflower compact and the landing of 
the pilgrims; and the other is the meeting 
of the first American legislative assembly. 

On November 11, 1620, in the cabin of 
the Mayflower, a tiny bark lying off the 
Massachusetts coast, a little band of lib- 
erty-loving men, from "Rrittania." entered 
into what history has styled the Mayflower 
Compact. This agreement bound the 
forty-one adult males in the ship's com- 
pany in a civil body politic for the better 
ordering, preserving and furthering of their 
mutual ends. And it provided for such 
jusl and equal laws and offioes as should 
be necessary for the general good of the 
colony. 

Ten days later, so records Dr. Charles 
\V. Kh'ot's inscription on the Pilgrim Me- 
morial Monument at Provincetown, Mass.. 
"the Mayflower, carrying 102 passengers, 
men and women and children, cast anchor 
in this harbor sixty-seven days from Ply- 
mouth, England. 

"This body politic, established and main- 
tained on this bleak and barren edge of a 
vast wilderness, a State without a king 
or a noble, a church without a bishop or 
a priest, a democratic commonwealth, the 
members of which were straitly tied to all 
care of each other's good, and of the whole 
by every one. 

"With long-suffering devotion and sober 
resolution they illustrated for the first 
time in history the principles of civil and 
religious liberty and the practice of a 
genuine democracy." 

Meantime, uninformed of the Pilgrims, 
fellow-colonists of Captain John Smith had 
met at "lames City" ( Jamestown') , Vir- 
ginia, for the first American Legislative 
Assembly. On July 30, 1619, they had 
thus broken ground for the foundation of 
the present democratic form of government 
in the I nited States. 

This year (in 1 920 1 these events are 
being commemorated in the United States, 
in England and in Holland. Tn August 
the origin of the Pilgrim movement was 
celebrated in England. And early in Sep- 
tember meetings were held in Holland in 
memory of the Pilgrims' sojourn in that 
country. 

Tn September a "second Mayflower" will 
set sail from Southampton, England, to 
follow to the American shore the path 
taken by the original Mayflower. (But 
this second "Mayflower" will be modern. 
and therefore much more seaworthy than 
her smaller predecessor. - ) 

This boat, carrying many prominent 
people of England, Holland and the United 
States, will anchor in Provincetown Har- 
bor in late September. Its arrival will per- 
haps mark the crowning dramatic episode 
of the entire Tercentenary celebrations. 

These events will not be celebrated in 
the United States by the citizens of Massa- 
chusetts and Virginia alone. Xor solely 
by the Xew England and South Atlantic 
States. Communities throughout America 
are planning to take this opportunity to 
review the "foundation upon which the 
United States rests" — and to re-emphasize 



those principles which these ancestors es- 
tablished — and which their sons, their fol- 
lowers, and their followers' sons have 
handed down to us through our form of 
representative form of government. 

America is appropriating, from national 
and State treasuries, hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars to be used in plans for 
the commemoration. One plan is to erect, 
overlooking Plymouth Harbor, a colossal 
statue of Massasoit, the Indian chief, who 
befriended the Puritan pioneer. Another 
is to set the Plymouth Rock, which in 
1741 was raised above the tide, in its 
original position. 

Seventy American cities, including Xew 
York, Chicago and Boston, have started 
plans for their celebrations of the Ter- 
centenary. The Sulgrave Institution and 
tin American Mayflower Council have been 
active in co-ordinating these plans. 



THE BREAD LINE "REMEDY." 



Corporation psychology is disclosed by 
propaganda that is being circulated by the 
Pennsylvania and other railroads. Hun- 
dreds of thousands of pamphlets have been 
placed in the hands of employes and others 
directing attention to the increase of un- 
employment and warning workers that 
they soon will be in position where they 
will be compelled to bow to the dictation 
of the bosses. • 

If this movement to restrict operating 
forces becomes general, the statement says. 
our economic ills will be cured. Then 
"the world's woes will take wing." All 
that is required to restore peace ami pros- 
perity is to crowd the bread lines with 
hungrj workers. It will warm the cockles 
of the hearts of proud corporation chief- 
tains when the} witness tin- spectacle of 
millions of men pleading for jobs that are 
theirs as a matter of right. 

The Pennsylvania thinks the workers 
have been too prosperous — that high wages 
have gone to their head, like new wine, 
and made them do foolish things. They 
have been buying "too many silk shirts, 
$20 shoes, $7? suits." This has been 
"more than lots of workers could stand." 
Xow they are to get back to hard pan. 
"The swanking and the swaggering will 
shortly be on the wane," the Pennsylvania 
In 'pis. "Workers will pay more attention 
to their jobs and less attention to agitators 
who fill no pay envelopes, but fill their 
followers only with wind." 

The sinister phase of this propaganda 
is that it is being paid for with govern- 
ment funds. During the first four months 
of private control following the return of 
the railroads the Pennsylvania received 
from the Federal treasury nearly $27,000,- 
000, of wdiich something more than five 
millions covered the guaranteed return. 
Twenty-one and a half millions represented 
in operating revenue. In the cor- 
responding months under Federal control, 
the Pennsylvania earned $7,491,093. two 
and a quarter millions more than the 
rental. 

A considerable portion of the money 

taken by the Pennsylvania from the people 

worse than wasted. It has financed 

propositions against the welfare of the 

public and its employers. 

There is no new lesson in these revela- 
tions, unless it be that the railroad mind 



has not altered during the past five years. 
The average corporation official is just as 
arrogant, just as ignorant of what is 
transpiring in this world, as the Bourbon 
ever dared be. 



DREAMS OF THE GENERAL STAFF. 



Tt is not generally known, except in offi- 
cial circles, that the War Plans Division 
of the General Staff has just completed for 
Secretary Baker a "survey'' of the army 
post> and cantonments to ascertain what 
i hanges, if any, would be required to 
adapt them 

(a) to a system of universal military 
training, and 

(b) to the care of an army of 7,000,000 
men. 

The report will be ready for Congress 
when the latter convenes in December for 
the so-called "short session." 

It is about time, however, that somebody 
injected this little item into the presiden- 
tial campaign. What stand do Messrs. 
Cox and Harding take on these two issues 
so obligingly outlined for them by the 
General Staff? 

Lord Wolseley, the great British gen- 
eral, published a handbook some years ago 
strictly for soldiers. It is called "The 
Soldier's Pocket Book" and it is used to 
this day in the English Army. In that 
book General Wolseley sums up the char- 
acter of General Staffs the world over: 
"The soldier must be taught to believe 
that his duties are the noblest which fall 
to a man's lot. He must be taught to 
despise all those of civil life. Soldiers. 
like missionaries, must be fanatics." 



ARE THE OCEANS SHRINKING? 



That the general sea-level of the world 
was once about twenty feet higher than 
it is now is asserted by Prof. Reginald 
V Da'y, of Harvard, in a paper read before 
the National Academy of Sciences. ( >ur 
quotations below are from a review by 
Raymond II. Torrey in The Evening Post 
(Xew York). The lowering that Pro- 
fessor Daly thinks is taking place is quite 
independent of the local rise .and fall of 
shore-lines, due to warping of the earth's 
crust, and familiar to geologists in all parts 
of the world. Professor Daly believes 
be caused by variation in the size of 
the south polar ice-cap. Seven hundred 
feet more of ice piled on the mass covering 
the antarctic regions would take enough 
water from the ocean to lower its total 
level throughout the globe by twenty 
If climatic changes in the future 
should meet the polar cap to some extent, 
this action might restore to the ocean the 
twenty feet that it has lost in past ages. 
Says Mr. Torrey in his review: 

"It has long been known that the ocean 
shore-lines in various parts of the world 
have risen or fallen, even in historic times, 
and there is plenty of evidence that such 
changes are still going on. Our Atlantic 
coast has sunk in comparatively recent 
geological time, and is still sinking, though 
at the rate of only a few inches in a 
century. 

"Tlu- Hudson for most of its length to 
Albany is a 'drowned' river in a prehistoric 
gorge invaded by salt waters when the 
land lowered. Xew York State has risen 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



from one hundred to eight hundred feet, 
progressing from Long Island to the Cana- 
dian border, since the last glacial invasion, 
when the retreat of the ice to the north 
released its burden upon the land. 

"But these changes, huge as they were 
in themselves, are local compared to the 
proposition of a general lowering of the 
ocean-level. Professor Daly calls such a 
movement eustatic — that is, general or 
world-wide. Among the possible causes 
which he lists are movements of the earth's 
crust whereby the capacity of the ocean 
basin is diminished or increased ; the heap- 
ing up of material on the ocean floor by the 
deltas of great rivers or by material 
thrown up by submarine volcanoes ; vol- 
canic addition of new water to the ocean; 
subtraction of water which becomes chem- 
ically involved during the alteration of 
rocks ; glaciation on land, lowering the 
amount of water in the sea, and conse- 
quently its level, by relocating it in land 
ice, and changes in the earth's center of 
gravity and in its speed of rotation. 

"Professor Daly reports many recent 
observations of changes in sea-level which 
suggest the possibility of a sinking of 
general level of nearly twenty feet during 
the time of man. 

"His attention was first called to the 
possibility of such a general sinking by 
observations on postglacial beaches in 
Labrador and Newfoudland as compared 
with others higher up in the Gulf of St. 
Lawrence in the neighborhood of Quebec. 
He found, as earlier geologists had done, 
higher strands which showed evidence of 
warping since they were abandoned by the 
sea which formed them. This warping 
has been accounted for by the relief from 
the burden of ice brought about when the 
continental ice-sheet melted at the close 
of the last glacial period. 

"But below these warped beaches Pro- 
fessor Daly found the lowest emerged 
terrace along the shores of the gulf to be 
conspicuously level for three hundred miles 
below Quebec. The uniformity suggested 
that the strand had been abandoned by 
the waves because of a general sinking 
of sea-level. It was continuous at about 
twenty feet above present high tide. Sim- 
ilar evidence was found on the shores of 
Nova Scotia and the island of Anticosti." 

Dr. A. G. Mayor, director of the marine 
laboratory of the Carnegie Institution in 
Washington, has reported similar data 
as to Samoa and Florida. On Tutuila, the 
largest island under American control in 
the Samoan group, he found wave-cut 
beaches eight feet above high tide, and 
large sea caves which were cut when the 
high-tide mark was nearly twenty feet 
higher than now. Similar beaches were 
found in other islands seventy-five miles 
away. Says Mr. Torrey : 

"The crests of the abandoned beaches 
were constant and level, and explanation 
by local uplift, through movements of the 
earth's crust, was held by Dr. Mayor to 
be improbable since uplift of such uni- 
formity is unknown to geology. 

"Other records of the abandonment by 
the sea of old beaches have been found 
in the British Isles, the Atlantic coast of 
North America, south of New York, the 
West Indies, Brazil, Patagonia, Antarctica, 
New Zealand, and Australia. On the 
coasts of Georgia and Florida what geolo- 



gists call the Pensacola-Satilla terrace runs 
for five hundred miles at a practically uni- 
form set of levels, the highest about 
twenty feet. 

"Nearly a thousand miles of the eastern 
and northern coasts of Australia show a 
similar emergence of ten to twenty feet. 
Such extensive records of shifting sea- 
level are held by Professor Daly to pre- 
clude the explanation of warping of the 
earth's crust due to local changes. 

"That such changes are comparatively 
recent is held by Professor Daly to be 
proved by the fact that fossils on these 
abandoned shores are of animals similar 
to those now living in adjoining seas, or to 
those found in seas which were a few de- 
grees warmer. Many geologists hold that 
the temperature of the sea was slightly 
higher in the period when these beaches 
might have been formed. 

"As to a probable explanation of the 
causes of a twenty-foot drop in the world- 
wide level of the ocean, Professor Daly 
says : 

" 'The most promising idea appears to 
be that a few thousand years ago there was 
an increase in the volume of the existing, 
non-floating glaciers. If the antarctic ice- 
cap were thickened to the average amount 
of about seven hundred feet, an average 
sinking of sea-level to the extent of nearly 
twenty feet would be inevitable. In favor 
of this suggestion would be evidence of 
a world-wide oscillation of climate like 
that which seems to have affected the 
Christiania region (in Norway) in recent 
time. If the whole earth was a little 
warmer than now (in a period of a few 
thousand years ago), less water may have 
been taken from the ocean to constitute the 
ice-caps, and sea-level was a little higher 
than at present. The oscillation as a whole 
would be but an incident in a series of 
climatic and oceanic changes which began 
with the opening of the glacial period.' 

"Professor Daly's hypothesis seems to 
imply that if for any reason the antarctic 
ice-cap were reduced, its contained water 
would be restored to the ocean, and unless 
other conditions intervened there might, 
in the course of thousands of years, be a 
rise of the world-wide ocean-level back to 
something like the point from which it 
has retreated." 



HURRICANE WARNINGS. 



The United States Weather Bureau is 
engaged in a determined effort to combat 
the danger of hurricanes in the Gulf of 
Mexico and South Atlantic regions by the 
adoption of a system of upper air observa- 
tions at a number of stations in the West 
Indies and in the Southern States. The 
service will continue until the end of No- 
vember, July to November being the period 
in which most West Indian hurricanes 
occur. 

Observations will be made by means of 
balloons liberated in the upper regions of 
the air. These will be sent up twice a day 
and a record kept of their direction and 
rate of movement. Results will be tele- 
graphed to the central office of the weather 
bureau at Washington, whence compiled 
information and warnings will be sent 
broadcast. 

The general theory of the service is that 



the movement of the West India hurri- 
canes up the Atlantic coast or farther 
westward into the Gulf of Mexico is 
largely determined by the trade and anti- 
trade winds. If this be true, it is thought 
that the direction and velocity of the 
upper air currents will enable the fore- 
caster to determine their nature at any 
given time. 

Stations at which the observations will 
be made are San Juan and Santo Domingo 
in the West Indies; Colon in the Panama 
Canal Zone; Leesburg, Ga. ; Groesbeck, 
Tex., and Ellington and Kelly aviation 
fields, also in Texas. 

The annual hurricanes in South Atlantic 
and Gulf sections have almost always been 
attended with enormous damage to ship- 
ping. Not only have many noble ships 
been destroyed and many hundreds of 
lives lost, but also transportation has been 
seriously interfered with because of cau- 
tion necessitated by the advent of the 
hurricane season. If the weather bureau's 
latest plan proves helpful in enabling it to 
give warnings of hurricanes, the system 
will be of immense benefit to shipowners, 
shipmasters, passengers and freight ship- 
pers. — Salt Lake Tribune. 



"So long as a man can be evicted and 
banished from the local community at the 
will of the landlord there can be no in- 
dependence and no possible freedom of 
self-government worthy of the name. 
* By recognizing private property 
in land, the State has set up in its midst a 
number of petty lords more powerful than 
any government, and whose decrees, what- 
ever injustice they may do or whatever 
misery bring to British subjects, no court 
of law or equity is able to reverse." — Alfred 
Russell Wallace. 



Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utili- 
ties. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and 
telephone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man 
suffrage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds tor 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by tht 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3) 



vious war. will use $3,855,482,586, or 67.8 
per cent. The army and navy will use 
$1,424,138,577, or 25 per cent. 

Dr. Rosa shows that the cost of wars 
and the maintenance of war equipment 
means a tax of $50 per capita on each 
of the 110.000.000 people of this country. 
while the tax for efficiency, education, 
public health and research is about 50 
cents per capita. 



Non-Unionists "Cheeky" Says Official 

Government employes who remain out- 
side the Union, while enjoying benefits the 
Union made possible, were denounced by 
Attorney-General McTiernan of New South 
\\ ales. 

Replying to a delegation of workers who 
were demanding certain governmental re- 
forms, including preference to unionists, 
the Attorney-General said: 

"I think it is most outrageous that any 
person should remain deliberately outside 
the ranks of a union and then have the 
'cheek' to share the benefits the union 
has procured. It is arrogance and hide 
of a very high order, indeed. I am sure 
the Government will help industrial organ- 
izations of employes to prevent the recur- 
rence of this sort of thing in the future." 

The Australian Worker makes this com- 
ment on the law official's statement: 

"Of course, Attorney-General McTier- 
nan's observations have raised something 
of a sensation in the columns of the cap- 
italist newspapers. They denounce it as 
autocracy of the worst form. Standing as 
they do for docile, groveling and servile 
non-union civil service, the idea that civil 
servants should be unionized is a night- 
mare too hideous for words." 



Non-Unionists Routed 

< Irganized labor in Tucson, Ariz., has 
defeated an attempt t" establish the non- 
union shop and individual bargaining. 

The antis have taken down their non- 
union shop "white cards" and have hoisted 
the white flag, and assure several se 
of the trade union movement that "We 
never meant you.'' To this the unionists 
reply, "Dry your crocodile tears." 

When the anti-union movement started 
large numbers of business and professional 
men eidisted. Organized labor refused to 
stampede, however, and the attack resulted 
in greater solidarity and a substantial cm 
operative movement that is backed by la- 
bor's purchasing power. 

The result is shown in this statement 
by the Tucson Record, published by the 
Central Trades Council : 

"At the inception of this movement, 
the non-union shop cards were as thick 
as fleas on an itinerant pup. Now count 
'em. You will not be carried into higher 
mathematics in doing so." 



Sell Dyed Water 
Dyed water is being sold for orange 

juice, says the bureau of Chemistry, De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

These imitations, it is stated, are usually 
concocted of sweetened, artificially car- 
bonated water, colored with a dye to 
imitate orange juice, and flavored with a 
little oil from the peel of the orange. 



While they may not contain ingredients 
injurious to the health of adults, they are 
imitations and lack the medicinal qualities 
of fruit juices, and should not lie used in 
place of genuine orange juice, especially as 
■ d for babies and young children. 
Attention is called to the fact that the 
soft-drink industry is largely a local indus- 
try. Many of the bottled soft drinks are 
sold and consumed within the State where 
they art' made. Such drinks are not sub- 
ject to the Federal Food and Drugs Act, 
which apply only to food and drugs that 
enter interstate or foreign commerce or 
that are made or sold within the District 
of Columbia or a territory. 

Strikers Jailed by Injunction Judge. 

Justice Bailey of the Colorado State 
Supreme Court has declined to review the 
conviction of seven members of the Denver 
Street Car Men's Union, who were sen- 
tenced to three months in jail by District 
Court Judge Whit ford for contempt of 
court when the street car men suspended 
work. 

In their appeal to the Supreme Court, 
attorneys for the unionists submit these 
questions : 

"Can a district court sitting as a court 
of equity in Colorado enjoin employes 
from striking and quitting the service of 
their employer for better working condi- 
tions or better wages? If such an injunc- 
tion is disobeyed, can the employes be 
held in contempt and punished therefor?" 

"To ask these two questions is to answer 
them," continue the attorneys. "The an- 
swer is 'no' to both questions. It is diffi- 
cult to characterize the proceedings in the 
court below. It is still more difficult to 
calmly review them and comment upon 
them. 

"Here is a judicial proceeding, an in- 
junctive writ, for which there is no war- 
rant in law, nor by statute, nor by com- 
mon law, nor by any constitutional pro- 
vision, nor by line, word or syllable of 
any decided case in the United States or 
of any State in the Union. The proposi- 
tion is so novel that it would challenge 
our surprise if it were not so dangerous 
to the liberty of men." 

The attorneys show that the Colorado 
law , section 3924, states that workers have 
the right to organize and to strike. The 
only restraint in this State now is the 
recently enacted "can't-strike" law, which 
makes it unlawful to strike until the State 
Industrial Commission acts. The workers 
complied with this law and the commis- 
sion's award disposed of the case a 
as the commission is concerned. 

When the street car men struck Judge 
Whitford ordered, the arrest of the seven 
unionists, denied them a trial by jury and 
put them in jail for 90 days. Attorneys 
for the convicted men appealed to the 
State Supreme Court to review the pro- 
ceedings, but this has been denied. 

In their petition to the State's highest 
court, the attorneys said : 

"If a district court can hold citizens in 
contempt and send them to jail and act- 
ually imprison them for disobedience of an 
unlawful injunction in this case, then a 
district court sitting in Colorado can issue 
injunctions of any character and imprison 
citizens who disobey them. Where, then, 
are the liberties of the people of Colorado 



if this sort of a proceeding can be upheld? 

"If a district court can enjoin men from 
striking for a day. it can enjoin them for 
a year or a century. If a district court 
can enjoin men from striking either for 
shorter hours, higher wages or better work- 
ing conditions, then the working people 
of Colorado are hound in chains to their 
employers and can never again collectively 
assert their right to improve their standard 
of living or their lot in life. 

"We assert that if this alleged principle 
of law is upheld we have reached a condi- 
tion of involuntary servitude among the 
working people of Colorado, and involun- 
tary servitude is prohibited by the Consti- 
tution of Colorado and of the United 
States. 

"If a court of equity can enjoin men 
from striking, as has been done in this 
case, then we assert that fundamental con- 
stitutional provisions have been violated." 

In denying the accused a trial by jury 
Judge Whitford violated another State law, 
which provides that where contempt is not 
committed in the presence of the court, 
the person arrested must be accorded a 
trial by jury when such demand is made. 

Judge Whitford ignored still another 
section of Colorado law by refusing to 
grant the accused a stay of proceedings. 



Burleson's Record 100 Per Cent. Anti. 

Postmaster General f'urleson has main- 
tained his 100 per cent, opposition to an 
independent worker by his discharge of 11 
officers of the Chicago Postal Clerks' 
Union. 

In their publicity campaign the clerks 
used statements that were made at hear- 
ings before Congress and the 11 officials 
are dismissed on the ground of violation 
of law that debars employes from solicit- 
ing gifts. The union published a program 
of an entertainment in which advertise- 
ments were printed. 

The average length of service of the 
victimized employes is 15 years, with one 
man nearly 25 years. These men are only 
qualified for the postal service, from which 
they are now debarred. They also lose 
their interest in the civil service pension. 

The latest move by the postal autocrat 
is in accord with a policy that he has 
rigidly maintained. During the war when 
postal employes asked higher wages to 
meet advancing living costs, the Post- 
master General declared that they were 
now getting three times the amount paid 
a soldier. He made no mention of his 
wage, however, which is over 30 times 
more than a soldier received. 

He has opposed organization of em- 
ployes that can not be controlled, he has 
opposed wage increases, he has recom- 
mended that the law providing that eight 
hours' work shall be done in a period of 
10 be amended to eight in 12, and he has 
opposed time and one-half for overtime, 
despite the president's declaration for an 
eight-hour day. 

Practically all of the officers of postal 
employes' national unions are men who 
have been dismissed by the Postmaster 
General because of their protests against 
servitude and their demands that postal 
employes be treated as Americans. 



Building Guild Plan Gaining in England. 
The Manchester Guardian, one of Eng- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



land's foremost liberal newspapers, states 
that at last the Government has the sense 
to acknowledge that the national building 
guild plan "has the roots of a solution" 
of the housing question. 

This plan, says the Guardian, "cuts out 
the middleman, and it guarantees continu- 
ous employment to the operative. The 
government has learned both these lessons 
from the guild and is tardily making ten- 
tative experiments itself in both direct 
and continuous employment. It has even 
had the sense to acknowledge that the 
guild plan, as such, has the roots of a 
solution in it, and to encourage local 
authorities to adopt it." 

The guild was started by organized 
building craftsmen. It includes these 
workers, technicians and administrators, 
who volunteer to erect houses and other 
construction. Profits are placed at the 
disposal of the guild to improve the service 
and to pay wages to workers who are 
unemployed or who are idle because of 
weather conditions. The guild has en- 
tered into contractural relations with the 
co-operative wholesale society for the 
necessary material and with the co-opera- 
tive insurance society for the necessary in- 
surance. 

The guild plan has spread to London, 
where it has been approved by the district 
council of the National Federation of Build- 
ing Trade Operatives. 



AN UNUSUAL VOYAGE 



Tt is nut usual for three salvage cases 
to turn up on a ship's single voyage. But 
this- very noteworthy thing has actually 
occurred. The whole crew of the "East- 
ern Glen," including the officers and cap- 
tain, fifty men altogether, have placed in 
the hands of Attorney Axtell, of New 
York, salvage claims against three ships 
which they picked up and towed during the 
voyage of the "Eastern Glen" from Seat- 
tle to New York. At Acaquapulca, Mex- 
ico, they picked up the S. S. "Silverado", 
and towed her to Balboa, 1,700 miles. 
After coming through the Canal they re- 
ceived distress signals from the S. S. "Lake 
Fariston." She was drifting on the rocky 
Columbian Coast. Four days more towage 
placed her in safety at Colon. They then 
proceeded to New York. 1,000 miles south- 
east of Sandy Hook they found the S. S. 
"Andrew Jackson" in distress. They towed 
her to New York, successfully completing 
this remarkable voyage. 



Arizona is provided with one of the 
few moated strongholds in the United 
States, possibly the only one of its kind. 
The Capitol building now is almost sur- 
rounded with a huge and permanent moat 
that is to be completed this winter and 
in full flood soon afterward. The moat is 
six feet deep and six feet wide and is to 
be equipped with a powerful pumping 
plant for lowering the water level in the 
big circular canal and at the same time 
irrigating the Capitol lawns, trees, and 
beds and flowers. 



If one body of men have a right to quit 
work to compel a necessary improvement 
in the conditions of their lives, no other 
bod) of men can have a right to take their 
places. Tin- court of morals takes no cog- 
nizance of the right to scab. 



MORE POWER TO "THE CALL" 



The victory of the New York Call over 
Postmaster-General Burleson must give a 
peculiar thrill of satisfaction to every news- 
paper and every individual that has had 
dealings with that official during the last 
few years. By withholding for nearly three 
years the Call's second-class mailing privi- 
lege, Mr. Burleson had every reason to 
think — and doubtless hoped— that he would 
ruin the newspaper or drive it out of busi- 
ness as he succeeded in doing with hun- 
dreds of other publications. By the cour- 
age and ability of its editors and managers, 
and the loyalty of its readers, who made 
the survival of the paper their daily busi- 
ness, the Call has not only lived, but 
has lived to get back its rights and 
to prove Mr. Burleson a law-breaker 
or at least a law-stretcher himself. 
But no mere restoration of its mail- 
ing rights can restore the enormous 
sums of money lost through the action of 
the Postmaster-General. Until the Call is 
adequately repaid for the almost incalcul- 
able damage inflicted by the Postmaster- 
General, until some recompense is made 
for his cold-blooded attempt to strangle it 
to death, the case should not be allowed to 
rest. The Call should take immediate 
steps to recover through the Court of 
Claims or by suing the Postmaster-General 
himself the full amount of its damage. — 
New York Nation. 



DISSECTING "ARTICLE X.' 

(Continued from Page 7) 



a Government of force — it will never pledge its 
sous to underwrite or police any such scheme. 

One of the most serious objections to Article 
X is that it places the real power to foment 
war or to force war further than ever from the 
constraining control of the people. While it 
may he true that certain formalities will have 
to be observed, such as in some instances a 
declaration of war, the things which make war 
inevitable are under the absolute control of a 
conclave of European diplomats sitting behind 
closed doors at Geneva. No scheme for peace 
will ever be worthy of a people's confidence 
which does not place the power of peace or 
war in the control of those who must pay the 
taxes and fight the battles when war comes. 
Tf those who make war had to fight the wars 
there would be fewer wars. If I had my way 
about it I would write into the Constitution 
of the United States a provision that no war 
should ever be begun by our country except 
in absolute defense against invasion or actual 
attack until the question has been submitted to 
a vote of the people. If you want to stop 
war, take the power to foment war out of the 
hands of the munition makers and the diplomats 
and place it in the hands or under the control 
of those who must fight and DIE when the 
war comes. The President once very truly said: 
"The people do not make war." Rarely have 
they indeed done so except in defense of their 
own liberties. 

The Council of the League, under Article X, 
could foment war at any time it should see 
fit to do so. Nine men representing the inhab- 
itants of the earth could bring about a condi- 
tion where the people, notwithstanding any pro- 
visions of their respective Constitutions, would 
be dragged or driven into war as they 
have been heretofore nine times out of ten. 
If the territorial integrity of some nation were 
violated or if there was threat of war some- 
where, the Council would have a perfect right, 
according to the terms of the contract which 
we are asked to ratify, to call for a blockade 
or for troops. The fact that some Congress 
had to vote the troops would not protect the 
people at all if you had contracted in advance 
to vote them. Or if they called for the troops 
merely for police purposes, war would inevitably 
follow nine times out of ten. Suppose Shan- 
tung should throw off her false and immoral 
rule and China should assist her, as she would, 
and the Council would call on our President 
to send one hundred thousand men as our pro- 
portion to steady the situation or protect Japan's 
territorial integrity. How long would it be 
after our troops were there until the fighting 
Id commence and war would be on — declara- 
tion or no declaration of Congress? Let the 
i boys in Russia, sent there ostensibly to 
steady the situation or guard a railroad, answer. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5) 
LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark Street 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Secretary 

THOS. A. HANSON. Treasurer 

Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue. Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, WIS CHAS. BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON, Agent 

74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, O S. R. DTE, Agent 

618 Front Street. Phone Bell Navarre 1823 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y J. MURPHY, Agent 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 B. DAFOE, Agent 

3308 E. 92nd Street. Phone South Chicago 7666 

SUPERIOR, Wis W. EDGEWORTH, Agent 

332 Banks Avenue 

CONNEAUT, O W. J. WILSON, Agent 

992 Day Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 71 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 48 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary 

ED HICKS, Treasurer 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

Phone 428-W 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone Broad 131 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 3308 E. 92nd Street 

Phone South Chicago 7666 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

Phone Bell, Navarre 1823 

CLEVELAND, 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 44 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, III 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 571 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash....64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaska 

UNGA Alaska 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1S8 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 

STOCKTON, Cal F. E. McFARLANE, Agent 

46 West Main Street 



BRITISH COLUMBIA STEWARDS' UNION 

FRKi) WALSH, Secretary 

VANCOUVER, B. C ':n Hastings Street, v 

Room 2. Phoni- Sevmoin 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



The wide field covered by the V 
F. of L. is shown by the organiza- 
tion of rag sorters in Tacoma, Wash. 

The Nashville, Tenn., street car 
company shows that all czars and 
kaisers do not live abroad. It has 
refused to negotiate a new agree- 
ment with its organized platform 
employes and these workers are now 
on strike. 

With workmen's compensation 
laws enacted to date in 43 States 
and in Alaska. Porto Rico and 
Hawaii, in addition to the model 
measure adopted by the Federal 
government for its half-million ci- 
vilian employes, rapid progress is 
being made toward providing indus- 
trial accident insurance at cost 
through State funds, according to a 
statement issued by the American 
\--.ociation for Labor Legislation. 
Association for Labor Legislation. 

Treat your strikebreakers kindly 
and occasionally give them a small 
present, is the advice of officers of 
the Tennessee Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation to officers of the Nashville 
Street Car Company, which is at- 
tempting to establish the non-union 
shop. Nashville business men are 
urged to also pat the strikebreakers 
"ii the back and to assure these "in- 
dependent" workers that their fight 
for. non-unionism is appreciated b) 
every low wage employer in this 
city. 

In a speech to trade unionists in 
Chattanooga, Tenn.. Secretary-Treas- 
urer Birthwrisht of the Tennessee 
State Federation of Labor declared 
that big business was lined-Up 
against the woman's suffrage amend- 
ment, which was adopted by the Ten- 
nessee Legislature. He said the Ten- 
nessee Manufacturers' Association, 
the Louisville & Nashville Railroad 
and all other forms of privilege were 
on band to force rejection of the 
amendment by the same methods 
that they always used in opposing 
labor legislation. 

Clarence B. Miller, secretary of tin- 
Republican Committee, was scored 
by the Convention of National Fed- 
eration of Federal Employes. Mr. 
Miller advanced a wondrous scheme 
in Washington a few days ago to 
reduce the cost of living by having 
the government dismiss 300,000 em- 
ployes. In their resolution the 
unionists said: "The dismissal of 
.WO.000 employes other than postal 
employes would leave but 40.000 em- 
ployes for the entire federal service 
throughout the United States." Some 
of the delegates advised tin- politi 
cian to look for monopolists — if such 
a course would not affect contribu- 
tions to the campaign fund. 

Several thousand youngsters from 
the steel district of South Chicago 
were recently entertained by the 
"good fellow club" of the Illinois 
Steel Company, and Editor Tracy of 
the Union Clay Workers recalls that 
this club or its president, who is 
superintendent of the steel mills, did 
not arrange any picnics for these 
children when their fathers were on 
strike a few months ago to secure 
improved conditions. "Thk corpora- 
tion." says Editor Tracy, "had hun- 
dreds of thugs and gun men on the 
job ready to shoot down the striking 
steel workers on the slightest provo- 
cation, but that was during the 
strike when they were forced to 
show their hand. Now that the 
strike is over, they ride and dine the 
children of these same strikers." 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
.luring that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 

Abolin, K. Andersen, O. -1339 



E. A. 



J. F. 



Andersen, 

-1410 
Andersen, 
Andersen, C. D. 

-1131 
Baskes, Jack 
Anderson, Karl A. 
Anderson, Gui 
Anderson, K. P. 
Anderson, H. 
Anderson. Jack 

Back, Soren 
Raumgartel, A. 
Backstrom, C. 
Barentes, Joe 
Ballah, Lee 
Berg, H. J. 
Berglund, Iver 
Barring-ton, P. 
Berger, Aug. 
Belmont, Joe 
Bergkvlst, Axel 
Bergesen, Blrger 

Carlson, M. -90S 
Carr, A. 

Campbell, John R. 
Chrlstensen, E. O. 

H. 
Danieisen, O. B. 
Degerstedt, Karl 
Devlch, Joseph 
Donovan, J. J. 
Donnelly, R. A. 

Rdin, Gust 
Engberg, O. L. 
Bngvall, J. A. 

Eelsch, Chas. 
Fernandez, Ellsio 
Fex. Andrew 
Framnes, Ivar 
Gabrielsen, Peder 
Gaughan. Tom 
Gran, Aksel 
Gravander. Nils 
Greighan, P. 

Hansen, S. P. -2794 
Hansen, Nels -2072 
Hansen, Ed. 
Hansen, Edgar 
Hansen, Oscar 
Harms, E. E. 
Haltnes, M. 
Hansen, Frank 

Jonas, H. A. 
Johnson, Jack 
.Tohanson, C. 
Johnson, Clarence 

A. 
Jacobs, Fulton 
Johnson, B. E. 
Johnson, J. 
Johnson, Harry 
Kallo, K. 
Karlson, Ingvald 
Karlson, G. A. -1190 
Karlson, Louis 
Kasklnan, Allurl 
Kalllnan, Frank 
K. N., -1013 
Kempsen, M. 
Kearney, Hugh 
Kerton, Lester 
Lampe, Fred 
Larsen, Lars 
Lambert, E. A. 
Larsen, Herman 
Lauritsen, Ludvlg 
Langman, Wm. 
Leason, J. A. 
Lllquest, Rudolf 
Martlnsen, Ingvald 
Mattson, Hildlng 
Maline, Stanley 
McLean, Angus 
McVtcar. P. 
Meyer, Frank 
Mlckelson, Harry 
Micklans, J. 
McPherson, R. 
McDonald, J. 
Nelsen, Anton 
Nelsen. H. -14«0 
Nelson, A. 6. 
Nelson, N. J. 
Nellson, O. 
Ob erg, J. 
Ohm, Henrlch 
Olsen, Fred A. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, E. O. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, Nick 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, K. M. 
Pettersen, Eric 
Pettersen, Kristlan 
Petersen, BJarne 
Peterson, Oscar 
Ricnard««n, J. W. 
Richardson, E C. 
Rod, S. 
Ruhr. Hans 
Sale, John 
Saarni, Frank 
Salvesen, T. 
Samuelsen, H. N. 
Schurr, Harm 
Schelenz, C. 
Scott, W. N. 
Sickman, A. 
Slnnla, Q. 
Slmonsen, I. 
Slmondsen. H 



Anderson, J. -555 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, Chris 
Anderson, G. N. B. 
Andersen, Adrian 
Andersen, B. E. 
Anderson, Hllmer 
Alonzo, N. 
Axelsen, Herman 
Axelsen, George 

Bendlxon, Hans 
Berntsen, Nils 
Bingham, Dexter 
Blomgren, Adolf 
Blindheim, A. E. 
Blomgren, Carl 
Boyle, Andrew 
Bretsen, Jos. 
Brown, H. 
Brown, Martin 
Braun, T. 
Bunden, L. W. 

Chekan, W. 
Clifford, H. W. 
Clair, A. 
Clark, Sterling 

Dunham, Dexter 
Duncan, T. W. 
Dunne, F. 
Dutton, Henry 

Erlkson, Elner 
Erlkson, E. -S8 

Franzell, A. 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
Ferslund, Victor 

Graham, E. 
Gragan, J. H. 
Gutisen, J. H. 
Gustafsen, Oscar 
Gusjaas, Oscar 

Hansen, Immanuel 
Helmer, Fred 
Herlitz, Ivor 
Hlckka. E. J. 
Hasselberg, Gustaf 
Hape, Hans 
Hoopes, Bill 
Hahnqvlst, E. J. 

Johnson, Gatterd 
Johnson, Chris 
Johansen, O. 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, John S. 
Jensen, V. J. 
Jorgensen, Adrian 
Jorgensen. D. 
Julisen, C. A. 
Keane, John 
Klsor, Adlal 
Kellv. John 
Klahn. Karl 
Klenk, K. A. 
Koppen, O. 
Kristensen. N., 1093 
Krlstensen, K. 
Knkes, Conrad 
Kuten, Alex. 
Lindholm, A. 
Llndstrom. Geo. 
Lilburger, Wm. 
Linne. Theodore 
Lokken, O. K. 
Lundgren, Carl 
Lund, Erik 
Lynch, J. P. 
McCoy, J. L. 
McKenzle, Dan. 
Miller, S. 
Monrad, Trygue 
Molurg, K. G. E. 
Monroe, N. S. 
Mosley, S. E. 
Murphy, Thos. 
Muler, James 

Nelsen, Oscar 
Newman, J. S. 
Nielsen, C. L. 
Norshelm, Ben 
Nordstrom, A. R. 
Olsen, Louis 
Olsen, O. -697 
Odella, V. 
Olsen. Kristlan 
Olsson, K. W. -972 
Owens, James 
O'Donnell. J. 
Person, Johan 
Peel. P. 

Peterson, John E. 
Plnerd, F. H. 
Pipior.e, J. 
Prlnz, Carl 
Runsten, Arthur 
Rylander, R. 
Rysoek. M. van 

Smith, C. J. 
Smeland, John 
Sommerfeld, P. L. 
Sohnn, M. 
Soroos, S. 
Sobel, R. 
Sterndoch, J. 
Strand, C. 
Stuhr, H. M. 
Svenson, Thure 
Bverdrup. Walter 



Sjoberg, G. 
Slandart, M. 
Talce, John 
Tangvalt, G. J. 
Thornqulst, A. 
Unwen, Harry 
Verst, C. A. 
Ward, Fred 
Watson, L. 
Wall, W. 
Whete, R. E. 
Williams, L. A. 
Wilhelmsen, S. 



Symons, W. A. 

Thorn, Arvid 
Thor, L. 
Thorpe, J. W. 
Vilen, I. 
Vaher, C. 
Wilhelmsen, S. 
Wilson, C. 
Wright, H. 
White, R. E. 
Ylonen, S. 
J. Torkvelt, A. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List 



Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, John 

(registered) 
Anderson, E. F. 

(registered) 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, Andrew 
Rrandt, H. 
Berke, C. 
Barton, M. 
Brun, Mattias 
Bedford, A. 
Bradsbery, Geo. 
Carlson, Oscar 
Forsman, Niels 
Hansen, Johan G. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hanson, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Hans 



Janson, John 
Johanesen, Alf. 
Johnson, Karl 
Johannesen, Jonas 
Johanson, Emil 
Jorgensen, Jack 
Kepper, Henry 
Kinnunnen, Ant. 
Olsen, Alf 
Petersen, Hans 
Roneld, P. 
Randmets, Mike 
Rlsenius, Sven 
Saro, W. R. 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Toren, Gustaf 
Tourela, Brick 
Vejvorda, Frank 
Wattel, P. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Alaska Fishermen 's Letter List 

Andersen, Oscar McNeill, Daniel 



Anderson, Hildlng 
A. L. N. 
Bakinen, John 
BJorseth, Konrad 
Carlson, Gust 
de Blom, A. 
Ericson. Rob 
Krickson. John 
Groth, J. 
Hansen, Emanuel 
Hansen, Anton 
Hakanson. Ingvar 
Isakson, Erick 
Jacobsen, Jack 
Johansen, F. C. 



Ross 
Moxnes, Chris. 
Mikelse-n, P. 
Newton, A. B. 
Olofson, Charles 
Osterman. John 
Olsen, Thorn 
Olsen, John 
Ome, Tobias 
Olsen, George 
Peterson. Frank 
Raamussen. Peter 
Skovba, Nils 
Shivers, Witt. 
Svenson, August 



Johansen. Karl W. Schultz, Walter 

Johnson, John Tennison, Peter 

Karlson. George Wamsa, August 
Kjerdalen, Ole Peter 

Krlstoffersen. H. O. Registered Letters 

Le8ktnen, Fred CranzzI, Rosollno 

Levele, Ed. Meyer. Hans 

Lindeberg. Ernest Mittenmeyer, J. 

Lauren, 'William Rasmussen, P. 

Lund, Frank Smith. R. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of John B. Isaacs will please notify 
Chas. F. Bullock, Marine Cooks' and 
Stewards' Association, 321 Twentieth 
street, Galveston, Texas. Matter of 
great importance. 3-31-20 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Porter" are requested to call at the 
Secretary's office for their vouchers 
for salvage services rendered to 
S. S. "Washington" on or about 
November 5, 1919. The vouchers are 
issued to the following members, 
and the respective amounts due 
thereon is as follows: 

Amudsen, R $22.50 

Eugene, John 22.50 

Makinen, K 22.50 

Mattson, Geo. J 22.50 

Rehnstrom, A 26.25 

Sjoholm, J. W 22.50 



Any one knowing the nearest rela- 
tives of C. C. Stewart, a late member 
of the Marine Firemen's Union of 
the Atlantic, are kindly requested to 
communicate with the Secretary of 
the above organization at 70 South 
St., New York. N. Y. 3-3-20 



Rudolf Knutsson is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of h.s 
brother. J. Harvid Knutsson, a na- 
tive of Trellerborg, Sweden, age 
20, last heard from in New York, 
in April, 1918. Please address his 
brother, rare Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, 59 Clay street, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 1-7-20 



Albert Nord, a native of Sweden 
is inquired for by his brother. David 
Nord, General Postoffice. Brisbane. 
Australia 5-19-20 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHER, FURNISHER &. HATTEI 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium in 

Connection 
Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1S90 

MENS CLOTHING, SHOES, HATI 

and FURNICHING GOODS 

108-110 Main Street Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Seamen's Outfitters 
C. P. Salmi & Co. 

Men's Furnishings 

Shoes, Hats and Oiled Clothing 

411 EAST HERON STREET 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HAT8, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 
EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts.. Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of Karl Reese, age 30, last heard of 
in Iquique, Chile, October, 1916, bark 
Herbert," will please notify George 
Zimera, Sailors' Union, P. O. Box 
65. Seattle, Wash. 1-21-20 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Domlnguez. Joseph 
Grnnlunrl, Oscar 
Johnson, John 
Kuhlmann Emil 
Mnttsmi, Wnlter 
Melgall. Mlkel 
Person, Fritz, 

Leonard 
Rnlnhard. H 



Reilly, Ralnh 

Rydellus, Rnl|. 
Shumko. Nlrk 
Smith. John 
Smith. Cart. Johan 
Svanson. Harold 
Swanson. H. -1216 
Thaysen, Arthur 
Thompson, T. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Ahren, Wm. 
Andersen, A. C. 
Andersson, Axel 
Andersson, Carl 
Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson, J. A. 
Anderson, Ed. 
Anderson, Gunnar 
Andersson, Bill 
Anderson, Herman 
Anderson, Carl E. 
Austin, Ed. 
Amundsen, Ben 
Alakaihn, Moses 
Allen, I. J. 
Alsic, Karl 
Bach, Soren 
Backman, Peter 
Bieler, Ben 
Blake, Frank 
Bohm, Gust 
Bohm, Franz 
Carmelie, Guiseppe 
Custer, Kenneth R. 
Oanilson. Alhtn 
Darlington, Wm. 
Davison, Jim 
Oiez. H. 

Dooly, Frank E. 
Douglas, Joseph 
Durett, J. EJ. 
Erlckson, J. 
Erickson, Hans E. 
Ellegard, M. 
Engler, S. H. 
En berg, Elnar 
Fogelberry, Harry 
Forsberg, Swen 8. 
Fugman, Arthur 
'Jilkison, A. F. 
Golden, Roy L,. 
Graft, John D. 
Gronheck, H. 
Gruber, J. 
Halley, W. 
Hanson, August 
Hanson, Oskar W. 
Hardie, Wallace 
Hnestrom. Karl I. 
Hoiland, E. A. 
Helno. Gust 
Henrlkson, Geo. 
Huher. Charles S. 
Hurley, Michael 
Irmey, Feodor 
Jacobs. Fulton 
Jernberg, Alfred 
Jespersen, Martin 
Johnson. Emil 
Johanson, S. 
Johnson. Louis 
Jones, E. L. 
Kalfholm, Edw. 
Kauko, Axel 
Kelly, Norman 
Kennedy, B. L. 
Kjellberg, A. C. 
Klaver, R. 
Krause, Frank 
Kristiansen. Wm. A 



Laine. A A 

Lalne, John 

Larsen, Hans 

Larsson, Ragnar 

Larson, C. J. -1632 

Lelsig. John 

Lindner, John P. 

Lovell, G. 

Lundgren. Gust 

Malech, Frank E. 

Malkoff, Peter 

Matson, R. M. 

McCroskey, Ray A. 

McGregor. Thos. 

McLeod, Angus 

McLean, M. R. 

Mikkelsen. Harry 

Moyer, Geo. E. 

Neilsen, H. J. 

Nelson, Nels 

Nelsson, C. 

Neuling. G. A. 

Nilsen. Christ 

Norberg, John E. 

Olsen, Michael 

Olson, T. 

Olson, John 

Pederson, Geo. 

Peterson, Mauritz 

Petersen. Knut 

Pehte, Frank L. 

Preston. E. 

Pyne, J. W. 

Raanes, Johan 

Rader, Allen 

Rautlo, Jack 

Reiman, Tovo H. 

Rier, Earl W. 

Robertson, E. J. 

Robles, Frank 

Ross, Geo. 

Salne, Arthur A. 

Salonen, Victor 

Salln, Toivo H. 

Sandvlk, S. G. 

Scott, M. 
Shalin, Nils 

Sibley, M. 
Sinclair, P. 

Smith, Carl J. 
Slade, I. S. 

Spencer. Tom 
Stout, R. E. 
Sutse. Michel 
Svansson, Ernest 
Taylor, Bert 
Thomson, Henry 
Thorsen, Chas. 
Tinstrom, A. R. 
Tuhkanen, John J. 
Walmough, P. 
Walter, E. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Wikstrom, Carl 
Willis, Samuel 
Wood. E. E. 
Wolf, Herbert 
Walters, Fred L. 
Worn, Otje 



San Pedro Letter List 



Aho, Jack 
Andersen, J. -2157 
Anderson, C. 
Andersen, C. 
Anderson, Sven 
Arentsen, John 
Arnesen leak 
Aspe, Theodor 
Belmont, Joe 
Bentley, Clifford 
Bengtsson, Slgfrled 
Bergeson, B. 
Berglund, Emil J. 
Bergsirom. J 
Brast. Sjomans 
Braden, W. A. 
Beschorner. Robert 
Brown, Irving W. 
Bye, Kristian 
Burge, Larence 
Cage, Tom 
Carlsson, Chas. 
Carlera. P»ter 
Carr, R. W. 
Craig, Thomas 
Cowan, Wm. L. 
Church. C. E. 
Havls. Orvillo 
Daw, Walter 
Deaver. Alvl" 
Desmond,, Albin 
Doty, Erwin 
Daunt, C. 
Dreger, Jack 
Dragich, Peter 
Drennan, v\ . N. 
Eliasen, John 
Fk. William 
England. Thomas 
Evans, Wllbert 
Evensen, Alex 
Farrell. H. D. 
Feeder, Geo. 
Fickle Omer 
Fottinger, Karl A. 
Folvlk, Ludvig 
Fnrde. Alfred 
Frair, Enoch 
Freiberg, P. 
Franzell, A. H. 
Kreitag, F. 
Gayton, H. L. 
Cra.onnn Joe 
Gronthal. Arthur 
Golden, Roy 
Uuihiciuu. Lflrlk 
Hnnaon n'^f 
Hellsten, G. 



Hermanson, Carl 
Holland, Jonnie 
Hermanson, Carl 
Hey. Ben. 
Hickey, John 
Hogstedt, Chas. 
Houston, Robert 
Hurley, Michael 
Jacobsen, Jack -24-15 
Jacobsen, Tom 
Janofy, Axel 
Jensen, Marius 
Jensen, Kristian 
Jeeden, George 
Johnson, Carl E. 
Johansen, Anton 
Johansen, Johan W. 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen, J. -1432 
Johnson. Georg« 
Johansen, J. -2314 
Johnson, P. -2313 
Johnson, Waldron 
Jonassen. Johannes 
Keel. Jewell 
Kelty. Peter 
Kenrich, Richard 
Ketelsen, break. 
Keegan, J . 
Klieman, Otto 
Klementsen, Alf 
Kootz, Fred 
Knudsen Andrew 
Kruse, Henry 
Ki istoffersen, Hans 
l.aine John 
Landborg. Chas. 
Larsen, Johan -1542 
Lauritzen, Ole 
Levine. Carl 
Lindholm, Chas. 
Lill. Karl 
Lind, Gustav 
Llndstrom, John 
Llndeberg. Ernest 
Lowrey, John R. 
Lodersen, John 
Lorgeman. Fred 
Lobeles, Jose 
Lund, F. V. -2010 
Lucander, Hjalmar 
Maana vv Hl> 
Magnussen, John 
Martinson J.-2«47 
Mato. Alexander 
McNeill. John 
McGhee, E. J 
McRae. Jack 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 
SUITS AND A11 , , 

OVERCOATS Established AU W ° rk d ° ne m 

to Order at Popular for 20 years our own sanitar y 

Prices workshop 

Represented by £ P£GUILLAN 



Books for You 
While at Sea 

ADVENTURE — SEAMANSHIP 
ROMANCE— HISTORY— TRAVEL 
SCIENCE— GREAT MEN'S LIVES 

Books to Help You Spend Idle Hours in a 
Pleasant and Worth While Way 

For a Free Crew's Library 
Exchangeable at Any Time 

Apply to 

American Library Association 



34 Sacramento Street 



San Francisco 



Phone Sutter 6985 

Or to other A. L. A. Agencies in Almost Any American Port 

These books are provided free for your use by the people 
of the United States through the American Library Association. 

When you have finished with them, they may be exchanged 
for another collection at any office of the American Library 
Association, or they may be exchanged for any A. L. A. collection 
on board another boat. 

In fairness to the men on the next ship receiving this collection 
you should take reasonable care to prevent loss or damage to 
any book. 



Mize, J. H. 
Mehrtens, Carl 
Moor, Peter 
Monson, Edvin 
Moritz, W. 
Murphy, Francis J. 
Nauta. H. 
Nnnkinen. Fred 
Nelson. Ernest 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nelson. Oils 
Nilsson, Edward 
Ogren, Victor E. 
Olofsen, O. A. 
Olsen, Ole 
Olsen. Harold 
Olcson. Otto 
Pett, Dick 
Petersen, Huso 
Peterson, August 
Raaum. Harry 
Rasmnssen Swend 
Roberts, Bob 
Roberts, J. W. 
Robertson, E. 
Robinson, Fred C. 
Rod. Halfdan 
Rossdam, Harry 

Rosenthal. M 

Rohman. Pete 
Runge, R. 
Rueter, Amandus 
SahU.erg. Rudolf 
Sanders, Chas. 
Sandberg. N. A. 
Saxby, Charles 
Sandstrom. O. H. 
Salln, Henry 
Schladen, H. 
Scaharrv. Jacoh 
Schaumberg, W. 
Scottol, Andrew 



Scrivers, W. 
Seland, Hans 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Soder, Paul 
Strehle. F. 
Strauss. "Walter 
Steen, Ivar 
Stensland. Paul 
Strom, Oscar 
Stenberg, Alfred 
Sterndock, John 
Steffensen, Hans 
Sundquist, Walter 
Sunde, O. 
Sullivan. Jack 
Swindells, William 
Swanson, Mr. 
Swanson, Eric K. 
Thomsen, Thomas 
Treiberg, Peter 
Veckenstedt, W. 
Vlscarra, Oscar 
Voth, Gus 
Wennerouist. Anfon 
Wilhelmson, Karl 
Winkelman, Otto 
Wilson, John 
Woods, Claude F. 
Wrohluvskl, Paul 
Zimmerman, Fritz 
Zunde'T. Theo. 
Packages 
Hansen. Oscar W. 
Nahinen, Fred 
Roberson, Ole 
Erickson, E. R. 
Nanhinen, Fred. 
Peters. J. M 
Pinnington. H. D. 
Young, Williarr 
Zoerb, Walter 



INFORMATION WANTED 



The Centrale Bond von Trans- 
portarbeiders have placed in my 
hands claim of the father and 
mother of L. Verhoef, seaman who 
met his death on the S. S. "Balosaro" 
April 29, 1920. An old spring line 
broke, curled around Verhoef's left 
leg and yanked him on to the winch 
while he was operating it. Before 
it could be stopped his leg was taken 
off. He died two hours later at the 
hospital. Will members of the crew 
please report here promptly. The 
master has made an entry in the log 
book to the effect that the deceased 
met with his death through intoxi- 
cation, which statement we believe 
to be utterly false. I am acting for 
the dependent relatives. It is the 
duty of seamen to tell the truth. 
Your dependents may be in the same 
position some day. — S. B, Axtell. 

8-25-20 



Home News 



California shipped 46,757 carloads 
of citrus fruits, valued at $81,200,000, 
in the season just ended, according 
to the report of G. Harold Powell, 
general manager of the California 
Fruit Growers' Exchange, rendered 
to the directors of that organization 
at their annual meeting. 

Congressman John J. Esch, Repub- 
lican, one of the authors of the 
Esch-Cuminins railway bill, was de- 
feated for renomination in the pri- 
mary in the seventh district of Wis- 
consin by Joseph E. Beck, former 
State Commissioner of Labor. 
Esch's managers . onceded Beck's 
nomination. Beck was supported by 
Senator La Follette. 

The Colorado Bar Association will 
urge the next Colorado Legislature 
to establish cossacks in that State. 
The lawyers say that recent riots in 
connection with the local street car 
strike would be impossible if cos- 
sacks were on the job. The bar as- 
sociation makes no mention of the 
imported thugs and strikebreakers 
who staged the riots. Neither do 
the lawyers comment on the policy 
of certain local newspapers that 
create a mob spirit which was capi- 
talized by the thugs. 

Spirituous liquors received their 
final and complete divorce from the 
United States Navy in an order 
made public by the Bureau of Medi- 
cine and Surgery prohibiting their 
issue to naval vessels for medicinal 
purposes. Not only are medical sup- 
ply depots prohibited from issuing 
whisky except to hospitals, but when 
their present supplies have become 
exhausted, the order states, "no fur- 
ther purchases will be made and 
whisky will be stricken from the 
supply table of the medical depart- 
men of the Navy." Tt is estimated 
that the supply on hand will last not 
more than two or three weeks. 

Coal owners in Mercer and Mc- 
Dowell counties, West Virginia, have 
failed to stop the unionization of 
their employes by thugs and ma- 
chine guns and now call on the court 
to protect their "yellow dog" con- 
tracts. Miners are compelled to sign 
these contracts before they are em- 
ployed. The contracts provide that 
the miner shall not join a union 
while in the company's employ. As 
the miner is miles from any other 
employment, and in most cases has 
a wife and family, he is compelled 
to waive his rights as a citizen. This 
contract has been sustained by the 
United States Supreme Court. 

A mysterious explosion in Wall 
Street, New York, believed by De- 
partment of Justice and police to 
have been caused by an infernal 
machine, rocked the heart of New- 
York's financial district at noon on 
September 16, leaving death and 
destruction in its wake. At least 31 
persons were killed, more than 200 
were injured, the banking house of 
J. P. Morgan & Co., the Sub 
treasury and the Assay Office were 
partially wrecked and property dam 
age estimated in excess of $1,000,000 
was caused. Thomas W. I.amont 
of the J. P. Morgan firm, expressed 
the belief, however, that the e\ 
plosion was purely an accident 
caused by a collision between an 
explosive-laden wagon and another 
vehicle. The firm had received no 
threats of any kind he said, and 
there was no real reason for the 
planting of a bomb outside the firm's 
office. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



« i 


Domestic and Naval 


♦ * 



Mexican laborers in Dallas. Texas, 
have become weary of exploitation 
and have organized. 

A co-operative cigar factory which 
will sell its products by mail order 
to union customers has just been 
opened under the direction of the 
Union Cigarmakers' Co-operative So- 
ciety of New York. The venture 
has been incorporated for $20,000 
and will have a capacity for fifty 
workers, who will be chosen by lot 
from among the members of the 
society, all of whom are union mem- 
bers. 

Organized Washington timber 
workers employed by the National 
Lumber Company defeated an at- 
tempt to Change the eight-hour clay 
to 10 hours. Some members of the 
company's "union," known as the 
Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lum- 
bermen, joined the strike. After the 
bona fide unionists saved the eight- 
hour day Loyal Legion officers con- 
demned the company. Then the com- 
pany admitted its "mistake." 

A 44-hour week is one feature of 
an agreement between metal trades 
workers and contract shops in Sa- 
vannah, Ga. Wages are advanced 10 
cents an hour, or to an hourly mini- 
mum of $1, for mechanics. Appren- 
tices covered by the agreement will 
be paid 40 cents an hour to start 
with, and an additional 5 cents an 
hour every six months until the com- 
pletion of apprenticeship. 

The Washington state safety board 
in attempting to reduce the number 
of accidents in the building industry 
in this state which totaled, last year, 
388 non-fatal and 83 fatal accidents. 
In a circular to the various affili- 
ates of organized labor, Martin J. 
Flyzik of the State board, announces 
the issuance of general safety stand- 
ards and urges all workers and em- 
ployers to become acquainted with 
these rules. 

Co-operatives in Tucson, Ariz., 
have bought a drug store for $10,000 
and have added another link to their 
intended chain of stores. The co-op. 
movement is backed by organized 
labor and now conducts a first-class 
grocery store and drug store. The 
co-ops. declare their dream for a 
bank, a clothing house, butcher shop 
and a restaurant will come true. 
Opponents of the co-ops. still insist 
"it can't be done." 

The Actors' Equity Association has 
secured a contract from the Tour- 
ing Managers' Association which as- 
sures the actors many of the con- 
ditions prevailing in theaters in New 
York. The Touring Managers' As- 
sociation is composed mainly of pro- 
ducers who send one-night attrac- 
tions on the road. The Actors' 
Equity Association includes some of 
America's leading stage stars and i- 
affiliated with the A. F. of L. 

Through a misunderstanding of a 
decree issued by Judge Augustus 
Hand in the Federal District Court 
of New York in the matter of money 
awarded the crew of the steamer 
"Westmoreland," which salved the 
U. S. Shipping Board vessel "Mul- 
pua," it was stated that $40,956 was 
to be divided among the crew. S. B. 
Axtell, No. 9 State street, attorney 
for a majority of the crew, informs 
the Journal that the decree appor- 
tions only one-fifth of that sum, or 
$8,191, to the crew. The owners, he 
states, gets the balance. Mr. Axtell 
had asked for one-fourth. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH .Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 

Deposits 63,352,269.17 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,488,107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund 330,951.36 

OFFICERS 
JOHN A. BUCK, President 
GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 
E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 
A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOiTSE, Assistant Secretary 
WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 
G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch 
W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 
O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

E. A. CHRISTENSON L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys 



San Francisco Letter List 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at mice notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manger, The 
ten's Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 

Union Oil i advertised for three 

months only and will be returned to the 

Office at the expiration of four 

months from the date of delivery. 

Aagaard, A. M. Eckleberry, H. 
Adolfsson, John Eide, B. 

Almon, L. Eide, W. 

Altonen, Carl Eisenhardt, K. 

Andersen, O. -2099 Ellingsen, Harold 
Andersen, Chas. Ellis. I 



Theo. 
Andersen, N. F. 
Andreasen, H. 

1477 
Anderson, A. G. 

-2440 
Andersson, Edvln 

£nHp™ F r anl £o01 Farrell.-Bernand 
1 Fletcher, Jos. 
Freese, Paul 
Fredricksen. O. 



Bngstrom, Ed. 

Endemann, M. 
Ennus, Plto 
Ertckson, -997 
Ernst. E. 

Fagerberg, Ivan 
Farevoog, C. M. 



Andersson, G. A. 
Andersson, G. S. 
Anderson, John 
Andersson, C. 
-797 
Arzziro. Geo. N. 
Aso, Gustav 



l'bach, C. 
Fuller, Geo. E. 



R. B. 



Gallery 
^^^^""riaronfoGajTior, Ambrose 
Augus e tin^H ClarenCe,:let " ek >- " a 



Aylward, Ja 



Baggs, H. L. 
Baggs, Morris 
Bandel, Curt 
Bang, Hugo 
Baptiste, Lawr. 
Baris, N. 
Barlow, R. 
Bendixen, Hans 
an, J. L. 
Bergstrom, G. A. , 
Beschorner, Robert S2S™ e ??^ P < * u " 
Bjorklund, E. 
Blomgren, C. A. 
Blomgreen, A. 
Bloom, Pete 



Hans 
Germenis, Socrates 
Graham, Claude 
Graham, Ray 
Grainge, Arnold 
Granberg, Fred 
Gregory, M. N. 
Green, Lawrence 
Griffin, J. R. 
Gunderson, H. T. 
Gutmann, Paul •„. 
M. -11SI 



Boerner, P. F. 
Bolstad. Hans 
Bond. H. J. 
Borgeson, Hildlng 
Botsiord, R. D. 
Boyland, O. J. 
Bourman, Jack 
Brauner, C. A^. 
Broomhead, A. 
Broshear, A. O. 
Brown, H. W. 
Bryning, Wm. 
Bryning, Walter 



Hagen, Horace 
Haider, Henry 
Hale, Klngsley 
Hallit, Frank 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Hallowes, L. X. 
Haka, Ed. 
Hansen. -2010 
Hansen, -3190 
Haugen, H. C. 
Hammond. Robert 
Hangers, H. -1980 
Handley, Chas. 
Hansen, Hans M. 
Hansen, H. F. 
Hansen, Harold 
Hansen, S. P. 
Hanson, Olaf 



Buckner, Chas. W.Harbst, J. D 



Bye, Krist. 

Callahan, Patrick 
Carlsen, Sverre 
Carlson, John 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, G. -776 
Carlson, Peter 
Carlsson, J. 



Harvey, Earl S. 
Hauptman, F. 
Hawkins, L. 
Hellsten. G. A. 
Hennlques, L. O. 
Hessin, B. 
Heaps, James 
Hereld. J. M. 
Heyen, Horace 



Carlsson, John -861 Heywood, D. L. 
Carpenter, Harold Higgins, P. 
Cavanaugh, H. E. Hobbs, Frank A. 
Chilcott, Geo. Houlak. John 

Chavez. Mariano Hobbs, Frank M. 
Christensen, Jorgen Hoglander, Martin 

-1731 Hollkamp, C. 

Christensen. Martin Holdaway, C. G. 
Cherry, Arthur Hood, Alex 

Chipps, Eric Huter, Chas. 

Christensen, H. C. 



Clausen, Louis 
Clug, Fredrick 
Cobb, Ralph H. 
Colman, J. 
Conley, Irwin 
Cooper, C. E. 
Coulyou, Joseph 
Culman, F. 

Dahl Otto 
Dahl, Oskar 
Dahls, Ogden 



Huber, C. L. -2846 
Hunter, Ernest 

Ibsen, Christian 
Ireland. H. 
Isakson. Karl 

Jacklin, Charles 
Jacobsen, E. Th. 
Jacobsen. Herman 
Jahnke. Paul 
Jakullis. John 
Janson, John A. 



Dahlgren, Wm. A. Jansson, HJ. 



Davis. Warren 
Daunt, C. 
Delsing, Ernst 
DeMario, Thos 
Delaney, G. 
Derberg, M. 
Dickensen, T. 
Domminell. G. 
Domke, Willi 



Jansson. John 
Jens, Otto 
Jensen, Martin 
Jensen, E. -1987 
Jenson, Jens 
Jensen, Klaus 
Jensen, A. J. -2708 
Jernberg, Alf. 
Jeppsen, Chris. 



Donnelly, George F.Jespersen, M. 



Drange, F. S. 
Drennen, W. N. 
Dommelen, G. J. 
Duarte, John 
Duis, John 
Dumas, C. 
Dunwoody, G. 

Eaton, Lawrence 



Jewell, Al. M. 
ilohannesen, Ole 
Johanssen. Klaus 
Johansen, Ellert 
Johannesen, Johan- 
nes 
Johansen, Anton 
Johnsen, H. -2213 
Johnston, Edw. 



Johanson, E. -2715 McLean, Grant 
Johnson. A. Emil McCoy, J. L. -2904 
Johnson, Carl -2783 McEvoy, Peter 
Johnson, E. L. MeCallum, Chas. 

Johansson, Uernad McClintic, Frost 
Johnson, Walter MeCarthy, Harood 
Joiner, McManus, Peter 

Jonsson, J. H. -2951Maland, Helge 
Jorgensen, Johannes Mattos, M. D. 
Jorgensen, F. Markman, Hy. 

Josepnson, Ben Maynard, Q. 

Joyce, Daniel Mersman. A. 

Judd. Jack Mess, W. 

Jungstrom, William Alelgand, Ricard 

Meyers, J. E. 
Kaaveland, T. Mitchell, David 

-641 Mldgelle, F.ank W. 

Karlsson, IS. -17;iS Mikelsen. Bern. 
Karlsson, Gustaf Miller, R. E 



Kasperson, E. 
Katkln, Ed. 
Kessell, Harry 
Keegan, Joe 
Kierne, G. H. 
Klhlman, Gunnar 
Kine, Conrad 
Ivinnie, E. J. 
Kirby, Geo. 
Klemmetsen. Alf. 
Kluge, Fred 
Kluge, Martin 
Knudsen, Ragnval 
Knutsen, B. R. 
Kolustow, A. 
Kraal, J. 



Moberg, Alf. 
Mool. Peter 
Mohr, Karl 
Monroe, N. S. 
Monsen, Charlie 
Mol. J. W. 
Moller, Fritz 
Moonan, Thomas 
Morgan, R. B. 
Mortensen, Geo. 
Moritz, \V. 
Morris. Francis 
Moore, H. L. 
Morris, Jimmie 
Morrison, Donald 
Moulas. Nicholas 



Kristofterson, A. B. Mailer, Werner 



Kruse, Elnar 
Kuckens, B. 

La Madrid. R. 
Lambert, Jos. ' 
Lange, Henry 
Langmann, Wm. 
Lanphear, D. 
Larsen, Alfred 

i. 11. -2280 



Nannestad, Arthur 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, Jerome 
Nelson, Nils E. 
Nelson, Steve 
Nelson, C. -302 
Nelson, C. R. 
Nesson. Ralph 
Neumann, H. 4123 
Neveau, Thomas 



Larsen, Slgruid 

Larsen. John ^O^f" 1 ™' A ; phmip 



ace, Bruno 

Leegaard, Rasmus 
Letter, John A. 
Lehtonen, HJ. O. 
Leskinen, F. A. 
Lidsten. Chas. 
Liesen, W. 
Llndeberg, Ernst 
Lindgren, A. A. 
Lind. H. -2314 



Niklasson, Justus 
Nilsen, Martin L. 
Nilsson, Emil 
Nilsson, Edward 
Nielsen, Jens 
Nilsen, Hans L. 
Nilsson, John 
Nilsson, K. L. 
Nolen, 

Nord, Clarence W. 
Lindqutet, Chas. S. 5°!*?^ S"° 
Lindroos, Fred «SS;? a f 

r iiiorini j i„k- Nordenberg, Alf. 

toning" Herman Nortg'en, Ragnar 
Lundquist. Ralph A. 5°n"und. Albert 
i.nii,.,k- Thr, s North. Jesse I. 



801 



Lubeck, Thos. 
Lundin. -105 ! 

Lundstrom, Ernst 

Lydersen, Peder 

Maalo, Rasmus 

MacLeod, Norman 

Macauley, D. 

Makares. S. J. 

Mannonen, Niels 

Manzano, Luis 

Marker, Andrew 

Marshall, Ira 

Martinsen, Ingvald Olseni Alf 

Mattos, Mario P. Olsen, C. -1412 



Nummelin, Arthur 
Nuter, Alex 

Oad, John 
O'Brien, Larry 
Ohlsson, Hj. 
Ogren, V. E. 
ry, Patric 
Olsen, Fred 
Olsen, Magnus 
Olsen, Ole 
Olsen, Svedrup B. 
Olsen, Wm. J. 



Page, J. N. 
Paksis, T. 
Parker, Bert 
Parrish, Arthur L. 
Pearson, Edw. 
Pedersen, Lewis 
Pedersen, L. M. 
Perrson, Albert 

Permin, Jen» 
Petersen, Axel L. 



Smith. W. 
Smith. John H. 
Smith, Geo. B. 

Smith, A. G. 

Solberg, Bernt P. 
Soneson. Wilhelm 
Sorensen, Jorgen H. 
Sovdsnes, O. Peter- 
sen 

Sonne. Herman 



Petersen, Bjarne A. Spence, O. L. 



Petersen, Jens 
Peterson, Henry 
Peterson. O. -1595 
Pilkinton, Homer 
Post, Albei t 
Potter, E. R. 
Price. Arthur 
Prusch. A. 
Publicatus, A. 
Punis, Tony 

Ramasse, Joe 
Ramos, Enrique 



Speckman, Max 
Spey. H. F. 
Stanford, Harry 
Stensland, Paul 
Sternisa, Carl 
Stout, R. E. 
Stragseth, Svend 
Strele. F. 
Strom. C. A. 
Strurh, O. 
Stang, A. 
Stenensen. A. 
Stewart, William 
Rasmusen, "kudolpf Stone, Wlcktor 
Rasmussen. Aksel Strandberg, O. 
Rasmussen, Emil Bund, Alex. 

Rasmussen, Karl V. Sundberg, K. C. 
Reese, Luois Inen, Oskar 

Richardson, Edwin Swaneon. C. 



Rillukka, John 
Rier, E. W. 
Rogers, Thos. G. 
Rollo, R. 
Rommel. Andrew 
Ronn, E. 
Rose, J. 
Ross. H. E. 
Rosenberg, L. 
Roth, M. 
Rubins, Ch. 
Rutter, Amandus 
Ryan, Patrick 



Swinka, Albert 



Tacle, John 
Tallaksen, Arthur 
Tandberg, Einar 
Takkis, John 
Taylor, Sam C. 
Toiiofson Kmll 
F. K. Thomas, Johnle 
Thomas, Nelson 
Thomasen, Olaf 
Thompson, Clifford 
Thomsen, Chr. 
_ Thorn, Arvld 
Saharoff. John Thomas. Frank 

Salli, Rudolf Thomas, Fred 

Sampson. C. L. Thomphson, James 

Sampson. Carl -2136 Thompson. J. W. 
Samuelson. E. -3888lillman, Chas. 
Sanne, Rudolf Timmers, H. P. 

Sanjer, Sajer Tingstrom. A. R. 

Saunders, Dewey A. Tjersland._Sverre 



Saxbv. C. II. 
Scanlon. David P. 
Schmees, Herman 
Schmidt, E. H. 



Tohtz, R. C. 
Torson. Andrew 
Touzel, R. 
Trykin, Gustaf 



Schneidau, Helnrich Tucker, Harold J. 
Schroeder. Ernst Tufty, C\_J. 



Schulze, John 
Selvert, Albert 

id. Rasmus 
Sexton, Harry J. 
Sharman. E. S. 
Sidou. Geo. 
Sidroff, Nick 
Sigrlst. George 
Simpson, Joseph H. 
Sinnes, K. E. 
Sjogren. Fred. 
Skaar, Oskar M. 
Skeries. Han? 
Slattery, Harry 
Small, E. R. 
Smedsvig, O. B. 
Smith, Jas. 



Turner, W. A. 

Vargas, Martina 
Vierr. W. 
Vltek, Edward 
Vitol, A. 
Wapper. John 
Ware. T. F. 
Waterman, J. K. 
Weber, C. W. 
West, Frank 
Whltesel. C. W. 
Wilks, J. 
Willmann, Wm. 
Wink, Peter 
Wittenburg, D. 
Woods, Dick 



PACKAGES. 



Allison, Ben 
Barlow, Robt. 
Blake, L. 
Booshard. H. 
Breeze, J. 
Churman, W. C. 
Corneliusen, M. 
Deu Free, E. 
Eads, Joe 
Bgan, John 
Engstrom, Edw. 
Frizzell. Riley 
Frey, Peter 
Ganser, Joe 
Garrick, J. B. 
Goodman, Tony 
Griffin, J. R. 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Henrikson, Ernst 
Hobbs, Frank A. 
Hoglander, M. 
Holmes, Geo. 
Jansonu, C. J. W. 
Johnson, John 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
Kallio, F. 



Ketelsen, Fred 
LaMadrid, Rafael 
Larsen, J. -2012 
Larson, Axel 
Lehto, Oscar 
Liljedal, L. 
Lindgren, E. 
Locke, J. E. 
Lundquist, Ralph 
Mathis. Hartley H. 
McPherson, R. 
Mortensen, K. A. 
Mortensen, Bjarne 
Navarrete, Joe 
Newman, L. O. 
Nordlund, Albert 
Pattersen, Frank 
Pederseh, Anders 
Sorensen, Jos. E. 
Sternica, Carl 
Stranberg, P. 
Tillsten, Jack 
Travers 

van Vleet, F. B. 
Wahtje, W. H. 
Wallin. V. O. 



Kalning, P. G. -134 2 Williams, J. D. 
INFORMATION WANTED 



Mahaffey, Cecil 
Mattson, Hildlng 
Mattson. Victor 
McGauley, Geo. 
n, Oliver 
McGregor, Donald 
McGlllvray, W. 
McKenzle, Alex. 



Olsen, Eugene 
Olson, Harald 
Olson, Ed. 
Onno, Tobias 
Ostlund, John 
Osborne, E. T. 
Osborne. James 
Ozolin, Jan 



Charles Bernard Wilson, born in 
Stevenson, Alabama, write or come 
to your mother, Flora M. Wilson, 
719 18th street, Oakland Cal., care 
-Mrs. J. Buck. 9-22-20 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 




FRANK M. NESTROY 

Phone Kearny 5361 THE ARGONAUT TAILORS UNION TAILOR 

We do Master Tailoring on Suits, Overcoats and Uni- 
forms for men who desire to dress and look superior. 
We carry the largest selection of imported and do- 
mestic woolens. Quality and workmanship guaranteed. 
MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 

268 MARKET STREET 

Conducted by Capt. Chas. Ehlers 

Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 






Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since Its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

300 Rooms at 50 cents per day, 
$2.50 to $3.00 per week, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN. Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 

THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



— Phones — 

Office, Fkln 7756 Residence, Rand 27 

Office Hours, 9:30 a. m. to 6 p. m. and 

7 to 8 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9:30 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

Liberty Bonds accepted in exchange for 

dental work 

2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Golden Gate 

and Taylor Streets, San Francisco 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Pnone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 
Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



19 East Street, Foot of Ferry Bridge 

Wholesale— OUTFITTER— Retail 

Everything for the man that goes to sea 

SEAMEN AND FISHERMEN 

GEO. A. PRICE 



u. s. 

Sen Boots 



IS RIGHT 

Navy 
Flannels 



Tower's 
Oil Skins 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Bayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall Bros. 


Express 


Stand and Baggage Room 


— at — 




212 EAST ST., San 


Francisco 


Phone Douglas 


5348 






Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts In the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

7M MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
•AN FRANCI8CO 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 

MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5 

UNIFORMS & SUITS, TO ORDER & READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 

36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



SAVE MONEY ON YOUR SHOES 

Would you walk one-half block from Market Street to 

Save $1 to $3? 

We are located at 58 Third 
St., San Francisco. 

We are agents for — 

W . L. Douglas 
Just Wright 
Walk Ease 
Strong & Garfield 

We can positively save 
you money by buying 
your SHOES from us. 

Our low rent and small 
expense make it possible 
for us to sell cheaper 
than the Market Street 
stores paying six times 
our rent. 

We are showing a most exclusive and large stock of men's 
shoes. We can fit any foot and suit any fancy. 




PRICE'S 



58 THIRD STREET 

Between Market and Mission 

San Francisco, Cal. 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 1804) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. T. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full Information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




JACOB PETERSEN * SON 
Proprietor! 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCIECO 



~c n/i r\vi7 T? Q See that this label (in light blue) a PP ears on 

O 1V1 \J IS. Hi IV O box in which you are served. 



the 



Issued by Authority 01 the Cigar Makers' Imgrnational Union of America 

,— ^ Union-made Cigars. 

aNSfoassTvfrA • ««8CR oi ihi bou mutn'muiiiiATioitAi union* »«"«. t* «mi»j«« drvonfl mm 

I (IWSml'l »«n»mwiortheM0Ml*U(IWI»UndlNIUlinil«lWllMl0fTlifOI»rl mifomWHWaw 
XV< ' JUU^T ?l W»M Giflirj to ill vnoUn llirouohout tft» iwxW. 

' "^SS/ <2 K GUttiUt, header* 

CJf/t/tf.lmmitt 



*TAM? 



* 


♦ 


News 


from Abroad 


* 


. a 



French steamers have resumed a 
daily cross-Channel service between 
Calais and Dover. 

It is anticipated that Natal's coal 
production for the present year will 
amount to at least 3,000,000 tons. 

The Argentine Government has 
asked Congress to vote 4,200,000 gold 
pesos for the improvement of the 
port of La Plata. It is proposed to 
deepen the port to a minimum depth 
of 30 feet. 

Emigration from the British West 
Indies to sugar estates in Cuba and 
Santo Domingo is continuing. From 
Jamaica alone laborers arc going to 
Cuba at the rate of nearly 2,500 
monthly. 

The future exportable surplus for 
Greater Rumania is estimated at 
5,000,000 tons of cereals, in addition 
to 500,000 tons St. Petersburg stand- 
ards of timber and 1,000,000 ions of 
petroleum products. 

The financial position of Egypt lias 
been strengthened considerably owing 
to the enormous wealth brought to 
the country (luring the war from 
sales of cotton, and Egypt is at the 
present moment considered as being 
in a better financial position than she 
has ever been before. 

As a result of the shortage of fuel 
in French Guiana, arrangements are 
being made for two freight-carrying 
aeroplanes to travel fortnightly be- 
tween the above-named colony and 
British Guiana to transport certain 
supplies to Cayenne; to obviate the 
necessity of depending entirely on 
steamer service. 

Jamaica is considering the creation 
of a banana inspection department 
in order to prevent the purchase of 
immature fruit and its destruction in 
order to stifle competition, as is 
alleged to have been done recently 
by an American company which thus 
attempted to drive a rival to the 
wall. 

For the first six months of the 
year the exports of Swedish iron ore 
amount to 1,500,000 tons, as against 
900,000 tons in the same period of 
1919. Coal and coke imports during 
the same period were, 1,177,155 tons 
(against 879,516 tons for 1919), of 
which 300,000 tons came from 
America. 

For the six first months of the 
year the exports of Swedish iron ore 
amount to 1,500,000 tons, as against 
900,000 tons in the same period of 
1919. Coal and coke imports during 
the same period were 1,177,155 tons 
(against 879,516 tons for 1919), of 
which 300,000 tons came from 
America. 

Forty-five prisoners of India are 
now imprisoned in Fort Blair jail 
in the Andaman Islands, the Siberia 
of India, according to the announce- 
ments here. Of these, twelve are 
from Bengal, two from Bombay, 
three from the United Provinces, 
and more than twenty from the 
Punjab. These men were charged 
with revolutionary activities against 
the British government in India, and 
have been in prison for many years. 
Although the British Government 
has proclaimed a so-called "am- 
nesty," the men are still caged in the 
Andaman Islands because they love 
their country and refuse to submit 
to British authority. The Andamans 
are composed of a number of small, 
marshy and unhealthy islands in the 
Bay of Bengal, about 1,000 miles 
off the Fast coast of India. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



« -4 


With the Wits 


♦ * 



Another Silver Heresy. — Too many 
men seem to think that optimism 
consists only of seeing the silver 
lining to the other man'' cloud. - 
[ >earborn Independent. 

A Correction.— "Was ouml- 

ed by Romeo?" inquired a pupil ol 

the teacher. "No, my hoy." replied 
the wise man; "it was Juliet who 
was found dead by Romeo." — Tit- 
Bits. 



iring the Hens Trouble.— "Here, 
Binks, I wish you'd take my garden 
seeds and give them to your hens 
with my compliments. It will save 
them the trouble of coming over al- 
ter them." — Life. 



Strong Family Resemblance. — 
"Contentment," remarked Shinebone, 
"am a mighty fine thing; de only 
trouble 'bout it is it's kin' o' hahd 
to s'tinguish from jes' plain lazi- 
ness." — Boston Transcript. 



Jugs, Not Jags.— "Pack my box 
with five dozen liquor-jugs," is the 
shortest sentence containing all the 
letters of the English alphabet, and 
there is no law against liquor-jugs so 
long as there is no liquor in them. — 
Concord Monitor. 



They Couldn't Help It.— Two 
friends met in the Strand the morn- 
ing after an airplane raid. "Any 
damage done your way?" the first 
asked. "Damage! Rather!" an- 
swered the other. "Father and 
mother were blown clean out of the 
window. The neighbors say it's the 
first time they've been seen to leave 
the house together in seventeen 
years."- -New York Globe. 



The Sign Language. -Kphum John- 
son was up before Judge Shimmer- 
plate on a crueltj to animals ch 
"Deed Ah wasn't abusing dat mule, 
judge," the old man demurred. "Did 
you not strike it repeatedly with a 
club?" "Vassah." "And do you not 
know that you can accomplish more 
with animals by speaking to them?" 
"Yassah; hut this critter am differ- 
ent. He am so deef he can't hear 
me when Ah speaks to him in de 
usual way. so Ah has to communi- 
cate wid him in de sign language." — 
Charleston Mail. 



I CAN SAVE YOU 

$15 

ON YOUR SUIT 



My place Is located on a 
side street, hence my 
expenses are practically 
nothing compared to big- 
houses on main thorough- 
fares. 



TOM WILLIAMS 

THE UNION TAILOR 

28 SACRAMENTO ST. 

You get the same class 
of Service. Woolen trim- 
mings and excellent 
Workmanship. The Style, 
Quality and Fit I guar- 
antee. 

Is the amount not worth saving? 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
Of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well informed man, and in a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 

500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

Hezzanith's, Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus, 
Dividers, Nautical Books, Charts and Tide Tables. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 

1866 — over SO years. Enough said. 
We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Diamonds 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Watches 

___ 64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postofflce 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 





l^ames J}. Sorensen 



The One Price Jewelry Store. Everything Marked In 
Plain Figures 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

Attractive Platinum or Gold Mountings with 

Exquisite Diamonds 

WEDDING RINGS 

Hand Carved In Platinum, White Gold, Green 

Gold and the Old Style Plain Gold in 12 

DIFFERENT STYLES and all sizes 

WEDDING GIFTS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

715 MARKET ST., Above Third SAN FRANCISCO 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

Store Open: 8:30 A. M. to 6:00 P. M., Saturday Included 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Franclscc 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. Til try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want vour Panama blocked 
right 111 do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

133 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 1660 



OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ARGONAUT S 





FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization 



VOL. XXXIV, Xo. 4. 



SAX FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1920. 



Whole No. 1720. 



AN INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S CODE 

Does It Stand for Progress or Reaction? 



The recent conference at Genoa, held 
under the auspices of the League of 
Nations, considered among other things 
the possibility of drawing up an Inter- 
national Seamen's Code. 

The conference agreed that the work of 
detailed codification could most suitably 
be undertaken by the International Labor 
Office functioning under the League of 
Nations. As previously reported in the 
Journal a recommendation was adopted to 
the effect that each maritime nation pro- 
ceed with formulating a "Seamen's Code" 
to facilitate the task of establishing an 
International Seamen's Code. 

A part of the code commission's report 
to the conference lias a rich historic back- 
ground and is therefore, because of its 
general interest, published herewith. 



In most countries the systematic codification 
of seamen's law has not been undertaken up 
to this time, with the result that there is fre- 
quently confusion in the minds of seamen, if 
not also in the minds of shipowners, as to 
the precise nature of their rights and obligations. 
The British Merchant Shipping Act of 1894 
and the German Seamen's law of 1902 may, in a 
sense, be called national seamen's codes, though 
the former is more in the nature of a general 
shipping code. A draft of a seamen's code had 
also been prepared in France before the war. 
But these compilations of the laws relating to 
seamen are not complete, and progress may 
still be made even in these countries toward a 
more complete systematization of seamen's 
law. 

The Commission is convinced that it would 
greatly facilitate the establishment of an In- 
ternational Seamen's Code, in the sense in 
which that end is approved by this Commission, 
if each of the maritime countries of the world 
would advance so far as possible the codifica- 
tion of its own law relating to seamen. The 
clear and systematic statement of the law of 
single compilation would 
for it to be understood 
The uniformity which 
be more easily extended 
such national codification were effected. 

The Commission has experienced some dif- 
ficulty in defining what is meant by an Inter- 
national Seamen's Code. It has decided that 
the term shall be used in this report to mean a 
collection of the laws and regulations dealing 
with the condition and position of seamen as 
such, which it may be possible for the various 
maritime countries of the world to adopt as a 
common and uniform body of international 
seamen's law. The content of such an Interna- 
tional Code has not been and could not be de- 



each country in a 
make it much easier 
in other countries, 
already exists would 
if 



termined with preciseness by this Commission. 
Indeed, the establishment of such a code must 
mi, hi a labor of years. 

The Commission has made a survey of the 
present situation for the purpose of determining 
whether any such general code or such special 
codes now exist In times past, the seafaring 
world has known the existence of a single 
body of law common to numerous maritime 
countries. The Rhodian law and the laws 
of Oleron are striking instances of Interna- 
tional Seamen's Codes which in their time 
served useful ends. 

'file "Consolate del Mare" served the Medi- 
terranean countries during severaj centuries as a 
sort of international code of maritime law. 
\ 1 1 < 1 in this connection it is fitting that this 
Conference assembled in Genoa should pay its 
tribute to the commentaries on the "Consolato 
del Mare" by a famous Cenovese citizen in the 
earlv part of the eighteenth century, Giuseppe 
Mari Casaregi (1670-173,7). The debt owed to 
him by modern civilization itself is an indica- 
tion of the possibilities of international codifica- 
tion. 

If the modern growth of nationalism has 
tended to the creation of separate national mari- 
time laws there are not lacking signs that in 
recent years appreciation has become more 
general of the unity of the seafaring world as 
an international community. The Conference 
which assembled at London in 1913 and 1914 
and which elaborated an International Conven- 
tion for the safety of life of both seamen and 
passengers at sea is an instance of this. Men- 
tion may also be made of the conventions con- 
cerning several specific divisions of sea law. 
which have from time to time been drawn up 
by the International Committee for the Unifica- 
tion of Maritime Law, and some of which have 
already found acceptance in the law of numerous 
maritime countries. 

The Commission has fortunately included 
among its members certain representatives of 
the Scandinavian countries, and it is indebted to 
those gentlemen for an account of the Inter- 
national Scandinavian Maritime Law of IS 1 ).?. 
I >( ninark, Norway and Sweden have found it 
possible since that date to maintain a common 
shipping law, and the fact that a common law 
exists has been of great benefit to Scandinavian 
shipowners and seamen. At the present time 
representatives of these countries and represent- 
atives of Finland are working on a commission 
which has been entrusted with its revision. 

The Commission therefore feels it unnecessarj 
to labor an argument that it is possible to 
establish an International Seamen's Code, in 
the sense in which that term is used in this re- 
port. It is convinced that, it this possibility 
acted upon and an International Code is estab- 
lished through the medi oi the International 

Labor organization, it is only the willingness oi 
(lie maritime States which are members of the 
01 niization to adopt and enforce its provisions, 
which will condition its success. 

The argument has been heard during the 
meeting of the Genoa Conference that the 
codification oi sea law on an international scale 



any 
astic 

be a 



would be most dangerous; that it would mean 
the perpetuation of many obsolete provisions in 
existing law; and that if such codification were 
successfully attempted, it would make it more 
difficult in the future to liberalize existing law 
and to adapt it to changing conceptions of 
social justice. The Commission has felt it its 
duty to examine this argument earnestly and 
thoroughly, and as a result of such examination, 
it lias been convinced that such dangers are not 
serious, if indeed they exist at all. Certainly 
there can be no danger in codifying and 
uniformizing the law which is already some- 
what uniform in various countries. And if it 
should prove to be unwise to proceed except in 
rare instances with the codiliication of the law 
on very contentious subjects, the demonstration 
of this fact will from time to time enable the 
advocates of further codification to escape such 
dangers. 

The Commission would point out that 
international code should be framed in e 
terms, and that if its content cannot ever 
maximum of the lepra] regulation existing in any 
one country, it should nevertheless be the 
maximum of the regulations common to nu- 
merous countries. It must also be noted that 
in the Draft Convention adopted at the Wash 
ington Conference a very salutary principle 
was introduced in the articles requiring period 
ical consideration of the necessity for re- 
vision. This principle should find a permanent 
p'ace in the seamen's legislation attempted 
through the medium of the International Labor 
organization; and in the opinion of this Com- 
mission it affords sufficient assurance against 
the possibility that law wdiich may have become 
common to various countries would be more 
difficult to change in any one country. 

Nor does experience in the Scandinavian 
countries, wdiich already have a common mari- 
time law. justify serious fear. The Scandi- 
navian ("ode has already been modified by the 
convention on assistance at sea signed in 
Brussels in 1911 and further modification may 
result from the work of the revision committee 
which is now sitting. On the whole, therefore, 
although the Commission has attempted to 
survey without previous commitment the possi 
hie dangers attending codification of sea law 
on an international scale, it has been convinced 
that these dangers are slight, if not non- 
existent, and greatly outweighted by advantages 
-\ In h may accrue. 

Of the possible advantages which may be 
expected from the establishment of an Inter- 
national Seamen's Code, as envisaged in tin's 
report, the Commission would direct especial 
attention upon two outstanding points, Unlike 
workers in many other fields, seamen must 
often do their work in several countries, in 
each of which it may be necessary for them 
to know something of the law as to their 
relations with their employers and their fel- 
lows. Even when not in other countries, much 
of the seamen's work must be done on the 
world's highway, far removed from the usual 
reach of public authorities, Moreover, on the 
ships of most countries the seamen an 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



quently of many nationalities It is not unusual 
that the seamen on a ship neither speak the 
language of the ship's country, nor understand 
its laws. Seamen form what is, indeed, an inter- 
national community, and as such they have 
many relations on which it would greatly re- 
dound to their advantage to have applied to 
them a uniform law, whatever flag be flown 
by the vessel on which they ship. Such a 
uniform law ran he secured only ■ through 
common international action. 

Another advantage is quite as obvious and 
quite as important. With commercial compe- 
tition between the merchant fleets of various 
countries as keen as it was in the days before 
the war and as it promises to be in the years 
to come, there are certain fields in which 
various States find it difficult to adopt any new 
legislation because of its possible reaction to the 
advantage of the merchant fleet of a competing 
country. If, for instance, one State attempts 
by legislation to secure the improvement of 
seamen's living accommodations, it may find it 
self at a disadvantage vis a vis another State 
which fails or refuses to make a similar change 
in its laws. Commerce tends to apportion itself 
among States in accordance with the advantages 
and disadvantages in existing legislation, and 
the balance which is thus struck at any one 
time is frequently a very delicate and pre- 
carious one which any change in legislation may 
upset. 

Progress in national law may therefore de- 
pend to a large extent upon the possibility of 
common international action in a particular 
legislative field, and without such international 
action the progress which is possible may be 
precluded altogether. 

An historic example of this necessity for com- 
mon international action is furnished by the 
Plimsoll law enacted in England in 1894. 

It was contended that the limit placed by 
this law- on the load-line for British ships was 
to the disadvantage of British shipowners^ in 
competition with those of other countries. The 
effect of this legislation and the history of its 
administration furnish convincing proof that 
standards which are thought desirable in one 
country cannot sometimes be attained unless 
other countries proceed simultaneously to adopt 
the same standards. 

Without attempting to enumerate other ad- 
vantages which may he expected from an In- 
ternational Seamen's Code, the Commission is 
convinced that in the circumstances of the 
modern industrial and commercial world, the 
codification of sea law, in certain fields at least, 
lias Income not only a commercial necessity, but 
also the sine quo non for the application to 
workers at sea of standards already attained 
and commonly accepted for workers on land. 
In these fields, the alternatives are international 
action, or slow and tardy progress. 

The Commission has not attempted to lay 
down in detail the general principles which 
should find expression in such an International 
Seamen's Code, and it is convinced that for the 
most part the establishment of these princi- 
ples must await more thorough investigation. 
It seems clear, however, that any codification 
to be attempted should at first he in those fields 
where a measure of uniformity already exists 
in the laws of various countries. There are 
certain respects, principally concerning the 
formal relations existing between the seaman 
and his employer, in which the laws of many 
countries have long followed the same general 
course. Just as national codification has been 
most successful when preceded by a large 
degree of maturity in the laws codified, so it 
will perhaps prove that in international codifi- 
cation the readiest fields are those in which 
uniformity now exists. But codification must 
also meet the need for international action in 
those fields where national action is impossible 
or difficult without it and if the framing of 
generally acceptable legislation in such fields 
may call for more thorough investigation and 
more extensive adjustment of principles and 
policies, it should nevertheless prove quite as 
indispensable and quite as successful. 

Whether an International Seamen's Code 
should be a complete body of law concerning 
seamen, or whether it would be more useful to 
elaborate special codes for particular fields of 
seamen's law-, the Commission has not at- 
tempted to decide. 



"FULLE OF DEVVYLS." 



Once upon a time, when voyagers ven- 
tured into strange lands and among alien 
peoples, they drove into a fog of doubt 
and mystery. 

When they returned, they sometimes 
wrote books telling of what they had seen 
or, like their brethren of to-day, what they 
thought their readers expected them to 
have seen. 

Invariably, however, the old adventurers 
drew maps of the new lands as these had 
opened to their gaze. These maps they 



adorned with comment "ti the country's 
resources, such as "Here is tnuche gold," 

"Many elephants ami ivorie," ami other 
early fore -ru mi ers of the modern mining 
prospectus. 

It often happened, though, that the 
scanty appliances of those days did not 
permit of extended journeys or accurate 
observations. Still, the directors at home 
would have to be satisfied that they had 
got their money's worth, so the balance of 
the chart was filled in with an imaginary 
littoral, the hinterland of which was dotted 
with "Dimondes are found here"; "Manye 
ostryches and apes." Then, across all, 
would be written, "None venture herein : 
this lande is fulle of devvyls." 

Tt always proved a winner. The wisdom 
of the explorer in turning back was never 
questioned. His directors passed him a 
vote of thanks, and let it go at that, just 
as the Shipping Combine does to-day. 

But one cannot help thinking that the 
ancient mariner's recipe for avoiding ques- 
tions, and side-stepping new experiments, 
is not altogether unknown to us to-day. 

There is a section of the community — 
not the largest, or the most deserving, but 
the most powerful and wealthy, worse 
hick — to whom any territory — terrestrial, 
political, or economical — lyiii£ outside their 
own prejudice-guarded ambit, is "a lande 
fullc of devvyls." 

To these folk it is vain to go with the 
proofs that just beyond the iron hills lies 
a country of milk and honey for all, a 
land that can be reached by a road that all 
can follow easily and pleasantly, if only 
all will. 

No use to tell them that the unlocking 
of the gate is in their hands ; a gracious 
task which will cost the few that are 
mighty little, while it will open a new 
heaven upon earth to the many weary and 
oppressed. 

They open out their charts, made for 
them and vouched by their led-captains. 

"Nay, nay," they say: "none venture 
there. That lande is fulle of devvyls."' 
— J. R. H. in Australian Worker. 



WORKMEN'S HEALTH INSURANCE. 



A campaign for the passage of a work- 
men's health insurance bill has been 
launched by the Maine State Federation of 
Labor, following two resolutions unani- 
mously adopted at its recent annual con- 
vention at Waterville, calling for the uni- 
versal health insurance plan and instruct- 
ing the legislative committee to work for 
its adoption. 

"Sickness, which each year affects one- 
fifth of the adult workers, is the most 
prolific source of poverty," declares the 
Federation's resolution. "Even the fear 
of sickness and its disastrous effects under- 
mines the well-being of the workers. The 
workers, through the trade unions and 
fraternal organizations, have made heroic 
efforts to meet this crying need of the 
wage earners. In these sick benefit plans, 
the workers bear the entire expense, al- 
though industry is in part responsible for 
the sickness among workers." 

The universal plan is endorsed by the 
Federation because compulsory health in- 
surance will "bring sickness protection to 
all workers" and will "place upon industry 



its just share of the cost of such in- 
surance." 

The Federation insists that the work- 
men's health insurance law furnish sickness 
protection at actual cost, with all private 
profits by stock insurance companies ab- 
solutely prohibited. 

"Such a measure," the resolution says, 
"should embrace medical care and cash 
benefits during illness, and funeral benefit; 
should provide for active participation of 
the workers in the management and for 
democratic administration ; and should ex- 
clude all interference by the commercial 
insurance interests." 

A second resolution refers to the ben- 
efits of the State Workmen's Compensation 
law "to safeguard the wage-earners from 
the results of industrial accidents," and 
urges the adoption of "health insurance 
laws which have been proven by experience 
to be an efficient means of protecting 
wage-earners from sickness.'' 

With this advanced action a total of 
more than 21 State Federations of Labor 
and 30 national labor organizations are 
now on record in favor of workmen's health 
insurance legislation. 



SOVIETS IN ITALY. 



In the industrial region of northern 
Italy the metallurgical plants have been 
seized by the workmen and are being run 
by their councils or Soviets as in Russia. 
The movement arose in Milan where 280 
industrial establishments were taken over 
on the first three days of September and other 
cities soon followed suit. In some cases 
the managers and superintendents were 
forcibly retained to direct operations or 
were kidnapped from their homes for that 
purpose. At the Lombard automobile 
factory at Milan six directors were im- 
prisoned in the works as hostages to 
secure payment of wages. The workmen 
in the Fiat factory have announced that 
they will sell the automobiles they make 
on their own account. Red flags are 
hoisted over the soviet plants and pictures 
of Lenin are displayed on the walls. The 
factories have been fortified against attack 
by barricades and barbed wire. In some 
case bare wires carrying high voltage 
currents are strung around the building. 
Machine guns are mounted on the roofs 
and at the entrances. Abandoned muni- 
tion plants have been seized and set to 
making arms for the insurgents. In 
Venice they have captured the arsenal. 
The workmen mostly' live in the factories 
to serve as garrisons. They are under 
military discipline and allowed only a 
limited amount of liquor. At Genoa and 
Naples all the shipping in the harbor has 
been forced to raise the red flag by orders 
of the seamen and dockers committees. 

The occupation of the plants by the 
employes has been accomplished with 
little bloodshed and little effort has been 
made to recover them. The Government 
remains neutral and inactive. The Min- 
ister of Labor, Signor Labriola, is a So- 
cialist and holds that this is an industrial 
dispute in which the Government has no 
right to interfere so long as the move- 
ment does not take a political form. The 
General Federation of Labor has en- 
dorsed the action of the metal workers. — 
From the Independent, New York. September 
18, 1920. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAU 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Labor Defeats Congressman Esch 

Labor's defeat of Congressman Esch in 
the Wisconsin primaries is a distinct fea- 
ture of the A. F. of L. non-partisan cam- 
paign. 

Congressman Esch has represented the 
LaCrosse district continuously for 20 
years. Two years ago he was re-elected 
by 10,000 majority over two other candi- 
dates, and as chairman of the House In- 
terstate and Foreign Commerce Commit- 
tee he is credited in the popular mind 
with being co-author of the Cummins-Esch 
railroad bill. 

His candidacy in the recent primaries 
centered on this legislation and he in- 
sisted that the law was the best possible, 
but labor in that district is non-partisan 
and therefore wanted facts. As a result 
Mr. Esch will retire to private life when 
the present Congress ends next March. 

Other candidates who defend this law 
are telling their audiences that "I will look 
you square in the eye and declare that this 
is the best legislation that was ever 
passed." This statement is a heroic ges- 
ture, but it is neither argument nor fact. 
It is suited for the days when partisanship 
was rampant, when the labor vote was 
delivered in many sections of the country, 
the passing of which seems to be deplored 
by those who declare "Gompers is trying 
to deliver the labor vote," when he and 
other trade unionists urge non-partisan- 
ship to stop the delivery of labor's vote. 

The defeat of Congressman Esch and the 
cheap drama defense of the railroad act 
recalls a speech by Congressman Sanders 
of Louisiana when the bill was before the 
House of Representatives for final pas- 
sage. The House had previously refused 
to accept the Cummins bill, passed by the 
Senate, and the Senate had rejected the 
Esch bill, passed by the House. This sit- 
uation forced both bills into conference, 
where conferees representing both branches 
of Congress secretly adjusted differences. 
Forty-eight hours before the House was 
called upon to vote on the conference re- 
port it was made public. In refusing to 
vote for the new bill, Congressman San- 
ders said there was nothing left of the 
Cummins and the Esch bills but the titles. 
He declared that there was not a member 
of the House of Representatives, save pos- 
sibly its members of the conference, who 
understood the report, and that it was a 
physical impossibility to intelligently digest 
the 120 pages of the report between the 
time it was made public and the hour for 
final vote. 

"The study that I have been able to give 
to the report," said the Louisiana law- 
maker, "convinces me that it is bad and, 
therefore, I am going to vote against it 
because the sections that I have studied, 
sections that I do understand, convince 
me that it has not been written in the in- 
terest of the 110,000,000 people of Amer- 
ica." 

Congressman Sanders's statement shows 
how this legislation was rushed through 
Congress, with the people whipped to a 
frenzy by special privilege and its defend- 
ers, who well know that their prosperity 



depends upon blind partisanship and a 
careless electorate. 



Trust's Spokesman Told to Face Facts. 

In an open letter to the Iron Age, semi- 
official organ of the steel trust and de- 
fender of Garyism, officers of the inter- 
church world movement suggest that this 
publication "face the facts." The editor 
is asked : 

"Are cold facts on an actually existant 
autocracy to be met forever by trite fears 
of another, non-existant autocracy, or by 
talk of 'wonderful progress,' when the 
hours in the industry are longer now than 
10 years ago? Are blacklists and spy sys- 
tems the industry's pride?" 

The church men say that among inde- 
pendent steel mill owners there are men 
who profess repugnance to the present 
system of refusing to confer with workers 
and the means used to maintain Garyism, 
but for reasons concerning the steel trust 
they claim they are unable to speak out. 

The church men have also appealed to 
the public to take whatever steps are 
possible, through organization or other- 
wise, to avert another steel strike and 
consequent nation-wide trouble. This letter 
asks : 

"The 12-hour day, involving hundreds of 
thousands ; the seven-day week ; wages 
that make for unhealthy communities and 
an underfed race ; arbitrary management 
which penalizes the American spirit and 
corrupts its institutions — is the reform of 
all this to be left simply to the hazard of 
a strike? 

"Cannot a democracy govern itself? 
Must the public, forewarned, rest inert 
while a basic industry prepares trouble for 
all? Just because the strike is some way 
off, or because the national campaign to 
allocate our political governance is on, is 
the great democracy to let economic gov- 
ernance go by sheer default?" 



"From Stem to Stern." 
W. A. Atterbury, vice-president of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, is as mad as the 
proverbial hornet because employes of that 
system are unionized. Mr. Atterbury un- 
burdened his woes to the Philadelphia 
Chamber of Commerce. He said the Penn- 
sylvania was strictly non-union when the 
Government took control and now, to his 
horror, he finds when this property is re- 
turned it is organized, to use his language, 
"from stem to stern." 

The speaker's sorrowful tale would bring 
tears to a paving block and a sympathetic 
audience agreed that labor "broke its 
promise during the war." Mr. Atterbury 
construed the government's promise that 
there would be no reduction of labor 
standards during the war to mean that 
when the government took control of the 
railroads it should maintain the Pennsyl- 
vania's anti-union policy. Instead, Director 
General of Railroads McAdoo, in order 
No. 8, said : 

"No discrimination will be made in the 
employment, retention or conditions of 
(Continued on Page 11) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 
355 North Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia — 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg , Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South 
Australia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot, Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 

Internationale Transportarheiter-Federation 
Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE 

General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 

Norsk Matros-og Fy rbo t ev-U n i on, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan, F. 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 

Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Longgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade. 15 Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Y. Strand- 
strade 20, Cobenhavn. 

HOLLAND 

Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

AUSTRIA 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

ITALY 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S. Marcellino 6-2, Italy. 

SPAIN 

Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle In- 
glaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregaods em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



*_ 


» 


World's Workers 


*•. _ - 


.> 



The Mini-tf. of I abor's figures 
showed thai th< cosl of living in 
England on July 31 was 155 per 
cent, above the pre-war level. 

The annual i the Spanish 

Typographical Union shows a mem- 
bership of 7.IKIO The union is 
strongest in Madrid, and weakest 
in Barcelona, which is noted for the 
anarchistic tendencies of its workers. 

Ex-service nun in South Wales 
have passed resolutions applauding 
the failure of the Territorial recruit- 
ing scheme, and refusing to 
any mobilization order for military 
operations against Russia or Ireland. 

On :>. promise by President de la 
I [uerta thai a 9peedy and jusl settle- 
ment of their demands would be 
made. 75.011(1 workers on strike 
throughout Mexico, have returm 
work. The strikers' demands Include 
wage increases that range tdom 50 
to 100 per cent. 

The French wholesale co-operative 
iv has done business this year 
to the amount of over 150.000.IKHI 
francs. In 1914 the business totaled 
19.000,000 francs. In Douai the co- 
operatives reduced the price of 
stuffs 33 per cent., much to the 
guest of profiteers and to the jo 
wage earners. 

Eighteen secret commandments, 
which I.enine required French t 
union- to subscribe to before they 
woidd be admitted to the Third 
Internationale, at MOSCOW, have been 
made public ill Paris. They provide 
among other things for press censor- 
ship to secure a uniform Communist 
policy, and an iron discipline of a 
quasi-military character to be im- 
posed by a strongly centralized body. 

'The boycott <>f Hungary by the 
International Federation of I 
Unions is one of the most significant 
events of the year. Worker- of all 

countries are appealed to. to cm of) 
Hungary, as a thin- accursed, until 
the \\ hite I error is lifted. With the 
thoroughness of a Biblical curse. 
Hungary is to have no food, no sup- 
plies, no communication, even, with 
the outside world. If indirectly the 
victims of Horthy have to suffer with 
him, their lot can scarcely be 
worse than it is now. and this seems 
the only way in which to save them. 
The camouflaged League of Nations 

has done and will do nothing, and 
as Usual it is up to the workers to 
themselves. 
After pledging their one 
wages to the 

of the Punjab, thousands of workers 
in a mass meeting in Bombay, 
resenting different industries recently 
voted for an All-India Trade Union 
Congress to be held soon in that 
city. Thi- meeting passed r< 
lions denouncing the attempt 

British Government to choose In- 
dia's Labor representative to the 
International Labor Conference. 
Government nominates X. M. .1 
but the trade unionists want l.ala 
Lajpat Kai The Revolutionists want 
someone else. They hold that a 
Home Rider like Lajpat Rai ha- no 
moral right to represent India 
he will debauch international public 
■ ■pinion by his Home Rule pi 
ganda. Any one, they say, 
opposes the independence of India, 
and wishes or works for the pi 
vation of the British Empire is. di- 
rectly or indirectly, consciousl 
unconsciously, an the Brit- 

ish capitalists. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florshcim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boot." 

See them at M BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529'A BEACON STREET. SAN PEDRO. CAL 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under hk undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 

ful Collective Bargaining 

Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
1 lisputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 
COLLIS LOVELY. General President CHARLES L. BAINE. General Setretary-Treasurer 





Washington Was 
Thrifty In Youth 

Biographers relate Mai George Wash- 
ington opened a bank account when he was 
sixteen years old. He had a job with a 
surveyor. 

Youth is the accepted time for opening 
a bank account. It is never too late, 
however. 

All great fortunes have had modest be- 
ginnings. Many men have made fortunes 
after middle life. 

See us today about opening an ac- 
count. 




Anglo-C\lifornia company Bank 

COMMERCIAL- SAVINGS -TRUST 

"y/io Personal Service HantC 

MARKET 6 SANSOME STREETS 
5an Francisco 

P0TRER0 BRANCH MISSION BRANCH FILLMORE BRANCH 
Third and Twentieth Sixteenth and Mission Fillmore and Geary 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Will II. Peterson and G. Johnson, 
Formerly winchmen of S. S. "Carmel" 
to communicate with J. T. Smith, 
Room 411, 112 Market St.. San Fran- 
cisco. 9-8-20. 



Any one 7<no\ving tVie whereabouts 
of the brother of August W. Stras- 
din, will please communicate with 
B. I. LaSelle, 024 Crocker RldR.. 
San Francisco. 9-15-20 



INFORMATION WANTED 

M e m b e r s of crews of Barge 
"Ohio" and S. S. "Gulfcoast" will 
kindly communicate with this office 
regarding their salvage claims 
against the Standard Oil Barge No. 
1 between Mobile and Port Arthur 
about May 18th. I represent a 
member of the crew and have 
ly taken up the matter of a 
salvage award for him. Silas B. 
Axtell, New York, N. Y. 7-14-20 



Navigation School 

License Guaranteed or Fee Refunded. 

Mates' Courses, $55.00 

WRITE FOR CIRCULAR 

niiikrs. from $117.50; 
■"■»; Marine Night Glasses 
from (27.60 — Best Makes. 

CAPTAIN PENNRICH 

36 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Near Borough Hall Sub. .station 



S. G. SWANSOH 

Established i:>04 

For tne BEST there is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE- S G. Swanson is not conneeted 
with any dye works and lias no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2o Floor, Bank of San Pedro. 110 W. 6th 8t. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront. Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP^OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

- Try - 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A R. ABRAHAM8EN. Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SIIOKS. HATS, RUBBER 
INT) OIL CLOTHING 

'07 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 

You Want the Truth 

re will !»• stirring times 

In thi Lin vernmenl cen- 

sorship it Is Increasingly dlffii ult for 
i in gel tii" real mean- 
i.il and ■ i love- 

mentt day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will I ated at Wash- 

ington ami will analyze and present the 
news froi pital truthfully and 

fairly. \jb. Follette is making a 

to lift BOme of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and p 
them win-]' they belong- mi excess 
profits, war profits ami surplus fortunes 
and incomes. Because of this he is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
public life. 
Send in your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year — Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine, Madison, Wis. 

Honolulu Letter List 



^on. Bert 
Bradley, Ed. 
Buck, Harry 

i 'a Id well, John 
Campbell, Ed. 
i lanlelsen, Adolph 

Pant. B. C. 
Ettersen, Ward 
Hams, Ed. 
Johnsen, Hilding 
I. arson, John 



Lame. Pat. 
Leison, Will. 
Lind, Oust. 
Matson, Rolf. 
Mulligan, Ed. 
Niekols, Henry 
Sandel. T. S. 
Stronberg, Pet. 
Stewart, A. J. 
Solberg, B. P. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of George Mace Monroe, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
last heard of at Charleston, S. C, 
March, 1916, will please communi- 
cate with his mother, Mrs. Alice 
Monroe. 918 Spruce street, Seattle, 
Washington. 6-9-20 



TO MY CLIENTS 


Please look over our legal 


reports 


on file in every 


Union 


Hall on the coasts 


whene\ 


er you are in port. 


N( itice 


of commencement <>i 


all actions, their appearance 


on thi 


calendar for trial. 


trials. 


udgments and settle- 


merits 


effected are published 


itt all 


cases whether for 


wages, 


salvage or personal 


injury. 


Law Office, Silas B. 


Axtell, 


9 State Street. New 


York. 





THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine 



Captain T. M. Scott of Mobile, Ala., has 
officially taken over the schooner "A. S. Coates." 
now in the Skinner & Eddy yards at Seattle. 

The schooner "A. F. Coats" has been char- 
tered by J. J. Moore & Co. to carry lumber 
from Puget Sound to Australia at $32 per 
thousand. 

Receipts from the operation of Portland's 
municipal terminals in 1921 will total $359,000, 
according to estimates of receipts and disburse- 
ments compiled for consideration of the Public 
Dock Commission in preparing its budget. 

After charging off more than $64,000 for de- 
preciaion and $185,000 for bond interest, the 
Seattle Port Commission properties show a 
profit of $86,468.16 for the first six months of 
the year, according to a financial statement com- 
pleted recently. 

The A. W. Carlson Company, a new concern 
which has leased the Duwamish Waterway ship- 
yard of the Inter-Ocean Barge and Transport 
Company, of Seattle, is starting out with work 
enough in sight to keep all its men busy for 
several months. 

Losses of more than $500,000 each were 
suffered by the Shipping Board in accepting the 
bids on the concrete tankers ''Palo Alto" and 
"Peralta," now building at Oakland, Cal., in 
the opinion of shipbuilders. The Atlantic Re- 
fining Company of Philadelphia offered $825,000 
for the "Palo Alto." and the American Fuel 
Oil and Transportation Company of New York- 
bid $700,000 for the "Peralta." ' Two more of 
the concrete tankers are building at San Pedro. 

The tank motor ship "Charlie Watson." 
launched from the yards of the Union Con- 
struction Company on August 14, shortly will 
be in service for the Standard Oil Company be- 
tween Southern and Northern California oil 
norts. The vessel takes the place of the 
"George Loomis," lost in 1918 off Coos Bay. 
The tanker "Asuncion," recently sold by the 
Standard Oil Company to George W. McNear 
& Company, has been at the Moore yards and 
soon will be read}' to depart with fuel oil for 
Copenhagen. 

The Moore Shipbuilding Company has been 
awarded the contract for repairs to the Hutch 
steamer "Arakan." which was ashore on tin- 
Point Reyes beach. The Moores offered to 
complete the extensive iob in ninety calendar 
days at a figure of $297,854. Bid of the Beth- 
lehem yards was $306,021, at ninetv-nine calen- 
dar days. Repairs to the "Arakan" will include 
109 bottom plates and 110 frame floors and re- 
verse frames, and it will be necessary to remove 
the funnel, main engines, auxiliary engines, 
boilers and thrust shrift for realignment. 

Captain Joseph J. Mea'ny has resignd as as- 
sistant local and traveling inspector of the 
United States Steamship Inspection Service to 
take command of the shipping board steamer 
"llannawa," now nearing completion at the 
Union Tron Works. The "Hannawa" will In- 
operated by the Luckenbach Steamship Com- 
pany and will load cargo at San Francisco for 
the coast-to-coast service of the company. Be- 
fore entering the inspection service Captain 
Mrany was commander of the United States 
collier "Tris" and for many years an officer on 
the American-Hawaiian ships. 

J. F. Dillon, radio inspector for the San Fran- 
cisco district, said he had received no complaint 
lliat Tananese wireless, operators are "hogging 
the air." Tt was reported that Radio Telegra- 
phers' Union is preparing a protest, pointing 
miii an instance where the operator of the T. 
K. I\. liner "Siberia Main" insisted upon using: 
his instrument beyond the permitted period 
Government regulations require operators, in 
sending long messages, to stop every fifteen 
minutes and wait three minutes before resuming 
in order that ships in danger or with mes- 
sages of importance may "cut in." 

It is reported that the Anglo-Saxon Petroleum 
Co.. of London, has placed orders on the 
Pacific Coast for six tankers, three with the 
Union Construction Co. of San Francisco, and 
three with the Southwestern Shipbuilding Co., 
of San Pedro. These tankers arc of 8100 tons 
deadweight each. The order for the Anglo- 
Saxon tankers was originally placed months ago 
with Pusey & Jones, but was canceled on 
account of the troubles between that company 
and the Shipping Board, arising out of orders 
placed in 1916 by Christoffer Hannevig and 
other Norwegians, which were later sold to the 
Cunard Company at a profit and commajideered 
by the Shipping Board. 

With the delivery of the cargo steamship 
"Apus," of 9550 tons deadweight, the G. M. 
Standifer Construction Corporation, Vancouver. 
Wash., completed its war program, in the 
course of which the company built and de- 
livered fifteen freighters of 141,750 tons dead 
weight. The company now has private orders 
on hand for four tankers of 30,844 tons gi 
register. The Southwestern Shipbuilding 
San Pedro, Cal., has also completed its war 
program with the delivery of the steamship 

"Hollywood." 8800 tons deadweight. This com- 
pany built for the Emergency Fleet Corporation 
eighteen freighters of 158,400 tons deadweight, 



This company has on hand private orders for 
two vessels of 17,_'H(l tons gross register. 

The San Pedro harbor department is increas- 
ing its force rapidly and has established a con- 
creting plant in the inner harbor. Tubular con- 
crete piling for various wharf projects now 
are being made there. The concrete is cast 
around a hollow paper core. The Gunnite 
method of making the piling is followed and 
the resulting mixture is said to he so dense that 
it is impossible for water to penetrate the 
piling. The department also has arranged for a 
concrete barge which carries material to all 
parts of the bay from the central plant. It is 
sufficiently large to hold 1000 tons of material, 
and each night is returned to the central plant, 
where it is loaded by the night force of men 
and then is ready for service early the next 
day. 

Capitulation on the part of the Shell Com- 
pany of California to the United States Navy 
and its willingness to supply ''all the oil it can" 
at $2 a barrel was announced during the week 
by R. A. Lewin, vice-president and general 
manager of the Royal Hutch concern. Lewis 
declared his company was at a loss to account 
for the continued seizures of oil by the Xavy, 
as his company had announced that it would 
meet the Navy's demand to supply oil at $2 a 
barrel. The company will continue, Lewin said, 
to charge its private customers $2.35 a barrel. 
A charge heard at Twelfth Xaval Histrict head- 
quarters that the Shell Company is understood 
to be furnishing oil on contract to the Japanese 
Navy was answered by Lewis with the ad- 
mission that his company is exporting some 
oil to the Orient and understood that mosl oi 
it was going to vessels of the United States 
Shipping Board. 

Equipment of all lighthouses with wireless 
will reduce the dangers from fog to a minimum, 
according to Frederick Kolster, radio expert of 
the Bureau of Standards, who is on the Coast 
from Washington inspecting the new radio 
compass stations which were established re- 
cently to aid vessels in finding their positions 
offshore. Some of the lighthouses and b 
ships on the Atlantic Coast are equipped with 
automatic wireless by which a mariner can 
ascertain his exact position in foggy weather 
by listening at a wireless receiver in the pilot 
house. Kolster has designed a system by which 
short wave flash signals can be sent from light- 
houses and lightships that can be picked up by 
captains on approaching shore and thereby 
obviate the use of the compass stations and the 
operators. By this system a captain could 
adjust his compass to the signals and proceed 
to port without danger of running ashore. 

Through the deal effected by Norton, Lilly. 
& Co. of New York, the big Skinner & Eddy 
shipyards at Seattle, Wash., covering twenty- 
live acres, will become the Pugct Sound terminal 
of the Isthmian Steamship Line and the Societe 
General de Transports Maritime a Vapeur of 
Marseilles, France. The combined fleets will 
have twenty-five American and three French 
steamers, aggregating 271.275 tons, sailing to 
the Atlantic Coast. Great Britain. France, Spain 
and Xorth Africa. Closing of the deal followed 
the announcement a short time ago that the 
Isthmian Steamship Line had decided definitely 
to place twenty-live 10,000-tonners on the 
Seattle route, twenty of the vessels operating 
in the iutercoastal service between Seattle and 
other coast ports and New York via the Panama 
Canal and live between Seattle and other coast 
ports and the United Kingdom, also via the 
canal. Of the ships, seven are already in full 
operation in the canal route, while the trans- 
atlantic fleet of live ships is in full operation. 

Captain Roald Amundsen, whose Polar expe- 
dition ship, the "Maud," is wedged in the ice 
twenty miles off Cape Serge on the Siberian 
coast, is in danger of losing his vessel and may- 
be forced to abandon his attempt to reach the 
pole, according to Dr. James H. Condit, super- 
intendent of Presbyterian mission in Alaska. 
who arrived at Seattle during the week on the 
steamship "Victoria," from Nome, Alaska. Dr. 
Condit said word was received of the plight of 
the "Maud'' just as tin- "Victoria" sailed from 
Nome, and that the residents of that city are 
greatly concerned over the fate of the explorer. 
The vessel is tightly wedged between ice Hoes 
and the rockbound Siberian coast, and is in 
grave danger of being ground to pieces. Dr. 
Condit said. The first news of the "Maud" was 
brought to Nome by a fishing vessel. On leav- 
ing Nome in July Amundsen sailed into Bering 
Strait, passing ('ape Prince of Wales and thenci 
into the Arctic Sea via East Cape. Northwest 
erl) winds which have prevailed during the 
summer carried the great Arctic ice floes to tin 
easl coast of Siberia, and the "Maud" a 
caught in the ice pack, according to information 
e d .it Nome. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



S. T. Hogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer. Seamen*! 
pi cialty. Sixth floor, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1830. — Adv. 



Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

67-69 Front Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass MILLER JENSEN, Agent 

1% Lewis Street 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JAMES C. BURNS, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WM. MILLER. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I ALFRED TAMKE, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga L. A. PARKS, Agent 

27 Houston Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS. Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla C. THEO. IVERSON, Agent 

12% Liberty Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C H. COOK, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS. Agent 

411 Union Street 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. V. ROREN, Agent 

433 Court Street 

BALTIMORE, Md J. A. MORRIS, Agent 

1641 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa DAVID COOK, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

MOBILE, Ala J. W. ENGLAND, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex R. M. WILSON, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga 21 West Bay Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C W. ROSSI, Agent 

49 Market Street 
Sub Aqencies: 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEAN W. MENDELL, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla CHAS. OGRAIN, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PORTLAND, Me 5 Exchange Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 669 Eddy Street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH. Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN. N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md LAWRENCE GILL, Agent 

804 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex HARRY BROWN, Agent 

321% Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAN LYONS, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala JAMES GRACE, Agent 

11% St. Francis Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I C. BLAKNEY, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me A. ANDRADE, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH. Ga GEO. McMURDO, Agent 

523 East Bay Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla J. T. HADAWAY, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla PATRICK KEANE. Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C J. T. ROBINSON, Agent 

49 Market Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

Headquarters: 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary. 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PROVINCETOWN. Mass F. L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

NEW BEDFORD, Mass C. E. DOUCETT. Agent 

91 North Second Street 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

H. ESKIN, Secretary 

HOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

FASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
D r fiEDDES, President 

NEW HAVEN, Conn 13% Collls Str««t 

(Continued on Pag* 11) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.50 

Advertising; Hates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office, Martime Hall Bldg., 

59 Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
t he Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of (he paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1920. 



'BETTER AMERICANS"? 



We have had the "Citizens' Alliance" 
and the "Commercial Federation." Then 
we had the "United Americans." And 
now we have the "Better America Fed- 
eration." 

The last named society, now flourishing 
in Southern California, has apparently 
fallen heir to all the stupidity and all the 
vices of every defunct anti-labor organiza- 
tion in America. 

An intimate expression of the "better 
America" idea is given in a pamphlet just 
issued by the Federation. 

In this "outline of arguments," the 
Federation shows what popular education 
in the Federation's dream of a better 
America, should be. "Compulsory educa- 
tion," it tells us, should not be extended 
beyond the fourteenth year, for "the vast 
majority of children finish the eighth 
grade or grammar school at the end of 
their fourteenth year. Unless they are 
intending to follow some vocation, requir- 
ing a superior education, there is no 
practical wisdom in extending their school 
period by compulsion beyond that. As a 
matter of fact, it is unwise, and results 
frequently in a handicap rather than an 
advantage in their future advance." 

Education a handicap! Who can beat it? 

Tn the Federation's ideal of a better 
America, the "larger leisure" is evidently 
to be discouraged. The Federation's "brief 
outline" sets forth that "an investigation 
made in the large manufacturing districts 
in the East as to the manner in which 
the greater leisure operated, developed 
the fact that it was detrimental to the 
morals, efficiency and general morale, and 
was productive of the usual results of 
idle hours. Satan," sagely continues "brief 
outlines." "finds some „ mischief still for 
idle hands to do, and not merely mischief 
but unquestionably evil." In the coming 
better America, therefore, the larger 
leisure, for the wage-earner's own good is 
to be denied him. 

Down with the shorter workday ! It 
gives Satan a chance to get in his pois- 
oned arrow. 



"Given a temperament of lofty ideals," 
"brief outlines," tells us, "worthy ambi- 
tions, and no abuse may be found from 
any relaxation of physical work. But the 
question must be considered in its relation 
to the mass and not to the exceptions." 

In the Federation's better America, 
woman's right to do night work is not 
to be abridged. "Brief outlines" tells us 
that "No rightminded man or woman 
wants to have women compelled to work 
nights, and there is no way they can be 
compelled to do so against their wishes, 
except the stress of poverty and dire ne- 
cesisty." To deny them the right to do 
so, however, is according to the Better 
America Federation, "an abrogation of 
their fundamental right, and a denial of 
'equality of opportunity'." 

There you have it, boys, in a nutshell. 
If anybody, man or woman, wants to 
work twenty-four hours a day — by heck, 
it's their "fundamental right." And the 
self-styled "better Americans" are going 
to see to it that there is no interference 
by labor unions. 

But it was ever thus. And were it not 
for the saving sense of humor one would 
almost be warranted to lose his temper. 

Happily, in the long run, the plain 
people can always be depended upon to 
see through the mask of these exploiters 
of Americanism. 



DOINGS IN JAPAN. 



According to press dispatches the organ- 
ized seamen of Japan have begun a move- 
ment to combat the importing of 
Chinese sailors to man Japanese merchant 
ships. Japanese sailors see a menace in a 
new step on the part of the shipowners to 
reduce the cost of running their steamers 
by employing unskilled and cheaper Chi- 
nese labor. 

The agitation started when the Japanese 
found that their employing companies 
were discharging more and more of their 
fellow-seamen and replacing them with 
Chinese. 

Members of Japanese crews say that 
the Japanese shipowners were very glad to 
get their services during the war when 
the German submarine menace was present 
and skilled labor was necessary. "We 
safeguarded their ships during the war," 
the seamen said in a public statement, 
"and now that the danger is past, they 
feel secure and suddenly turn thrifty, dis- 
missing their own countrymen for Chinese 
labor." 

The plea offered by the shipowners is 
that the Japanese seamen are inclined to 
start labor trouble on long voyages. They 
say, also, that the condition of shipping 
has made necessary a cut in wages, and 
for this reason the Japanese labor has 
been let out in some cases. 

The seamen of Japan say they will 
make a fight for legislation to keep Chi- 
nese competition out of the shipping field. 

It is refreshing to note, in this con- 
nection, that the delegate of the Japanese 
seamen at the recent Genoa conference 
fought strenuously for the eight-hour day 
for all seamen, including the men in the 
steward's department. 

Here is a part of delegate Okasaki's 
speech when he opposed an amendment to 
the "draft convention" under which the 



cooks and stewards were to be denied 

the eight-hour workday : 

I fail to see any reason for imposing seventy 
hours on the steward's department. It has been 
claimed that the real wishes of the stewards are 
not known and it has been even suggested that 
the stewards wish to work long hours. This 
has been refuted by the Australian Delegate 
and I, on behalf of the Japanese seamen, 
wish to assure you that our seamen insist on 8 
hours per day and 48 hours per week and our 
stewards do not wish to be treated differently 
from others. They have a right to be treated 
on an equal basis with their comrades aboard 
vessel. They maintain that the work in the 
steward's department could be carried on by 
the same limitation of hours and that it is 
only a force of habit that makes some people 
doubt as to the possibility of the application 
of the time limit to the catering department. 

Coming from a Japanese seaman this 
is most encouraging talk. And if all 
signs do not fail, "cheap labor" shipowners 
are going to find it more and more diffi- 
cult in the future to procure crews in 
Japan and other countries of Asia. 



COAL AND THE LEAGUE 



Data compiled by the British Coal As- 
sociation shows that the world's produc- 
tion of coal during 1919 stood at the lowest 
figure since 1910. The total production 
last year was 1,170,000,000 metric tons, 
lower by 10,000,000 than the figures for 
1910, and a decrease of 171,000,000 tons 
as compared wkh the figures for 1913. 
Great Britain was responsible for nearly a 
third of this decrease in production, her 
output dropping from 292,000,000 metric 
tons in 1913 to 237,000,000 tons in 1919. 
The United States was the only country 
to show an increase. 

It is significant, in this connection, that 
the recent Congress of the International 
Miners' Federation (the first one since the 
war) has requested the International Labor 
Office of the League of Nations "to under- 
take to find the best method of establish- 
ing an International Coal Office for the 
purpose of securing a more equitable dis- 
tribution of coal throughout the world." 

The Director General of the Interna- 
tional Labor Office, who was present at 
the session during which the creation of 
an International Coal Bureau was decided 
upon, made it clear that the distribution of 
coal in accordance with the. needs of vari- 
ous nations would in no way modify or alter 
existing agreements arrived at by virtue of 
the Treaty of Peace or of the Spa Confer- 
ence and that such a task could only be car- 
ried out in co-operation with other branches 
of the League of Nations. He stated, how- 
ever, that subject to these reservations he 
was ready to respond to the appeal made by 
the Miners' Congress and agreed to bring 
the matter before the Governing Body of 
the International Labor Office at its next 
meeting on October 5th of this year. 

The hope has been expressed that such an 
International Coal Bureau will eliminate 
much of the present loss and waste involved 
by defective organization of distribution and 
transport of coal throughout the world. Yet, 
since America is the only country where pro- 
duction of coal has increased, and since 
America is not in the League, it is difficult 
to understand how the end sought can be 
accomplished. Perhaps it will be said that 
this is one good reason why America 
should get into the League and thus be- 
come identified with the International 
Labor Organization. But let us not forget 
that in such event "the equitable distribu- 
tion of coal" would be largely dominated 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL) 



by Great Britain and her colonies. Why? 
Because the latter would have twenty- 
four votes against four for the United 
States of America. 



PACIFIC COAST OIL. 



PROGRESS OF U. S. SHIPPING 






America now uses more than twenty times 
as much oil per capita as other countries, 
and this demand has reached such a point 
that oil now controls money instead of money 
controlling- oil. Since we to-day require over 
20 per cent, of the world's output, and have 
less than one-eighth as much oil in the 
ground as the rest of the world, we are 
demanding four times as much oil as all the 
other countries of the world put together. 

For this reason, it is impossible for the 
Pacific Coast to expect any help from other 
parts of the country, even where other fuels 
are available, while, due to our lack of other 
fuel, the present reduction of our oil stocks 
is a particularly serious matter. 

K. B. Kingsbury, president of the Standard 
Oil Company of California, has outlined the 
Pacific Coast situaiton to the California Rail- 
road Commission as follows: 

The Pacific Coast supply of fuel oil and 
petroleum products is rapidly approaching ex- 
haustion. Since May 1, 1915, crude oil stocks 
in California have decreased from over 60,000,000 
barrels to 28,738,921 barrels on March 1, 1920. 

The available supply of crude oil in stock is 
to-day less than 13,000,000 barrels. 

At the present rate of consumption and of 
production of California fuel oil the available 
stock will be exhausted in about twelve months, 
at which time consumers of California fuel oil 
will be cut off from between 25,000 to 30,000 
barrels per day. 

The condition is not a temporary one, but 
the culmination of a steady growth. 

So America has become an oil importing 
country and this has given additional stimu- 
lus for the building of tankers. The Union 
Oil Company of California is building three 
of these vessels in the yards of the South- 
western Shipbuilding Company, at a total 
cost of approximately $6,100,000. Two of 
the tankers are of 12,000 deadweight tons, 
will cost some $2,250,000 each, and will ply, 
in conjunction with other vesesls now owned 
by the company, between the Mexican oil 
fields at Tampico and Pacific Coast ports, 
not only in California, but alos in South 
America. 

The third vessel is of 7500 deadweight 
tons and will cost approximately $1,600,000. 

The first 12,000-tonner is expected to be 
delivered about the end of the year, and 
the second from six to eight weeks later. 
The 7500-ton vessel, for the distribution 
service, should be ready next July, and will 
be built to carry approximately 17,000 bar- 
rels of refined oils and 35,000 barrels of 
fuel oil. The two 12,000-ton vessels will re- 
quire about forty-four days for a round trip 
between Tampico and Los Angeles. Vessels 
will start from Tampico with nearly 85,000 
barrels of oil cargo, of which 10,000 barrels 
will be used for bunkering, with the result 
of a net delivery of 75,000 barrels of Mexi- 
can crude oil at the port of Los Angeles 
every trip. If the tonnage situation permits, 
two cargoes or more per month will move 
from Tampico to California. 

This will help materially to supply Cali- 
fornia with much needed oil and incidentally 
give steady employment to a number of 
seamen. 



With the "purchasing power" in her 
pocket and the union label in her heart, 
woman reigns with the olive branch. She 
is mistress of the situation. 



American Merchant Marine and Foreign Trade 

Advancing to Honored Position Held 

Before Civil War 



For the first time in sixty years the United 
States is no longer dependent upon foreign 
shipping to carry the bulk of its exports and 
imports, as according to the tonnage figures of 
the Department of Commerce more than 50 
per cent, of the foreign commerce of the coun- 
try is being carried in vessels flying the Amer- 
ican flag. These figures, which cover all en- 
trances and clearances of vessels at American 
ports, show that for the fiscal year ended June 
30 last, American ships entered and cleared in 
the foreign trade aggregated 55,240,000 net tons. 
Vessels of all other nations combined totaled 
53,252,000 tons, giving American shipping a lead 
of almost 2,000,000 tons. 

How great the gain has been since the be- 
ginning of the war is instanced by the fact that 
instead of the lead of 2,000,000 tons shown for 
the year recently ended the total American 
shipping movement for the year ended June 30, 
1914, was nearly 52,000,000 tons less than that 
of all the vessels under foreign flags engaged 
in trade with this country. 

For the year ended June 30, 1919, the aggre- 
gate of American entries and clearances was 
10,800,000 tons below the total for foreign ves- 
sels, so that the gain for American shipping 
during the fiscal year just closed over the pre- 
vious one was nearly 13,000,000 tons. 

How great the advance has been is indicated 
by the following figures adapted from the rec- 
ords of the Department of Commerce, showing 
the combined entries and clearances, in net tons, 
of American and foreign vessels for the vears 
ended June 30, 1914, 1919 and 1920. 

American 
1914 27,470,000 

1919 41,020,000 

1920 55,240,000 

Commenting on this condition of affairs, the 

New York Tribune says: 

"Gratifying as is the advance shown by these 
figures, however, there is room for a much 
greater expansion in the proportion of our own 
trade carried in our own vessels. We now con- 
trol, roughly, about two-thirds of our own 
commerce by sea with other North American 
countries and somewhat less than three-fifths 
of the trade with South America. Of the 
trade with Europe, however, the movement in 
American ships is only about a third of the 
total and we still carry considerable less than 
an even share of our commerce with Asia, 
Africa and Oceania. 

Progress in Last Year 

"The last year, however, has brought notable 
progress for American shipping and a conse- 
quent recession in the proportion of our trade 
transported in foreign bottoms. While the per- 
centage of American ships moving to and ar- 
riving from other North American countries 
remained the same as in the previous fiscal year, 
substantial sains were recorded in all other 
directions, as the following percentages of 
American and foreign shipping entering and 
clearing American ports during the last two 
fiscal years indicate: 

American 

1920 1919 

North America 65.2 65.2 



Foreign 
79,101,000 
51,855,000 
53,252,000 



45.8 



Foreign 

1920 1919 

34.8 34.8 
42.7 54.2 
66.6 86.7 

62.9 86.3 
57.1 62.6 
67.3 78.5 
49.1 54.8 



South America 57.3 

Europe 33.4 13.3 

Asia 37.1 13.7 

Oceania 42.9 37.4 

Africa 32.7 21.5 

World 50.9 45.2 

"Development of the trade with Europe in 
American vessels is a notable feature of the 
returns, for it is in this trade that American 
shipping faces the greatest number of competi- 
tors. With the exception of Japan and this 
country, practically every maritime nation of 
importance is European. Despite these condi- 
tions, however, the volume of our shipping 
trading between this country and Europe was 
more than 9.000.000 tons greater during the 
fiscal year 1920 than for the previous one, while 
for the same period foreign shipping showed a 
decrease of about 100,000 tons. 

"A striking expansion in overseas trade is 
found in analyzing the distribution of the move- 
ment of American shipping. For the fiscal year 
1919 the American vessels trading between the 
United States and North and South American 
countries aggregated more than 87 per cent, of 
the American total. For the 1920 fiscal year, 
however, the overseas trade in American bot- 
toms comprised about 30 per cent, of the total, 
compared with 13 per cent, for the previous 
year. The broadening out of American ship- 
ping is further instanced by a decrease of about 
28 per cent, in the proportion of trade with 
other North American countries. The changes 
in the apportionment percentages of the Amer- 
ican shipping movements in the two years were 
as follows: 

1920 

North America 64.1 

South America 6.2 

Europe 24.6 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



1919 

81.9 

5.4 

10.1 



OFFICIAL 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 27, 1920. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Andrew Furuseth presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping medium; members ashore 
plentiful. Quarterly Finance Committee was 
elected to examine the Union's account for the 
past three months. The following members were 
elected delegates to the Twenty-first Annual 
Convention of the California State Federation of 
Labor, to convene at Fresno, Cal., on the 4th 
day of October, 1920: Ed. Andersen, R. Ing- 
wardsen, C. George Larsen, C. F. May, Harry 
Olsen and Paul Scharrenberg. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 
Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS 



Members at San Francisco must not ship 
themselves to join vessels at Agencies. Those 
that do will be required to conform to Shipping 
Rules of Agencies. 

This rule adopted at regular meeting, San 
Francisco, Cal., August 30, 1920. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 

Secretary, p. t. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 20, 1920. 
Shipping very dull; prospects uncertain. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 20, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 20, 1920. 
Shipping dull; full shipwreck benefit was 
awarded to the members of the crew of the 
schooner "Charles E. Moody." 

P. B. GILL. Agent. 
84 Seneca Street. P.O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 20, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 20, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN. Agent. 
88»/ 2 Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 20, 1920. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^2 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 13, 1920. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JOSEPH FALTUS, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 22, 1920. 

Shipping fair; elected Eugene Burke delegate to 
Cal. State Federation of Labor Convention to 
be held at Fresno, Cal., Oct. 4, 1920; elected 
a Finance Committee to go over the finances 
of the Union for the past quarter; shipping 
slow on coasting vessels, slow on off-shore. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
No. 42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 16, 1920. 
Shipping quiet. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room No. 203. P. O. 
Box 214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro, Sept. 15, 1920. 
No meeting; few members ashore; shipping fair. 
JOSEPH MACK, Agent. 
No. 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 54. Phone 
Sunset 547-W. 



Holding that the Department of Commerce 
reports should show the tonnage as well as 
the value of the cargo movements through 
each custom district, the Seattle Port Com- 
mission has adopted a resolution introduced 
several weeks ago, to submit the proposal to 
the annual conventions of the National Associ- 
ation of Port Authorities and the Pacific Coast 
Port Authorities. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ON THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Contributed by the Atlantic and Gulf Seamen's Unions 



THE POWER OF DISCIPLINE 

Two many merchant marine officers to 
day overestimate their disciplinary powers: 
too many young merchant seamen under- 
rate their disciplinary obligations. In this 
important particular there is much mis- 
understanding "it both sides, hence much 
contention and confusion <>i ideas as to 
who is boss. 

The brass-bound novice on the bridge, 
puffed up with an exalted sense of his 
own importance, ofttimes seems to believe 
that buttons create an admiral, while the 
novice in the forecastle, trying out his first 
suit of oil skins, is inclined to regard the 
merchant marine as only a job, entitling 
him to the same freedom of conduct which 
he enjoyed ashore. 

Both are wrong. The powers of a mas- 
ter over his crew are defined by law and 
established both by custom and the exi- 
gencies of the service: whereas the powers 
of an admiral on board his ship are abso 
lute and undefined by any established au- 
thority except the despotism of war. 

'fhe duties and obligations of a seaman, 
on the other hand, are established by law 
and, to some extent, decreed by custom. 

'fhe rules of naval, or nautical etiquette. 
are arbitrarily decreed by custom and 
change not. 

for a naval seaman to refuse, or negiect 
to salute by touching his cap upon meet 
ing an officer, would he an offense calling 
for immediate punishment, though we 
doubt very much if anyone could fmd a 
law on the subject. 

'fhe salute is a time-honored courtesy 
toward a superior officer, but still more an 
act of homage to the service. 

In the merchant marine, where the rules 
are less stringent and the seamen are not 
hound by oath to the service, discipline 
may he mure lax. hut the rule- exis4 never- 
theless, and can he enforced on occasions 
as well. To refuse to "sir" an officer might 
he taken in some quarters not only to 
imply an intentional slight or affront to 
the individual, hut as an insult to the 
service. 

In these- suspicious times when so many 
both in ami out of the service are rightly 
or wrongly suspected of disloyalty, it well 
behooves every loyal and law-abiding 
American seaman to behave COlirteousl) 
toward his superior officer on all occasions 
while in service. 

That the officer in question may not 
always merit respect does not matter. It 
is not a question of whether he is a gen 
tleman or not. hut whether I am one. I: 
he is unworthy, look over his head and 
salute the flag. He'll never realize the 
difference. J.\MES II. WILLIAMS. 



JACK JOE 

At the regular weekly meeting of the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Association, held 
at headquarters on September 7. 1920. the 
horrors of the "Puacko" incidents, the mur- 
ders and diabolical atrocities committed by 
demon Petersen and his bloodthirsty sons 
upon their helpless crew during the mem- 



oyage of the "Puacko" from Vic- 

1 '-. I .. to Cape T"w n, South Africa. 

tin revived and vividly recalled b) 

the presence in the meeting of little Jack 

the unfortunate Kanaka boy who was 

so brutally beaten and horribly maltreated 

by the three unprincipled brutes that In 

is broken and crippled for life. Jack Joe, 

a handsome little Kanaka hoy. is scarcely 

live feet tall, hut he must have had the 

constitution of a rock to have withst 1 

the unbelievable tortures and unheard-of 
maltreatment to which he was subjected 
at the hands of those unhung mot 
in human form. 

Jack Joe's story beggars all description 
and parses all belief. Even in the height 
of the hell ship days we can recall no sim- 
ilar atrocity. 

Comrade J. Campbell, who was present. 
also a member of the "Pua< 
crew and he corroborated Jack Joe's re- 
cital to the last detail. Comrade Campbell 
also spoke in the highest terms of little 
foe, both a.- a shipmate and a man. and 
added that he was the best witness 
the Government at the trial. 

'fhe precious Petersen trio have escaped 
the capital punishment they deserved, but 
they can never hope to escape the fearful 
retribution of Divine Justice, which is 
sure to overtake them both here and here- 
after, for vengeance is mine. I will repay, 
saith the Lord of Hosts! 

Little Jack Joe came to us in a pitiful 
condition. Since the "trial" of the 
"Puacko" murderers. Jack had been tenta 
tively employed as man of all work about 
the building and offices occupied by Mr. 
Silas B. Axtell, attorn ey-at-law ; hut finally. 
having apparently concluded that there 
was no longer any hope of maintaining a 
successful damage suit in Joe's behalf 
either against the "Puacko" or her owners, 
he was constrained to let him go with a 
good recommendation and best wishes for 

his future success. 

Joe came to us completely destitute and 
pleaded for relief, and he didn't come to 
the wrong place. His diminutive size, his 
straightforward though broken sentences 
as he told his appalling story, his broken 
and distorted body and likable personality 
and unwavering disposition, all appealed 
i" the deepest sentiments of ever} man in 
the hall. 

A motion to pass the bonnet for his 
relief until it could be seen what further 
could be done, met with unanimous favor 
and applause. 

\^ it happened to he only an ordinary 
business meeting, the gathering was not 
a large one. hut the tarpaulin muster net- 
£41.08, sufficient to keep little Jack 
off the street and out of lawyer's offices 
long enough for his cause to he considered 
by real men. 

James 1 1. Willi vmS. 



OFFICIAL 



A number of our business agents along 

the Atlantic and Gulf coasts have written 
in latch requesting a larger supply of 



Journals each week. In most cases double 
supplies are requested. 

It is very gratifying to learn that the 
Journal is increasing in popularity and 
demand, and we take this opportunity to 
inform all our agents that they are fully 
authorized to order JOURNALS according to 
their needs direct from the Business Man- 
ager. Maritime Hall Building. 59 (lay 
Street, San Francisco, Calif.: at the same 
time informing their several headquarters 
in New York of the increase. 

J. II. W. 
Special Notice 

'fhe following notice has been received 
from Comrade Adolf Kile. Baltimore agent 
of the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion : 

"fhe hos'u or any other members of 
the deck crew who were in the S. S. 
Iloxcil' at the time that Knut Engstrom 
fell into the hold and was injured are 
hereby respectfully requested to commu- 
nicate with George T. Mister. Esq., Attor- 
ney at-l. aw. Law building. Baltimore, Md." 
Obituary 

fhe following sad tidings also come to 
US from Comrade Kik- in the same com 
munication : 

On the night of Sept. 4. 1920, Comrade 
C. K. Gerritsen, 2565, Sailors' Association, 
was held up by two negroes and -hot 
through the heart by one of them. 

Not having been a full member of the 
Union, Comrade Gerritsen was buried 
from the branch hall by general subscrip- 
tion among the members. 

Since Comrade Kile does not state in 
his letter whether or not the perpetrators 
of tin- foul crime were apprehended, we 
take it for granted that they made good 
their escape — as usual. I. II. W. 



HARBORS OF THE GOLDEN HORN 



i onstantinople has a future part to 
play as one of the greatest trade centers 
id' the Near East. fhe tonnage trading 
with ('onstantinople itself is heavy. In ad- 
dition to this, most of the thousands of 
ships that yearly cross the Straits, going 
or coming from Black Sea or Mediterra- 
nean ports, touch at some port of the 
l rolden Tforn. 

Men who have watched developments in 
the Near Easi for years are unanimous in 
predicting that in the next few decades 
the Black Sea and eastern Mediterranean 
ports will he a phenomenal development 
never before equaled in the annals of that 
part of the globe. With them Constanti- 
nople is hound to develop with unprece- 
dented swiftness. 

Practically the only spot in the Golden 
Horn where careful and systematic dredg- 
ing has been done is that next the landing- 
place of Calata, on the seaward side of 
Galata I '.ridge. lint this area is so re- 
stricted that only a few ships at a time 
can he accommodated there. 

With the resumption of steamship pas- 
r traffic in the eastern Mediterranean 
cargo Imats rarely find berths at the land 
ing. Indeed, most of the time only a 

small proportion of incoming passenger 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



liners unload directly ashore, anchoring in- 
stead out in the Horn and resorting- to the 
services of the traditional little four-oared 
caiques for both passengers and their 
baggage. 

Harbor building on any appreciable 
scale has not been among the strong 
points of Turkish administration. Cranes, 
modern warehouses, and grain elevators 
are conspicuously absent from the landing 
places of the Golden Horn. Yet several 
sets of cranes could handle the day's ton- 
nage in from two to three hours of work, 
minus the vast amount of labor now nec- 
essary and the enormous expenditure of 
steam power involved in keeping the light- 
ers on the move. 

One of the arguments which the Turks 
employ, in urging American investors to 
come to Constantinople, is that specimens 
of American "pep" displayed in the work 
of the Red Cross have convinced the Turks 
that America is the nation who can give 
Turkey the docks and harbors she will 
need in the near future. Moreover, they 
point out. America is the only country 
with sufficient capital to invest in harbor 
improvements. 



MUNICIPAL "LABOR SATURDAY." 



Water transportation has seen an in- 
teresting development in Soviet Russia. 
One of the new means of dealing with this 
traffic, according to the latest news, has 
been the introduction of municipal "Labor 
Saturdays" by local Soviets when thou- 
sands of workers, liberated for the purpose 
from other work, participate in the loading 
and unloading of barges and steamers and 
the repair of water craft. On June 19, 
9,415 persons in Petrograd helped to un- 
load timber and other freight. About 
10,000 took part in similar work on June 
26. At that time, about 30,000 cubic feet 
had accumulated in Petrograd, and the 
question of organizing a "wood unloading 
week" was under discussion. A "Saturday 
Commission" of skilled workers also was 
formed to effect repairs. Participation in 
this work seems to be entirely voluntary, 
since the district committee draws up list 
of sympathizers among the skilled workers 
and apportions them to the repair plants- 
in need of their help. The "registration" 
of material at the wharves is another form 
ol such communal work in which on one 
Saturday one thousand men took part. 
The Petrograd Commune has agreed to 
increase the food ration for all workers 
taking part in the "Saturdays"; apart from 
this there seems to be no compensation. 

The opening of navigation on the Volga, 
on June 1, also led to a great shortage of 
dock workers. At Xijni-Novgorod, a 
working force of 1.200 to 1,300 skilled 
longshoremen proved entirely inadequate, 
and the local committee applied to the 
central government for the assistance of 
2,000 "red" army soldiers and 1,500 men 
from the compulsory labor camps. The 
principal freights in addition to timber — 
which only partly is floated — were food- 
stuffs, salt, metals, fish, cotton, medica- 
ments, pyritc. petroleum and coal (com- 
paratively little of the last named). A 
petroleum flotilla and thirty steamers for 
timber transportation are mentioned. 

This effort, ol course, does not lessen 



the urgent need of Soviet Russia for rolling 
stock and engines. Under the direction 
of Prof. Lomonossoff — well known in the 
United States — who is again director of 
the railroads, a supreme effort is being 
made to repair locomotives. In May, a 
total of 598, belonging to 18 different rail- 
roads, were thus put back into use. — The 
Survey. 



MAYFLOWER RELICS. 

In the course of a lecture before the 
Mayflower committee at London a short 
time ago, a part of the original timbers of 
the famous little ship which brought the 
Pilgrim Fathers to these shores was ex- 
hibited by Dr. Rendel Harris, a prominent 
British Quaker. 

Experts who examined the timbers pro- 
nounced them at least 300 years old and 
said they had evidently belonged to a ship 
of the size of the Mayflower. 

The timbers were found built in as a 
part of a barn on what is known as the 
"old Jordan farm," in Buckinghamshire, 
where William Pcnn is buried. There is 
a large Quaker colony in that district. Old 
records show that a former owner of the 
Jordan farm in the seventeenth century 
owned a quarter interest in the Mayflower 
and that the celebrated old vessel was con- 
verted into a whaling ship about 1654 and 
was used in the whaling trade off the coast 
of Greenland. 

Dr. Harris promised to reveal the details 
of the secret at a conference to be held 
at Plymouth in the near future. 

The timbers include oaken beams thought 
by Dr. Harris originally to have formed 
part of the hull and deck of the Mayflower. 
Some of the beams, which are worn and 
worm-eaten, bear marks indicating that 
they might at one time have held ship's 
rivets and tackle. 

According to the London Mail, there is 
a local theory that a Quaker formerly 
lived in the neighborhood who was a pro- 
fessional shipbreaker, selling ship's timbers 
to farmers in the surrounding country. It 
has been suggested that this man broke up 
the Mayflower and sold the timbers to the 
then owner of the Jordan property. 

Dr. Harris' discovery is fraught with 
great historical significance for Americans, 
especially just at this time, when the ter- 
centenary celebration of the arrival of the 
Mayflower off the Massachusetts coast is 
in progress. — Salt Lake Tribune. 



SPECULATORS AND CULTIVATORS. 



Japanese land purchases in California, 
which are making Californians nervous, 
are one of the results of encouraging land 
speculation. The Japanese must be buying 
the land for use since otherwise the pur- 
chases would not bring about an increase 
in California's Japanese population. They 
must be paying the price demanded by 
white owners. The price must be more 
than Caucasian settlers can pay or consider 
it profitable to pay as otherwise the lands 
would not be for sale. In other words. 
California maintains a land system that 
discourages settlement by those accustomed 
to Caucasian standards of living but does 
not discourage Japanese. The latter are 

willing to accept the margin remaining 



after complying with the California land 
speculators' demands. The Caucasian is 
not. If the land speculators were forced 
to let go Caucasians could go to work 
without payment of exorbitant tribute and 
would certainly do so. Japanese settle- 
ment would become a comparatively negli- 
gible quantity without special legislation 
to bring this about. California has the 
chance to accomplish this object. An initi- 
ative measure is pending providing for ap- 
plication of the single tax. If adopted the 
speculators holding lands out of use, while 
awaiting purchasers at prices that can be 
paid profitably by none but workers with 
oriental standards of living, would be 
forced to let go. The land would be 
open to white settlers. These could get 
possession on terms requiring payment of 
a tax "to the State equal to the annual 
rental value. That would be the only tax 
they would be required to pay. The tax 
would be on the bare unimproved land 
value Only. The value of improvements 
would not be considered. All production 
above the amount required to pay ground 
rental would go to producers free of taxa- 
tion and of tribute in any form. The 
standard of living need not then be lowered. 
On the contrary, workers could live much 
better than at present. The single tax 
amendment offers Californians the choice 
between the present system, which must 
sooner or later force them to Japanese 
standards, even if Japanese immigration 
ceases, and the single tax, which will make 
California a better place for workers to 
live in. 



The highest steam-navigated body of 
water in the world is Lake Titicaca, which 
lies at an altitude of 12,545 fett, partly in 
Peru and partly in Bolivia. 



Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text-books and compul- 
sory education. 

.?. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in tiie twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

X. The municipal ownership of public utili- 
ties. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and 
telephone. 

1.1. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man 
suffrage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public hath 
Sj stem in all cities. 

IS. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
;s will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain, 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER 

(By Laurence Todd) 



Deadly dull apathy, tempered by cyni- 
cism, marks the political temper of Amer- 
ican labor as the presidential campaign 
draws to a close. Except in Wisconsin, 
where La Follette and the Plumb Plan 
League and the organized farmers fought 
and narrowly won a hard battle against 
the reactionaries; and except in Georgia, 
where railroad and cotton mill labor 
turned out for Tom Watson ; and in New 
York City, where the five Socialist assem- 
blymen have been re-elected to fill the 
vacancies caused by their expulsion from 
the Legislature — except in these three in- 
stances, the events of the campaign have 
been without encouragement to the im- 
mediate hopes of the various labor ele- 
ments supporting- Cox, Christensen or 
Debs. 

Already the heads of the big national 
and international unions are looking ahead 
to the time when the ballots shall have 
been counted, and wdien it will appear that 
millions of wage workers have stayed away 
from the polls. A sweeping victory for 
Harding and the more violently reaction- 
ary business element is taken for granted. 
Gary and Morgan are going to be in power 
to a greater degree than ever before. "The 
iron heel" is the prediction of the Repub- 
lican policy toward labor which is most 
frequently expressed by labor officials 
coming into Washington from the West 
and from New England. Unless some tre- 
mendous change shall take place in the 
attitude of the wage workers of the United 
States before election day, the next Con- 
gress will be even more stupid and brutal 
in its warfare upon organized labor than 
the present Congress has been. The 
safety valve upon industrial unrest will be 
chained down. 

There are optimists at A. F. of T.. head 
quarters who say that this condition of 
affairs, if Harding wins, will merely re- 
move the differences within the labor 
movement, and that all of organized labor 
will march in solid phalanx against its ene- 
mies. They say that unionism will thrive 
upon oppression, and that labor will once 
more rally to the good old slogan of pure 
and simple trade unionism, tree from the 
entanglements of political effort. If this 
be their real belief, then it would seem a 
pity to have wasted so much effort in be- 
half of Cox, and to have created so much 
internal dissension by attacks upon the 
Farmer-Labor party and the Socialist 
party. The truth is, of course, that the 
labor movement will be driven to defend 
itself more actively, under a hostile ad- 
ministration, and that instead of surren- 
dering all political power to the employers 
it will at once begin to lay the foundation 
for a new and more practical political fight 
than it is waging this year. 

The two extreme groups — those who 
call themselves radical and those who 
think themselves conservative — who op- 
pose political effort by the organized labor 
movement, are in high feather at the pres- 
ent collapse of the effort to elect a pro- 
labor President of the United States. 
These two classes of direct-actionists look 
forward to a period of strikes — strikes of 
bigger proportions than the country has 
ever seen — during the next year or two. 
They believe there will be no other way 



in which labor can make itself heard by 
the Government. 

If they be right, then the American 
labor movement is due to take up the 
question, next summer, of creating a Gen- 
eral Labor Staff, similar to that which 
British labor has established, to bring to- 
gether for effective action the strike-pro- 
posing authority of all the big and little 
internationals in the A. F. of L. Tt would 
he an extension of tin- plan already put 
into operation by the sixteen railroad or- 
ganizations, and would cover all indus- 
tries and crafts. That would be the log- 
ical outcome of an election in which anti- 
strike fanatics were put in control of Con- 
gress, the White House and the Depart- 
ment of Justice. Such a General Staff 
would sit in Washington or Chicago or 
New York, and would keep constant watch 
over anti-labor moves on the industrial 
chess-board, and would agree upon plans 
for meeting every move. These plans 
would be sent out in the form of "sug- 
gestions" to the responsible executives of 
all organizations, who would be morally 
bound to lay them before their respective 
memberships with their own comment 
added. 

Such a centralization of authority on 
the field of industrial battle will, naturally, 
be delayed as long as possible — just as 
was the choice of Marshal Foch to com- 
mand the British, Italian, American and 
Belgian armies in addition to the French. 
But if the Harding regime turns out as 
"hard-boiled" as it now promises, the labor 
movement will be compelled to adopt a 
plan of campaign to save itself from seri- 
ous damage. 

What little enthusiasm had been aroused 
in behalf of Cox among labor men was 
dampened when the President rejected the 
appeal of the anthracite miners for a re- 
vision of the unfavorable wage award 
made by his commission at Scranton. To 
some extent they had forgotten or forgiven 
the crushing blow delivered against the 
bituminous miners last November by the 
President and his Attorney-General and 
Federal Judge Anderson of Indianapolis. 
But this second instance of the repression 
of the miners brought back the memory 
of that earlier wrong, and the political 
committee of the A. F. of L. immediately 
felt the reaction. To-day the campaign is 
dead. Wilson and Palmer and Burleson 
are millstones around the neck of Cox, 
even in spite of the fact that Cox has 
never sympathized with the anti-labor 
moves of this administration. 

One reason for the belief that a Large 
part of the labor vote will stay away from 
the polls in November is the lavish use of 
money by the Republican Old Guard. 
There is talk, for example, of the use of 
half a million for the renomination of Len- 
root in Wisconsin, and more than that for 
Wadswbrth in New York, while in Minne- 
sota the Steel Trust is said to be prepar- 
ing to turn loose a million to control the 
Legislature against the Non-partisan 
League and State Federation of Labor, 
whose program includes a tonnage tax on 
iron ore that would cost the trust $3,500,- 
000 a year. All over the country the im- 
pression gains ground that the White 
House and the capitol have been put up 
at auction, and that the war profiteers, 
hatched by the Democrats and Republic- 
ans in Congress, have handed back enough 



money to assure the purchase of every 
public office worth holding against the 
wage workers. The Democrats have some 
money, particularly in the cities, but it 
is only the anti-labor Democrats wdio con- 
trol it. and they will use it to the mutual 
satisfaction of both the old gangs. 

Turning from the dismal spectacle of 
the political wreckage to the cheering pic- 
ture of a big union in convention, you find 
the International Association of Machin- 
ists, meeting in quadrennial convention in 
Rochester, with a membership well above 
300,000, and predicting from 400,000 to 
500.000 by 1924. During 1918 they organ- 
ized 287 new lodges: in 1919 they added 
269 more; in the first six months of the 
present year, in spite of slack industry, 
they formed 102 new lodges. Last De- 
cember they had 338,000 members, but 
there was a falling off in the early months 
of 1920, and now the tide has turned again. 

The finances of the Machinists arc in 
good condition. During 1919 the receipts 
from local lodges by the grand lodge were 
$2,705,034, of which much the larger part 
was received in the last half of the year. 
For the first half of 1920 the receipts were 
$1,900,000, which was $880,000 more than 
in the first half of 1919. 

Secretary-Treasurer Davison's report to 
the convention tells of the investment of 
a large sum of the Machinists' money in 
capital stock of the Commercial National 
Bank — the second strongest bank in Wash- 
ington — and of the election of himself and 
President Johnston as directors of the 
bank. Their experience there caused them 
to join with others in establishing the Ml. 
Vernon Savings Bank in the new Machin- 
ists' Building, and this savings bank has 
in its first 90 days made the phenomenal 
record of rolling up over $1,000,000 in de- 
posits. When the Norfolk business crowd 
recently refused credit to certain small 
shops that refused to join in the non- 
union-shop movement, the bank controlled 
by the Machinists came to the aid of 
these fair employers with abundant funds, 
and smashed the anti-union campaign 
there. 

In his recommendations for changes in 
policy and constitution of the organiza- 
tion. Davison says : 

"It will be noted that there has been 
more than a million and a half dollars ex- 
pended in strike benefits within the period 
covered by this report CIS months). In 
many instances, in my opinion, the purpose 
sought to be accomplished has not been 
accomplished. I believe a change of pol- 
icy should be adopted and our laws 
changed so they would permit of the han- 
dling of industrial disputes in a different 
manner. I believe we should enter the 
co-operative movement, and where it is 
sary and where the funds of the or- 
ganization will permit, that in fighting an- 
tagonistic employers we enter the machine 
basis. The amount of money expended for 
strike benefits, if invested in machinery 
and plants, would, in my opinion, have es- 
tablished higher standards with less loss 
to our membership than our present meth- 
ods of handling strikes." 

This Rochester convention will probably 
complete a fine act of reparation by the 
Machinists for the sacrifice made for them 
by Thomas J. Savage, one of their execu- 
tive board and one of the ablest and mosl 
aggressive men who sat on the National 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



War Labor Board. Tom Savage, young 
and idealistic and determined to do his 
part in labor's battle, overtaxed his strength 
in the days when the scourge of influenza 
was sweeping the country, and because he 
would not rest from his work on the 
board he fell sick and died. He left a 
young wife and child without means of 
livelihood. The Machinists as individuals 
raised something over $6,000 to buy a 
home for them, and a matter of $420 was 
borrowed from the international funds to 
complete the purchase. This sum will be 
made up by the individual delegates at the 
convention. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3) 



employment of employes because of mem- 
bership or non-membership in labor organ- 
izations." 

As a result of this order, employes of 
the Pennsylvania railroad organized and 
now Mr. Atterbury predicts evil days for 
capital (meaning capitalists) since his spy 
system no longer functions. 

This is the same Mr. Atterbury who 
testified before the Commission on Indus- 
trial Relations in 1915 that in the previous 
year his company spent $800,000, taken from 
the people in the form of freight and pas- 
senger charges, to maintain a private army 
and a Pinkerton spy system to make organ- 
ization of labor impossible. Atterbury 
defended his private army on the ground 
that a State-controlled police force is a 
beautiful theory but does not work in 
practice. 



British Unionists Behind Coal Miners 

Demands of the British Miners' Federa- 
tion for higher wages and lower prices for 
household coal have been refused by the 
government and a strike of vast propor- 
tions is imminent. The miners are asso- 
ciated with the railway men and the dock- 
ers in what is known as the triple alliance. 

Indirectly connected with this move- 
ment is a demand for nationalization of 
the mines, which the coal diggers have 
vigorously urged for the past several 
months. The workers propose joint con- 
trol of the industry by representatives of 
the State and persons engaged in the in- 
dustry. 

The direct demands are wage increases 
and lower prices for coal used by house- 
holders. 

Housing conditions in the mining dis- 
tricts are also involved. The miners say 
that the government has made numerous 
promises that these conditions would be 
improved. In a recent speech President 
Smillie of the Miners' Federation said : 

"It has been proved up to the hilt that 
children in many mining districts have 
been done to death owing to bad houses 
and unsanitary conditions, while generally 
the death rate of children in these districts 
is very high." 

The trade union executive declared that 
this question ought not to be settled by the 
power or the ability of the government 
to beat the miners, or by the ability of the 
miners to beat the government, but it 
should be decided on the justice of the 
claim put forward by the miners. 



where coal miners are making a stand 
against the persistent and brutal tyranny 
of coal owners," says the West Virginia 
Labor News, "is just what the workers 
have been demanding for months. They 
have made several appeals to the Federal 
Government to send soldiers here to re- 
establish constitutional guaranties and 
check the encroachments of the employers 
upon the rights of the citizenship. 

"In certain sections of West Virginia 
the coal owners have been ruling with mob 
law. They have maintained gangs of cut- 
throats who have invaded the lives and 
the properties of every man and woman 
who refused to accept their will as the 
supreme authority. 

"The Government should do more than 
send its troops into the disaffected dis- 
trict. It should institute a sweeping in- 
quiry into the methods of the employers. 
It should insist that the laws and consti- 
tution of the State be respected. It should 
make an end,- for all time, of the system 
of coercion and oppression that has en- 
abled the West Virginia coal owners to 
maintain a state of feudalism and to deny 
to Americans the right that Americans 
elsewhere possess without question or 
hindrance. 

"West Virginia is a festering sore and 
contains enough of menace to justify all 
the attention the Government can give it. 

"It is high time that we know whether 
a group of cold-blooded and inhuman 
mercenaries are more powerful than the. 
Government of this nation. That is the 
issue in West Virginia." 



Soldiers Check Coal Owners' Thugs 
"The sending of troops in West Virginia, 



Millions Made by Banks 

In about three months three New York 
banks made call loans that totaled $335,- 
000,000 and interest charges ranged be- 
tween 18 and 25 per cent., said John Skel- 
ton Williams, comptroller of the currency, 
in a statement supporting the charge 
made by United States Senator Owen, 
who said in an Ohio speech that New 
York banks had loaned $500,000,000 at 
rates up to 30 per cent., and that the banks 
borrowed this money from the Govern- 
ment's Federal Reserve banks for 5, 6 and 
7 per cent. 

New York bankers have criticized Sen- 
ator Owen for making "wild assertions," 
and now the comptroller of the cur- 
rency declares that Senator Owen's claims 
are substantially correct. 

"During the last year," said Mr. Wil- 
liams, "the burdensome and oppressive in- 
terest rates to which the Senator refers 
have been exacted not in 'one or two pos- 
sible insignificant cases,' as one critic ex- 
pressed it, and not 'for about 10 minutes 
one afternoon the middle of last Novem- 
ber,' as another critic stated, but in thou- 
sands of instances, at numerous times and 
upon call loans aggregating hundreds of 
millions of dollars." 



PROGRESS OF U. S. SHIPPING 

(Continued from Page 7) 

Asia 3.4 1.1 

Oceania 1-0 1| 

Africa 7 .3 

"Expansion along the lines shown indicates 
that the American merchant marine is at last 
on the way to secure a fair share of its own 
ocean-carrying trade, and that hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars hitherto paid to foreign ship- 
owners annually will now go to the upbuilding 
of this country's own shipping." 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5) 



LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark Street 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Secretary 

THOS. A. HANSON. Treasurer 

Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. T GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue. Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, WIS CHAS. BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON, Agent 

74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, O S. R. DYE, Agent 

618 Front Street. Phone Bell Navarre 1823 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y J. MURPHY, Agent 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 B. DAFOE, Agent 

3308 E. 92nd Street. Phone South Chicago. 7666 

SUPERIOR, Wis W. EDGEWORTH, Agent 

332 Banks Avenue 

CONNEAUT, O W. J. WILSON, Agent 

992 Day Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 71 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 48 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary 

ED HICKS, Treasurer 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

Phone 428-W 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone Broad 131 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 3308 E. 92nd Street 

Phone South Chicago 7666 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

Phone Bell, Navarre 1823 

CLEVELAND, 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 44 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, HI 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 571 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash ...64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 

DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaska 

UNGA Alaska 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1S8 

FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 

STOCKTON, Cal F. E. McFARLANE, Agent 

46 West Main Street 



Demand the Union Label. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA STEWARDS' UNION 
FRED WALSH, Secretary 

VANCOUVER, B. C 311 Hastings Street, West 

Room 2. Phone Seymour 3976 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



Walter R. Brown, candidate for, 
Governor of Georgia in the recent 
primaries on an anti-union shop, 
platform, made a ridiculous shov 
He failed to carry a lunty 

and ran a poor fourth. 

There is a continual emigra 
into the northern and western - 
owing to the low wane- and poor 
working conditions in Mississippi. 
Trade unionists urge workers to 
unite that conditions may be im- 
proved and they can stay at home. 

The United States Civil Service 
Commission has rilled that it is 

illegal for a Government clerk to do 
extra work for political committees. 
Some Federal employes have made 
extra money by this work, after their | 
regular hours, but this is held to be 
a violation of the rule prohibiting 
Federal employes from engaging in 
politics. 

In a full page advertisement in the' 
Oregon Labor Press, Wells Brothers 
Construction Company thanked the' 
organized building trade- of Porl 
for co-operation in making possible 
the erection of the largest store 
house in the northwest on schedule 
time. The building trades and as- 
sociated contractors have a joint' 
cment and it is declared that 
Portland is the only city in the 
northwest where peace reigns in the 
building industry, and has made 
possible the erection of more build- 
ings in Portland than in any other 
city in the northwest. 

*'.\'o one agency," says the press 
service of the Federal Board for 
Vocational Education, "has had so 
great an influence in perfecting 
cational laws as the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, which sponsored 
the original free public school sys- 
tem, the vocational educational law, 
and the c o m pulsor y part-time 
school law, all of which directly af- 
fects the industrial and commercial 
progress .1 tin- nation. The an- 
nual conventions of the Federation 
always record its position on 
prposed progressive e d u c at i o n a 1 
measures." 

The strike of coal miners in Ala- 
bama is on because the Alabama 

irs' Association b< li 
it is bigger than the Government. 
Miners have been forced. under 
threats of jail for contempt, to 
abide by the terms of the Lexer Act. 
while the coal owners refuse to obey 
Judge Anderson's injunction and in 
many cases will not employ of) 
of miners' unions. The coal owners 
also refuse to accept the scale a 
to last fall by the coal owners, coal 
miners and the Government. About 
half a hundred coal operators have 
epted the scale, but tin- sabotage 
coal owners want to operate on a 
non-union basis. 

' >r,t;am trkers h:i\ e pledged 

$2,000 to tliicr Fresno (Cal.) school 
hers who have been discharged 
and who are now suing the city 
superintendent for slander. It is 
agreed by every one that the teach- 
ers were discharged because of their 
connection with the Teachers' Union, 
which is opposed by the superin- 
tendent. This official, howevex gives 
his reason "official incapacity," 
and the teachers resent a reflection 
against their ability, that will di t r 
them in securing employment in the 
future. The) are without funds and 
when the case was presented to the 

< >il Workei s' I Inion thi ■ 
unionists unanimouslj voted $2,000. 

< >ther trade unii n 
lar action. 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
Juring that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 



Abolln, K. 
Andersen, E. A. 

-1410 
Andersen, J. F. 
Andersen, C. D. 

-1131 

■s, Jack 
Anderson, Karl A. 
Anderson, Gua 
Anderson, K. P. 
\nderson, H. 
Anderson. Jack 

Hack, Soren 
rsaumgartel) A. 

' larkstronj, C. 
Harentes, Joe 
! Wallah, Lee 
nerg. H. J. 

and, Iver 
Harrington, P. 
HfM-Rer, Aug. 
Belmont, Joe 
Bergkvist, Axel 
• n, Blrger 

Carlson, M. -90« 

'arr, A. 

'"nmpbell, John P.. 
riirlstensen, E. O. 

TI. 
i >anlelsen, O. E. 

legerstedt, Karl 
!. Joseph 
Oonovan, J. J. 
Ponnelly, R. A. 

Rrtin. Gust 
iCngherg, O. L. 
Engvall, J. A. 
h, Chas. 
Fernandez, Ellslo 
Pex, Andrew 
Kramnes, Ivar 
•labrlelsen, Peder 
Oaughan. Tom 
Oran, Aksel 
Jravander, Nils 
C.reighan, P. 

Hansen, 8. P. -2794 
Hansen, Nels -2072 
Hansen, Ed. 
Hansen, Edgar 
Hansen, Oscar 
Harms, E. E. 
Haltnes, M. 
Hansen, Frank 

Tnnas. H. A. 
rohnaon, Jack 

■ison, C. 
rohnson, Clarence 

A. 
Facobs, Fulton 
Johnson, E. E. 
fohnson, J. 
Johnson, Harry 
Kallo, K. 
Karlson, Ingvald 
K'arlaon, G. A. -1190 
Karlson, Louis 
Kasklnan, Allurl 
Kalltnan, Frank 
K. N., -1013 
Kempsen, M. 
Kearney. Hugh 
Kerton, Lester 
r.nmpe, Fred 
Larsen, Lars 
Lambert, E. A. 
Larsen, Herman 
Laurltsen, Ludvlg 
Langman, Wm. 
T.eason, J. A. 
Mlquest, Rudolf 
Martinson, Ingvald 
Mattson, Hllding 
Mallne, Stanley 
McLean, Angus 
McVtcar. P. 
Meyer, Frank 
Mickelson, Harry 
Mleklans, J. 
McPherson, R. 
McDonald, J. 
Nelsen, Anton 
Nelsen, H. -1460 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, N. J. 
Nellson, O. 
Oberg, J. 
Ohm, Henrlch 
oisen, Fred A. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, E. O. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, Nick 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, K. M. 
Pettersen, Eric 
Pettersen, Krlstlan 
Petersen, BJarne 
Peterson, Oscar 
Richardaan, J. W. 
Richardson, E. C. 
Rod, S. 
Ruhr. Hans 
Sale, John 
Saarnl, Frank 
Salvesen, T. 
Samuelsen, H. N. 
Schurr, Harm 
Sehelenz. C. 
Scott, W. N. 
Sickjman. A. 
Slnnla, G. 
Slmonsen, I. 
Slnaondaen, H. 



Andersen, O. -1339 

Anderson, J. -665 

Anderson, John 

Anderson, Chris 

Anderson, G. N. B. 

Andersen, Adrian 



B. E. 
Hllmer 



Andersen 
Anderson, 
Alonzo, N. 
Axelsen, Herman 
Axelsen, George 



Bendlxon, Hans 
Berntsen, Nils 
Bingham, Dexter 
Blomgren, Adolf 

1m, A. E. 
Blomgren, Carl 

Andrew 
ien, Jos. 
Brown, H. 
Brown, Martin 
Braun, T. 
Bunden, L. W. 

Chekan, W. 
Clifford. H. W. 
Clair, A. 
Dark. Sterling 

Dunham, Dexter 
Duncan, T. W. 

Dunne. F. 
Dutton, Henry 

Erlkson. Elner 
Erlkson. E. -38 

Franzell, A. 
Fredriksen. B. D. 
Eerslund, Victor 

Graham, E. 
Gragan, J. H. 
■n, J. H. 
Gustafsen, Oscar 
Gusjaas, Oscar 

Hansen, Immanuel 
TTelmer, Fred 
Herlltz, Ivor 
Hlckka, E. J. 
Hasselberg. Gustaf 
Hape, Hans 
TTnopes, Bill 
Hahnqvlst. E. J. 

Johnson, Gatterd 
Johnson, Chris 
Johansen, O. 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, John B 
Jensen, V. J. 
.lorgensen, Adrian 
.Torsensen. D. 
.lultsen, C. A. 
Keane, John 
KIsor, Adlal 
Kelly, John 
Klahn, Karl 
Klenk, K. A. 
Koppen, O. 
Kristensen, N., 1^03 
Kilstensen, K. 
Kukes, Conrad 
Kuten, Alex. 
Llndholm, A. 
Llndstrom, Geo. 
Tdlburger, Wm. 
Llnne, Theodore 
Lokken, O. K. 
T.undsren, Carl 
Lund, Erik 
Lynch. J. P. 
McCoy, J. L. 
McKenzle, Dan. 
Miller, S. 
Monrad, Trvgue 
Molurg, K. G. E. 
Monroe, N. S. 
Mosley, S. E. 
Murphy, Tlins. 
Muler, James 

Nelsen, Oscar 
Newman, J. P 
Nielsen, C. L. 
Norshelm. Ben 
Nordstrom, A. R. 
Olsen, Louis 
Olsen, O. -597 
Odella, V. 
Olsen. Kristin n 
Olsson, K. W. -972 
Owens, James 
O'Donnell, J. 
Person, Johan 
Peel, P. 

Peterson, John E. 
Tlnerd, F. H. 
Pipior.e, J. 
Prinz, Carl 
Runsten, Arthur 
Rylander, R. 
Rysock. M. van 



I.. 



Smith, C. J. 
Smeland, John 
Sommerfeld, P. 
Sohnn, M. 
Soroos, 8. 
Sobel, R. 

nloch. J. 
Strand, C. 
Stuhr, H. M. 
Svenson, Thure 
Bverdrup. Walter 



Sjoberg, G. 
Slandart, M. 
Talce, John 
Tangvalt, G. J. 
Thornqulst, A. 
Unwen, Harry 
Verst, C. A. 
Ward, Fred 
Watson, L. 
Wall, W. 
Whete, R. E. 
Williams, L. A. 
Wilhelmsen, S. 



Synions, W. A. 

Thom, Arvld 
Thor, L 
Thorpe, J. W. 
Vilen, I. 
Vaher, C. 
Wilhelmsen, S. 
Wilson, C. 
Wright, H. 
White, R. E. 
Ylonen, S. 
J. Yorkvelt. A. 



Aberdeen. Wash., Letter List 



Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, John 

(registered) 
Anderson, E. F. 

(registered) 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, Andrew 
Brandt. II. 
Berke, C. 

. M. 
Brun, Mattias 
Bedford, A. 
Bradabery, Geo. 
Carlson, Oscar 
Foreman, Niels 
Hansen, Johan G. 

n, H. O. 
Hanson, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Hans 



Janson, John 
Johanesen. Alf. 
Johnson, Karl 
Johannesen, Jonas 
Johanson, Emil 
Jorgensen, Jack 
Kepper, Henry 
Kinnunnen, Ant. 
Olsen, Alf 
Petersen, Hans 
Roneld, P. 
Randmets, Mike 
Risenius, Sven 
Saro, W. R. 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Toren, Gustaf 
Tourela. Brick 
Vejvorda, Frank 
Wattel, P. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHER, FURNISHER A. HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and Flret 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium in 

Connection 
Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Alaska Fishermen's Letter List 

Andersen, Oscar McNeill, Daniel 

Anderson, Hilding 
A. L. N. 
r.akinen, John 

tth, Konrad 
Carlson, Gust 
de Blom, A. 
Ericson, Rob 
Erickson. John 

i, J. 
Hansen. Emanuel 
Hansen, Anton 
Hakanson. Ingvar 
Isakson, Eriek 
Jacohsen, Jack 
Johansen, F. C. 



Ross 
Moxnes, Chris. 
Mlkelsen, P. 
Newton, A. B. 
Olofson, Charles 
Osterman, John 
Olsen, Thom 
Olsen, John 
Ome, Tobias 
Olsen, George 
Peterson, Frank 
Rasmussen. Peter 
Skovba, Nils 
Shivers, Witt. 
Svenson, August 



Johansen. Karl W. Schultz, Walter 
Johnson, John Tennison, Peter 

Karlson. George Wamsa, August 



KJerdalen, Ole 



Peter 



Kristoftersen, H. O. Registered Letters 



Cranzzl. Rosolino 
Meyer. Hans 



Leskinen. Fred 

Levele, Ed. 

Llndeberg. Ernest Mlttenmeyer, J 

Lauren, William Rasmussen, P. 

Lund, Frank 



Smith, R. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of John B. Isaacs will please notify 
Chas. F. Bullock, Marine Cooks' and 

Stewards' Association, 321 Twentieth 
street, Galveston, Texas. Matter of 
great importance. 3-31-20 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Porter" are requested to call at the 
Secretary's office for their vouchers 
for salvage services rendered to 
S. S. "Washington" on or about 
November 5, 1919. The vouchers are 
issued to the following members, 
and the respective amounts due 
thereon is as follows: 

Amudscn, R $22.50 

Eugene, John 22.50 

Makinen, K 22.50 

Mattson, Geo. J 22.50 

Rehnstrom, A 26.25 

Sjoholm, J. W 22.50 

Any one knowing the nearest rela- 
tives of C. C. Stewart, a late member 
of the Marine Firemen's Union of 
the Atlantic, are kindly requested to 
communicate with the Secretary of 
the above organization at 70 South 
St., New York, N. Y. 3-3-20 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1890 

MEN'S CLOTHING, SHOES, HATI 

and FURNISHING GOODS 

108-110 Main Street Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pols. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Seamen's Outfitters 
C. P. Salmi & Co. 

Men's Furnishings 

Shoes, Hats and Oiled Clothing 

411 EAST HERON STREET 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES, OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 
Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts.. Aberdeen, Wssh. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Rudolf Knutsson is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of h.s 
brother. J. Harvid Knutsson, a na- 
tive of Trellerborg, Sweden, aee 
20, last heard from in New York, 
in April, 1918. Please address bi= 
brother, rare Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific. 59 CInv street. San Fran- 
cisco, Calif 1-7-20 



An 8-room cottage with beautiful 
ne view overlooking the bay; 
ir a seafaring man 
at sacrifice, See owner, Kruhming, 

736 Kansas street, San l-'ran 



Phone 263 



"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Clpars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of Karl Reese, age 30, last heard of 
in [quique, Chile, October, 1916, bark 
Herbert," will please notify George 
Zimera, Sailors' Union, P. O. Box 
65, Seattle, Wash. 1-21-20 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Domlngue2, Joseph 
Gronlund, Oscar 
Johnson, . John 
Kuhlmann. Emll 
Mattson, Walter 
Melgrail. Mikel 
Person, Fritz, 

I/eonard 
Ralnhard. H 



Reilly, Ralph 
Rydellus, Rolp 
Shumko, Nick 
Smith. John 
Smith, Carl. Johan 
Svanson. Harold 
Swanson. H. -1216 
Thaysen. Arthur 
Thompson, T. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Ahren, Wm. 
Andersen, A. C. 
Andersson, Axel 
Andersson, Carl 
Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson, J. A. 
Anderson, Ed. 
Anderson, Gunnar 
Andersson, Bill 
Anderson, Herman 
Anderson. Carl E. 
Austin. Ed. 
Amundsen, Ben 
Alakaihn, Moses 
Allen, I. J. 
Alsic, Karl 
Bach, Soren 
Backman, Peter 
Bieler, Ben 
Blake, Frank 
Bohm, Gust 
Bohm, Franz 
Carmelie, Guiseppe 
Custer, Kenneth R. 
Danllson. Albln 
Darlington, Wm. 
Davison, Jim 
Diez. H 

Dooly, Frank E. 
Douglas, Joseph 
Durett, J. E. 
Erlckson, J. 
Erickson, Hans E. 
Ellegard, M. 
Engler, S. H. 
Enberg, Einar 
Fogelberry, Harry 
Forsberg, Swen S. 
Fugman, Arthur 
Gilkison, A. F. 
Golden, Roy L. 
Graff, John D. 
Gronbeck, H. 
Gruber, J. 
Halley, W. 
Hanson, August 
Hanson. Oskar W. 
Hardle, Wallace 
Hogstrom. Karl I. 
Hoiland, E. A. 
Helno, Gust 
Henrlkson, Geo. 
Huber, Charles S. 
Hurley, Michael 
Irmey, Feodor 
Jacobs, Fulton 
Jernberg, Alfred 
Jespersen, Martin 
Johnson, Emil 
Johanson, S. 
Johnson. Louis 
Jones, E. L. 
Kalfholm, Edw. 
Kauko, Axel 
Kelly, Norman 
Kennedy, B. L. 
Kjellberg, A. C. 
Klaver, R. 
Krause, Frank 
Kristiansen, Wm. A, 



Laine, A A. 
Laine, John 
Larsen, Hans 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Larson, C. J. -1632 
Lelslg. John 
Lindner, John P. 
Lovell, G. 
Lundgren. Gust 
Malech, Frank E. 
Malkoff, Peter 
Matson, R. M. 
McCroskey, Ray A. 
McGregor. Thos. 
McLeod, Angus 
McLean, M. R. 
MIkkelsen. Harry 
Moyer, Geo. E. 
Neilsen, H. J. 
Nelson, Nels 
Nelsson, C. 
Neullng. G. A. 
Nilsen, Christ 
Norberg, John E. 
Olsen, Michael 
Olson, T. 
Olson, John 
Pederson, Geo. 
Peterson, Mauiitz 
Petersen. Knut 
Pehte. Frank L. 
Preston. R 
Pyne, J. W. 
Raanes, Johan 
Rader. Allen 
Rautio, Jack 
Reiman, Tovo H. 
Rier, Earl W. 
Robertson, E. J. 
Robles. Frank 
Ross. Geo. 
Salne, Arthur A. 
Salonen. Victor 
Salln, Toivo H. 
Sandvik. S. G. 
Scott. M 
Shalin, Nils 
Sibley, M. 
Sinclair, P. 
Smith, Carl .7. 
Slade, I. S. 
Spencer. Torn 
Stout, R. E. 
Sutse. Michel 
Svansson. Ernest 
Taylor, Bert 
Thomson, Henry 
Thorsen, Chas. 
Tinstrom, A. R. 
Tuhkanen, John J. 
Walmough, P. 
Walter, E. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Wikstrom, Carl 
Willis, Samuel 
Wood. E. E. 
Wolf, Herbert 
Walters, Fred L. 
Worn, Otje 



San Pedro Letter List 



Aho, Jack 
Andersen, J. -2157 
Anderson. C. 
Andersen, C. 
Anderson, Sven 
Arentsen, John 
Arnesen. Isak 
Aspe, Theodor 
Belmont, Joe 
Bentley. Clifford 
Bengtsson, Sigfried 
Bergeson, B. 
Berglund, Emil J. 
Bergstrom. J 
Brast, Sjomans 
Braden, W. A. 
Beschorner, Robert 
Brown. Irving W. 
Bye, Kristian 
Burge, Larence 
Cage, Tom 
Carlsson, Chas. 
Cariera. P»ter 
Carr, R. W. 
Craig, Thomas 
Cowan, Wm. L. 
Church, C. E. 
Davis, OrvlllB 
Daw, Walter 
Deaver. Alvln 
Desmond,, Albin 
Doty, Erwin 
Daunt, C. 
Dreger, Jack 
Dragich, Peter 
Drennan, V\ . N. 
Ellasen, John 
Ek. William 
England. Thomaa 
Evans. Wilbert 
Evensen, Alex 
Farrell. H. D. 
Feeder, Geo. 
Ki'-kle Om-r 
Fottinger, Karl A. 
Kolvlk. Nudvtg 
Fordo. \ If rod 
Frair. Enoch 
Freiberg, P. 
Franzell. A. H. 
Kit- 1 lag, F. 
Gayton, H. L. 
<;rasson. Joe 
Gronthal. Arthur 
Golden, Roy 
Uuiiiieruu, I'lrlk 
Hansen. O'^f 
Hellsten, G. 



Hermanson, Carl 
Holland, Jonnie 
Hermanson, Carl 
Hey. Ben. 
Hickev, John 
Hogstedt, Chas. 
Houston, Robert 
Hurley, Michael 
Jacobsen, Jack -2445 
Jacobsen, Tom 
Janofy, Axel 
Jensen, Marius 
Jensen, Kristtan 
.Teeden, George 
Johnson, Carl E. 
Johansen, Anton 
Johansen, Johan W. 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen, J. -1432 
Johnson. G<>org» 
Johansen, J. -2314 
Johnson, P. -2313 
Johnson, Waldron 
Jonassen. Johannes 
Keel, Jewell 
Kelty. Peter 
Kenrich, Richard 
Ketelsen, Freuk. 
Keegan, J . 
Klieman, Otto 
Klementsen, Alf 
Kootz, Fred 
Knudsen Andrew 
Kruse. Henry 
Kristoffersen, Hans 
Laine John 
Landborg. Chas. 
Larsen. Johan -1542 
Lauritzen, Ole 
Levine. Carl 
Llndholm. Chas. 
Lill. Karl 
Lind, Gustav 
Llndstrom, John 
Llndeberg. Ernest 
Lowrey, John R. 
Lodersen. John 
Lorgeman. Fred 
Lobeles, Jose 
Lund. F. V. -2010 
Lucander, Hjalmar 
Maahs. Willy 
Magnussen, John 
Martinson J.-2b47 
Mato. Alexander 
McNeill. John 
McGhee, E. J 
McRae, Jack 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSTON ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 

SUITS AND A11 , A 

/ _ T . T ^_,_ , , All work done in 

OVERCOATS Established 

to Order at Popular for 20 years our own samtar y 

Prices workshop 

Represented by £ P£GUILLAN 



Books for You 
While at Sea 

ADVENTURE — SEAMANSHIP 
ROMANCE— HISTORY— TRAVEL 
SCIENCE— GREAT MEN'S LIVES 

Books to Help You Spend Idle Hours in a 
Pleasant and Worth While Way 

For a Free Crew's Library 
Exchangeable at Any Time 

Apply to 

American Library Association 



34 Sacramento Street 



San Francisco 



Phone Sutter 6985 

Or to other A. L. A. Agencies in Almost Any American Port 

These books are provided free for your use by the people 
of the United States through the American Library Association. 

When you have finished with them, they may be exchanged 
for another collection at any office of the American Library 
Association, or they may be exchanged for any A. L. A. collection 
on board another boat. 

In fairness to the men on the next ship receiving this collection 
you should take reasonable care to prevent loss or damage to 
any book. 



Home News 



Mize, J. H. 
Mehrtens, Carl 
Moor, Peter 
Monson, Edvin 
Moritz, W. 
Murphy, Francis J. 
Nauta. H. 
Nankinen. Fred 
Nelson, Ernest 
Nelson, Charlie 
Xelson. ChiS 
Nilsson, Edward 
Ogren, Victor E. 
Olofsen, O. A. 
Olsen, Ole 
Olsen. Harold 
Olsson. Otto 
Pett, Dick 
I'eiersen, Hugo 
Peterson, August 
Ranum, Harry 
Ra«rrms«.rri Swend 
Roberts, Bob 
Roberts, •(. W. 
Robertson, K. 
Robinson, Fred C. 
Rod. Ha.lfdan 
Rossdam, Harry 
Rnaontnal " 
Rohman, Pete 
Runge, R. 
Rueter. Amandus 
Sah'beig. Rudolf 
Sanders, Chas. 
Sandberg. N. A. 
Saxby, Charles 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Salln, Henry 
Schladen. H. 
Scaharry, Jacob 
Schaumberg, W. 
Soottol, Andrew 



Scrivers, W. 
Seland. Hans 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Soder, Paul 
Strehle. F. 
Strauss. Walter 
Steen, Ivar 
Stensland Paul 
Strom, Oscar 
Stenberg, Alfred 
Stemdock, John 
Steffensen, Hans 
Sundqulst, Walter 
Sunde, O. 
Sullivan, Jack 
Swindells, William 
Swanson, Mr. 
Swanson, Eric K. 
Thomsen, Thomas 
Treiberg, Peter 
Veckenstedt, W. 
Viscarra, Oscar 
Vn lb. Cus 

Wciinf-rnulst. <ntnn 
Wllhelmson, Karl 
Winkelman, Otto 
Wilprm. John 

Woods-. Claude F. 

Wrobluv«kl. Ran I 
Zimmerman. Frit* 
Z:lrirJe-»r. Tlipn 

Packages 
Hansen, Oscar W. 
Nail in on, Fred 
Roberson, Ole 
Erlckson, B. f:. 
Nanhlnen, Fred. 
Paters, ,T ]\i 

Plnnington, H. D. 

, Wiliiap- 
i, Walter 



INFORMATION WANTED 



The Centrale Bond von Trans- 
portarbeiders have placed in my 
hands claim of the father and 
mother of L. Verhoef, seaman who 
met his death on the S. S. "Balosaro" 
April 29, 1920. An old spring line 
broke, curled around Verhoef's left 
leg and yanked him on to the winch 
while he was operating it. Before 
it could be stopped his leg was taken 
off. He died two hours later at the 
hospital. Will members of the crew 
• report here promptly. The 
master has made an entry in the log 
hook to the effect that the deceased 
met with his death through intoxi- 
cation, which statement vvc believe 
to he utterly false. I am acting for 
the dependent relati e 1 1 is the 

| duty of seamen to tell the truth 
Your dependents may be in the same 
position some day. — S. B. Axtell. 

8-25-20 



An approximate cut of 20 per cent 
in wool cloth prices by the American 
Woolen Company was note'! at the 
company's opening of its fall exhibit, 
rding to the Textile World Jour- 
nal. The cut, said to be less than 
anticipated by the trade, was attribu- 
ted to little demand for woolen 

' ii tober 20 has been fixed officially 
as the date for the provisional refer- 
endum on the question of the best 
method of dealing with the liquor 
qui lion in British Columbia. Voters 
will be called upon to decide whether 
the present prohibition act shall be 
continued in force, or provision made 
for government control and sale in 
sealed packages of spirituous or malt 
liquor. 

So rapid has been the progress of 
the rice industry in California that 
lids product now forms one of the 
chief exports to foreign lands. They 
are even shipping rice — Japanese rice 
— to Japan. During the first quarter 
of 1920 more than 100,000 pounds of 
were exported from San Fran- 
cisco to Japan. Importations from 
other ports brought the total up to 
300,0011 pounds 

\s a result of the overwhelming 
i ictory of the Republican party in 
the Maine State election, the odds 
in favoi of Senator Harding to win 
the Presidential election next No- 
vember shol up to 3 to 1 in the 
Wall street district. W. L. Darnell 
& Co., 44 Broad street, who are 
handling election bets on a commis- 
sion basis, bet $9000 against $3000 
on Harding. Followers of Demo- 
cratic Candidate Cox are demanding 
odds of 4 to 1 against their favorite. 

The farmer-labor non-partisan 
movement in Kansas succeeded in 
defeating for renomination 11 State 
Senators at the recent primary. 
These Senators favored the Allen 
"can't-strike" law. As they are now 
retired to private life they will have 

■ e time to study the fundamental 

theory of American liberty and de- 
mocracy. The non-partisans declare 
that the primary elections cleared 
the decks and that they will surely 
defeat Governor Allen next N T o- 
vi mber. 

Carrying a crew of four men and 
a 1600-pound torpedo, a Martin 
bombing plane fitted with torpedo 
gear Hew from Washington to 
Yorktown, Pa., a distance of 125 
miles, in 64 minutes. Naval officers 
declared they believed the flight es- 
tablished a record for planes of that 
type. The flight was made as a test 
of the Martin plane in connection 
with its use with the bombing and 
torpedo practice soon to be con- 
ducted with the old battleship In- 
diana as a target. 

The U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture is experimenting with wheat, 
oal and rye straw to secure a new 
combustible for use for automobiles 
and cooking, but work on this com- 
mercial possibility is hampered by 
lack of funds. The department 
states that it has been possible to 
ite an automobile with straw 
gas and that 50 pounds of straw- 
will produce about 300 cubic feel oi 

I .in amount sufficient to drive a 
lighl roadster 15 miles. By-products 
from the straw, it is stated, ma) 
prove useful in the dye industry. 
These scientists are struggling to 

i t this dis< overj w ith a mi 
appropriation thai I longress grudg 
ingly doles out to the agricultun 
di partment 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



« ♦ 


Domestic and Naval 


* * 



The Standard Transportation Co. 
• Standard Oil of New York) is re- 
ported to have placed an order with 
the New York Shipbuilding Company 
for an oil tanker of 12,000 tons 
deadweight, in addition to the 
three already ordered of the same 
builders. 

The total receipts from tonnage 
duties for the year ended June 30, 
1920, according to returns to the 
U. S. Bureau of Navigation, Depart- 
ment of Commerce, was $1,707,934, 
compared with $1,265,229 for the 
fiscal year 1919. This year's receipts 
arc the largest on record. 

The records of the New York 
office of the Shipping Board disclose 
that, while in 1917 only 10 per cent, 
of the men below the grade of 
officers placed on Shipping Board 
vessels were native-born Americans, 
during the last six months the aver- 
age has been 55.7 per cent. 

The McDougall-Duluth Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Duluth, Minn., is 
building two 3,650-ton molasses 
tankers for the Sugar Products Com- 
pany of New York, one molasses 
tanker for the David Berg Industrial 
Alcohol Company, of Philadelphia, 
and two cargo boats for the Robert 
Barnes Steamship Company. 

Keels for two great battle criusers 
will soon be laid at the Philadelphia 
Navy Yard. The vessels are to be 
larger and faster, and carry far 
more deadly armament than any 
cruiser now afloat, according to 
naval officers. They will be 874 feet 
long, 106 feet wide, will draw 31 
feet of water, and have a displace- 
ment of 45,500 tons each. They 
will have oil-burning engines, and a 
speed of more than 33 knots. Each 
ship will have four armored turrets 
in which eight sixteen-inch 50-caliber 
guns will be mounted, secondary 
batteries of sixteen six-inch 53 caliber 
guns, four three-inch anti-aircraft 
mms, and eight twenty-one-inch tor- 
pedo tubes. 

Customs receipts at New York dur- 
ing the fisccl year ended June 30, 
1920, amounted to $230,083,885, as 
compared with $117,854,252 for the 
preceding year. The expense of col- 
lection amounted to $5,158,156, as 
compared with $5,116,119 last year. 
This increase is accounted for in 
the increased bonus to employes, 
which exceeded the bonus paid last 
year by $318,836. The cost of col- 
lecting a dollar, however, was the 
lowest for a number of years, being 
.0225, or 2% cents, compared with 
.0434, or a litttle better than 4% 
cents for the same period last year. 
The total value of imports was 
$2,904,946,043 and of exports $3,386,- 
984,723. 

According to the Panama Canal 
Record repairs to the forward hull 
of the steamship "Koyo Maru," which 
was grounded on the reef at Serrana 
Bank, are under way at the 1000-foot 
dry dock. Inspection shows that 
shell frames for approximately 80 
feet from bow on each side are 
badly damaged; most of the frames 
require splicing, being too badly 
bent and twisted to allow straighten- 
ing; about 75 per cent. t>f the shell 
plates for five strakes will require 
renewal, the balance being in such 
a condition that they can be reused. 
As cargo in No. 1 hold could not 
be worked due to this hold being 
flooded, it is being removed while 
the ship is in dry dock; due to this 
fact the entire damage can not be 
seen at this time; it seems probable 
that the tank tops will require re- 
pairs. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH .Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 

Deposits 63,352,269.17 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds _ 2,488,107.78 

Employees' Pension Fund 330,951 .36 

OFFICERS 
JOHN A. BUCK, President 
GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 
E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 
A. H. MULDER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
"WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMED, Assistant Cashier 
G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. DAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch 
W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 
O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

E. A. CHR1STENSON L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys 



San Francisco Letter List 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manger, The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Aagaard, A. M. Eckleberry, H. 
Adolfsson, John Eide, B. 

Almon, L Eide, W. 

Altonen, Carl Kisenhaidt. K. 

Andersen, O. -2099 Ellingsen, Harold 
Andersen, Chas. Ellis, F. L. 

Kngstrom, Ed. 

Endemann, M. 

Ennus, Plto 

Erickson. -997 



Theo. 
Andersen, N. F. 
Andreasen, H. 

1477 
Anderson, A. G. 

-2440 
Andersson, Edvin 
Anderson, Frank 
Andersson, C. -2001 
Andersson, G. A. 
Andersson, G. S. 
Anderson, John 
Andersson, C. B. 
-797 
Arzziro, Geo. N. 
Aso, Gustav 



Ernst, E. 

Fagerberg, Ivan 
Farevoog, C. M. 
Farrell, Bernand 
Fletcher, Jos. 
Freese, Paul 
Fredricksen, O. 
Freierbach. C. 
Fuller, Geo. E. 



Gallery, R. B. 

;hp£v""ciarence Gaynor ' Ambrose 
ce Geletneky. Hans 
Germenis, Socrates 
Graham, Claude 



Augustln, H. 
Aylward, Ja 



Baggs, H, I*. 
Baggs, Morris 
Bandel, Curt 
Bang, Hugo 
Baptiste, Lawr. 
Baris, N. 
Barlow, R. 
Bendixen, Hans 
Bergman, J. L. 



Graham, Ray 
Grainge, Arnold 
Granberg, Fred 
Gregory, M. N. 
Green, Lawrence 
Griffin, J. R. 
Gunderson, H. T. 
Uuunanu, Paul I*. 
M. -lilt 



ceigsL.om, «• ~- Hagemeyer, Gi 
Beschorner, Robert Ha | en , Horace 
Bjorklund. E. . Haider, Henry 



us 



Blomgren, C. A. 
Blomgreen, A. 
Bloom, Pete 
Boerner, P. F. 
Bolstad. Hans 
Bond, H. J. 
Borgeson, Hildlng 
Botsford, R. D. 
Boyland, O. J. 
Bourman. Jack 
Brauner, C. A. 
Broomhead, R. 
Broshear, A. O. 
Brown, H. W. 
Bryning, Wm. 
Bryning, Walter 
Buckner, Chas. 
Bye, Krist. 

Callahan, Patrick 
Carlsen, Sverre 
Carlson, John 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, G. -776 
Carlson, Peter 
Carlsson, J. 



Hale, Kingsley 
Halllt, Frank 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Hallowes, L. N. 
Haka, Ed. 
Hansen, -2010 
Hansen. -3190 
Haugen, H. C. 
Hammond. Robert 
Hangers, H. -1980 
Handley, Chas. 
Hansen, Hans M. 
Hansen, H. F. 
Hansen, Harold 
Hansen, S. P. 
_ Hanson, Olaf 
W.jiarbst, J. D. 
Harvey, Earl S. 
Hauptman, F. 
Hawkins, L. 
Hellsten. G. A. 
Hennlques. L. O. 
Hessin, B. 
Heaps, James 
Hereld, J. M. 
Heyen, Horace 

Carlsson, John -861 Heywood, D. L. 

Carpenter, Harold Iliggins, P. 

Cavanaugh, H. E. Hobbs, Frank A. 

Chilcott, Geo. Houlak. John 

Chavez, Mariano Hobbs, Frank M. 

Christensen, Jorgen Hoglander, Martin 
-1731 Holdaway, C. G. 

Christensen, Martin Hood, Alex 

Cherry, Arthur Huter, Chas. 

Chipps, Eric Huber, C. L. -2846 

Christensen. E . Hunter, Ernest 



Clausen, Louis 
Clug, Fredrick 
Cobb, Ralph H. 
Colman, J. 
Conley, Irwin 
Cooper, C. E. 
Coulyou, Joseph 
Culman, F. 

Dahl, Otto 
Dahl. Oskar 
Dahis, Ogden 



Ibsen, Christian 
Ireland, H. 
Isakson, Karl 

Jacklin, Charles 
Jacobsen, E. Th. 
Jacobsen, Herman 
Jahnke, Paul 
Jakullis, John 
Janson, John A. 
Jansson, HJ. 



Dahlgren, Wm. A. Jansson, John 



Davis. Warren 
Daunt, C. 
Delsing, Ernst 
DeMario, Thos 
Delaney, G. 
Derberg, M. 
Dickensen. T. 
Domminell, G. 
Domke. Willi 



Jens, Otto 
Jensen, Martin 
Jensen, E. -1987 
Jenson, Jens 
Jensen, Klaus 
Jernberg, Alf. 
Jeppsen, Chris. 
Jespersen, M. 
Jewell, Al. M. 



Donnelly, George F.Johannesen, Ole 

Drange, F. 8. 

Drennen, W. N. 

Dommelen, G. J. 

Duarte, John 

Duls, John 

Dumas, C. 

Dunwoody, G. 



Eaton, Lawrence 



Johanssen, Klaus 
Johansen, Eilert 
Johannesen, Johan- 
nes 
Johansen, Anton 
Johnsen, H. -2213 
Johnston, Edw. 
Johanson, E. -2715 
Johnson, A. Emll 



Johnson, Carl -2783 McCallum, Chas. 
Johnson, E. L. McClintlc, Frost 

Johansson, Bemad McCarthy, Harood 
Johnson, Walter McManus. Peter 
Joiner, Jack Maland, llelge 

Jonsson, J. H. -2951Mattos. M. D. 
Jorgensen, Johannes Markman, Hy. 
Jorgensen, F. Maynard, G. 

Josephson, Ben Mersman. A. 

Joyce, Daniel Mess, W. 

Judd, Jack Melgand, Rlcard 

Jungstrom, William Meyers, J. E. 

Mitchell, David 
Kaaveland, T. Mldgette, Frank W. 

Karlgren, -644 Mikelsen, Bern. 

Karlsson. E. -1738 Miller, R. K. 
Karlsson, Gustaf Moberg, Alf. 



Kasperson, E. 
Katkin, Ed. 
Kessell, Harry 
Keegan, Joe 
Kierne, G. H. 
Kihlman, Gunnar 
Klne, Conrad 
Kinnie, E. J. 
Kirby, Geo. 
Klemmetsen, Alf. 
lvluge, Fred 
Kluge, Martin 
Knudsen, Ragnval 
Knutsen. B. R. 
Kolustow, A. 
Kraal, J. 

Kristofferson, A. B. 
Kruse, Elnar 
Kuckens, B. 

LaMadrld. R. 

Lambert. Jos. 

Lange, Henry 

Langmann, Wm. 

Lanphear, D. 

Larsen. Alfred 

Larsen. H. -2280 

Larsen, Sigruid 

Larsen, John -2012Nicolaisen, Sam 

Laurence, Bruno Nickolsen, -1429 

Leeder. W. -2287 

Leegaard, Rasmus 

Letter, John A. 



Mooi. Peter 
Mohr. Karl 
Monroe, N. S. 
Monsen, Charlie 
Mol. J. W. 
Moller, Fritz 
Moonan, Thomas 
Morgan, R. a. 
Mortensen, Geo. 
Morltz. W. 
Morris, Francis 
Moore, H. L 
Morris, Jimmie 
Morrison, Donald 
Moulas, Nicholas 
Muller. Werner 

-N'areta, Th. 
Naville, Emll a. 
Naylor, Geo. i p . 
Nelson, Charles 
Nelson, Nils E. 
Nelson, C. R. 
Nesson, Ralph 
Ness, Aksel 
Neumann, II. -I 1_'3 
Neveau, Thomas 
Newton, A. 



Lehtonen, Hj. O. 
Lesklnen, F. A. 
Lidsten. Chas. 
Liesen, W. 
Lindeberg, Ernst 
Lindgren, A. A. 
Lind, H. -2314 



Nielsen, Johannes 
Nielsen, -1116 
Nilsson, -1176 
Nllsson, Reinhold 
Nitschke, Kail 
Nickerson, Phillip 
Nilsen, Martin L. 
Nilsson, Edward 
Nllsson, John 
Nolen, 



Lindquist, Chas. S. Nord, Clarence W. 
Lindroos, Fred Nordstom, Hans 

Liljedal, Ludv. Nordenberg, Alf. 

Loning, Herman Nordgren, Ragnar 
Lundquist, Ralph A.North, Jesse 1. 
Lubeck, Thos. Nuter, Alex 

Lundin. -1054 Nyman, John A. 

Lundstrom, Ernst 



Lydersen, Peder 

Maalo. Rasmus 
MacLeod, Norman 
Macauley, D. 
Makares, S. J. 
Mannonen, Niels 
Manzano, Luis 
Marker, Andrew 
Marshall, Ira 



Oad. John 
O'Brien, Larry 
Ogren, V. E. 
O'Leary, Patric 
olausen, Christian 
Olsen, Arnold 
Olsen, -1020 
Olsen, 

Olsen, Hans, Th. 
Olsen, Fred 



Martinsen, Ingvald Olsen, Magnus 
Mattos. Mario P. Olsen, Ole 



Mahaffey, Cecil 
Mattson, Hildlng 
Mattson, Victor 
McGauley, Geo. 
McGann. Oliver 
McGregor, Donald 
McGillvray, W. 
McKenzle, Alex. 
McLean, Grant 
McEvoy, Peter 



Olsen, Wm. J. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen, C. -1412 
Olsson, Charle 
Olson, Ed. 
Olsson, James 
Ostlund, John 
Osborne, E. T. 
Osborne, James 
Ozolin, Jan 



Page, J. N. Solberg. Bernt P. 

Parrish, Arthur L. Soneson, Wilhelm 



Paul. Ben 
Pearson, Edw. 
Pedersen, \v. -16SI 
Peterson, Albert 
Petersen, Fredrik 
Petterson, O. A. 
Peterson, Henry 



Sorensen, Jorgen H. 
Sovdsnes, O. Peter- 
sen 
Sonne, Herman 
Spence, O. L. 
Speckman, Max 
Spey, H. F. 



Peterson, O. -1595 Stanford, Harry 



Phillips, Boh 
Post, Albeit 
Potter, E. R. 
Price, Arthur 
Prusch, A. 
Puttner, Fred 

Ramasse, Joe 
Ramos, Enrique 
Randmetz, Mich. 
Rasmussen, Peter 



Stensland, Paul 
Sternisa, Carl 
Stout, R. E. 
Stragseth, Svend 
Strele. F. 
Strom. C. A. 
Strurh, O. 
Stang, A. 
Stenensen. A. 
Stewart. William 
Stone, Wlcktor 



Rasmusen, Rudolpf f*™? *\ft> : O. 
Rasmussen, Aksel ^ un ^ De A ^ X k . c . 



Rasmussen, Emll 
Rasmussen, Karl V, 
Raynor. Robert 
Regnill, Gustaf 
Reuter. R. A. 
Richardson, Edwin 
Riesbeck, Hj. 
Rillukka, John 
Roberts, John 

■ -'■II. Robert 
Rohman, Paul 
Rogers, Thos. G. 
Rollo, R. 
Rommel, Andrew 
Ronn, E. 
Rose, J. 
Ross, -ir.no 
Ross. H. E. 

Rosenberg, L. F. K.TurrTeVrw.' A. 
Roth, M 



Suominen, Oskar 
Swanson. C. 
Swinka, Albert 

Tacle, John 
Taylor, Sam C. 
Tellef8on. Emll 
Thomas, Fred 
Thompson, Peder 
Tillman, Chas. 
Tingstrom, A. R. 
Tohtz, R. C. 
Torson, Andrew 
Tovano, A. R. 
Touzel, R. 
Trebensen, Nick 
Tucker, Harold J. 
Tufty, C. J. 



Rubins, Ch. 
Rupert, Geo. 
Russell, Robert 

Saharoff, John 
Salli. Rudolf 
Sampson. C. L. 



Vargas, Martina 
Van der Loeff, 

H. A. 
v d Ort, \Y. 
Van Helden, H. 
Viets, C. L. 
Vierr. W. 



Sampson, Carl -2136 vitek Riiward 
Samuelson. E. -3888v,y£ a 
Sanne. Rudolf V ,J™{ > £ A 



Sanjer, Sajer 
■launders, Dewey A, 
Saxby, C. H. 
Scanlon, David P. 
Schmees, Herman 
Schmidt, E. H. 



Wahlstrom, K. 
Wallin, Gust 
Walters, Harry 
Ware, T. F. 

Waterfall, L. X. 



Schneldau. ' Heinrlch Waterman, J. K. 
Scluoeder. Ernst Wessberg, E. H. N. 



Schulze. John 
selvert, Albert 

id. Rasmus 
Sexton, Harry J. 
Sharman. E. S. 
Sidroff. Mck 
Sigrlst. George 
Simpson, Joseph H. 
Sinnes, K. E. 
Sjogren. Fred. 
Skaar, Oskar M. 
Skeries. Hans 
Slattery, Harry 
Small, E. R. 
Smedsvig, O. B. 
Smith. Jas. 
Smith. W. 
Smith, John H. 
Smith, Geo. B. 
Smith, A. G. 



West, Frank 
W heller, Geo. 
Whiting, Russell 
Wigsten, Geo. 
Wiken, Emll 
Wlera, Hy. 
Wiklund, Wiktor 
Wilhelm, Edu. 
Wlnther, Johan 
Wilks. J. 
Willmann, Wm. 
Wilkins, Hv. 
Wittenburg, D. 
Woods, Dick 
Wolfe. E. O. 
Wolff, Paul E. 
Yarkwelt, A. 
Von, F. C. 
Young, R. T. 
Zealberg, Jack 



PACKAGES. 



Allison. Ben 
Barlow, Robt. 
Blake, L. 
Booshard, H. 
Breeze, J. 
Churman, W. C. 
Cornell usen, M. 
Deu Pree, E. 
Eads, Joe 
Egan, John 
Engstrom, Edw. 
Frey, Peter 
Ganser, Joe 
Garrlck, J. B. 
Goodman, Tony 
Griffin, J. R. 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Henrikson, Ernst 
Hobbs, Frank A. 
Hoglander, M. 
Holmes, Geo. 
Jansonu, C. J. W. 
Johnson, John 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
Kalllo, F. 
Kalning, P. G. -1342 



Ketelsen, Fred 
LaMadrld, Rafael 
Larsen, J. -2012 
Larson, Axel 
Lehto, Oscar 
Liljedal, L 
Lindgren, E. 
Locke, J. E. 
Lundquist, Ralph 
Mathis, Hartley H. 
McPherson, R. 
Mortensen, Bjarne 
Navarrete, Joe 
Newman, L. 0. 
Nordlund, Albert 
Pattersen, Frank 
Pedersen, Anders 
Sorensen, Jos. E. 
Sternica, Carl 
Stranberg, P. 
Tlllsten, Jack 
Travers 

van Vleet, F. B. 
Wallin, V. O. 
Williams, J. D. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Charles Bernard Wilson, born in 
Stevenson, Alabama, write or come 
to your mother, Flora M. Wilson, 
719 18th street, Oakland Cal., care 
.Mrs. J. Buck. 9-22-20 




FRANK M. NESTROY 

Phone Kearny 6361 THE ARGONAUT TAILORS UNION TAILOR 

We do Master Tailoring on Suits, Overcoats and Uni- 
forms for men who desire to dress and look superior. 
We carry the largest selection of Imported and do- 
mestic woolens. Quality and workmanship guaranteed. 
MARKET 8T. 8AN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 

268 MARKET STREET 

Conducted by Capt. Chas. Ehlers 

Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since Its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

300 Rooms at 50 cents per day, 
$2.50 to $3.00 per week, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL, L.UNDGREN. Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



— Phones — 

Office, Fkln 7756 Residence, Rand 27 

Office Hours, 9:30 a. m. to 6 p. m. and 

7 to 8 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9:30 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

Liberty Bonds accepted In exchange for 

dental work 

2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Golden Gate 

and Taylor Streets, San Francisco 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 
Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



19 East Street, Foot of Ferry Bridge 

Wholesale— OUTFITTER— Retail 

Everything for the man that goes to sea 

SEAMEN AND FISHERMEN 

GEO. A. PRICE 



u. s. 

Sea Boots 



IS RIGHT 

Navy 
Flannels 



Tower's 
Oil Skins 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer"s Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall 


Bros. 


Express 


Stand and Baggag 


e Room 




— at — 




212 EAST ST., San 


Francisco 


Ph( 


>ne Douglas 


5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for Instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

7M MARKET STREET, N«ar Fourth 
•AN FRANCI8CO 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5 

UNIFORMS & SUITS, TO ORDER & READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 

36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



SAVE MONEY ON YOUR SHOES 

Would you walk one-half block from Market Street to 

Save $1 to $3? 

We are located at 58 Third 
St., San Francisco. 

We are agents for — 

W . L. Douglas 
Just Wright 
Walk Ease 
Strong & Garfield 

We can positively save 
you money by buying 
your SHOES from us. 

Our low rent and small 
expense make it possible 
for us to sell cheaper 
than the Market Street 
stores paying six times 
our rent. 

We are showing a most exclusive and large stock of men's 
shoes. We can fit any foot and suit any fancy. 




PRICES 



58 THIRD STREET 

Between Market and Mission 
San Francisco, Cal. 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 1804) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. T. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date In every respect. For 

full Information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




JACOB PETERSEN * SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCI1CO 



C 1V/I Alf F U Q See that this label (in light blue ^ a PP ears on the 
O 1V1 \J IV Hi K. 3 box in which you are served, 

Issued by Authorityoi the Cigar Makefs' International Union of America. 

Union-made Cigars. 



T^aUha Cioat» contained Inlhit box hm 



n .~.HAmm'IHILRNA'tlO)Ul UMIOMC AMnti. inoruni 

Hit M0RA1 jMAUrllAl and nilUlttliui WlllAM Of THt OWl lawsfo/HM to 



t»o m«i. ky • fisi-CUss Woius« 

a. an ofMnuatw devotee to th«»d. 



. «Mm Ciojis to all 3/noMr> Uirouflhoyl tha w«U 
<{<Saf JlMiopaajaUiirM Uv. 'at* 1 "lit be pumsKtd eaoadino, to Itm, 



V cifiu*, 



tfAltWKt 



ITAMf 



News from Abroad 



A port is to be constructed at 
Comodoro Rivadavia (Argentina) at 
an estimated cost of $1,500,000. 

Reports from Mesopotamia indi- 
cate a spread of anarchistic rebel- 
lion against the British in that 
country, says a London War Office 
report. 

A Spanish Royal Decree subjects 
foreign emigrant ships sailing from 
Spanish ports to a progressive tax 
which starts at 10,000 pesetas for 
2,000 emigrants. 

A contract for the construction of 
an oil pipeline between Havre and 
Paris, with a daily capacity of 50,000 
barrels, has been awarded to Messrs. 
James Stewart & Co., of New York. 

The Navy crew representing the 
United States in the Olympic regatta 
in Brussels won the world's title 
and set a new world's record of six 
minutes and five seconds. 

According to the Japanese Ship- 
ping Controller, last year the tonnage 
of merchant vessels built in Japan 
amounted to about 700,000, this being 
about 10 times the pre-war output. 

At a recent meeting of 527 West 
Australian farmers, it was unani- 
mously decided to subscribe £250,- 
000 towards the £1,000,000 required 
for the establishment of wheat ele- 
vators. 

In order to provide a sufficient 
supply of beef for local consumption, 
the Government of Jamaica has 
agreed to relax regulations which 
prohibit the importation of cattle for 
slaughtering purposes. 

Munitions and hydroairplanes val- 
ued at nearly $2,000,000, recently con- 
fiscated by the Entente Commission 
in Germany, were destroyed by Ger- 
man workmen, many of whom are 
Communists, says a London dispatch. 

A report from Mexico City says 
that Augustine Preve, who recently 
declared war on the whole world, 
except Russia, has been captured at 
Campeche and is being held for trial 
on charges of rebellion. 

The Mexican Embassy at Wash- 
ington issues an official statement 
promising equitable settlement of all 
claims against the Mexican Govern- 
ment and assurances that in the 
future protection will be afforded all 
foreigners who enter Mexico. 

The Government of India is still 
retaining control of the rice trade. 
It is anticipated, however, that if the 
present crop turns out favorably, 
control will be abandoned before the 
end of the year and exports will 
once more be free. 

Grain shipments from Argentina 
during the first six months of this 
year, compared with the same period 
of 1919, were as follows: Wheat, 
4,198,685 tons (838,165); maize, 1,- 
917,710 tons (856,820); linseed, 582,- 
868 tons (222,420); oats, 210,104 tons 
(109,335). 

The Danish mercantile fleet com- 
prised, at the end of 1919, 708 ves- 
sels of more than 100 tons, totaling 
749,020 tons, which, as compared 
with the respective figures for 1914, 
means a decrease by 10.9 per cent, 
in the number, and by 4.6 per cent. 
in the total tonnage. 
. Under a new six months' coal 
agreement signed by representatives 
of the Swiss and German Govern- 
ments, Switzerland will receive from 
15,000 to 20,000 tons of coal and 
coke and 15,000 tons of briquets per 
month. The agreement will run until 
January 15, 1921. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



♦ 


i, 


With 


the Wits 


« 


* 



Making It Easy.— To facilitate the 
scheme for taking the finger prints 
of infants in America, it is proposed 
to make the impressions in jam. 
The Passing Show (London). 



Reason Enough. - Binks (coming 
out of theatre)— "Why did every- 
body cry during the death scene? 
They must have known that the 
actor was not dead." Jinks— "Yes, 
that was just it." — Michigan 
goyle. 



The Real Difficulty.— Best Man— 

"What's the matter! Have you lost 
the ring?" Bridegroom — "The ring 
is all right, old man, but I've lost my 
beastly enthusiasm."— -London Opin- 
ion. 



A Practicing Physician. Patient — 
"I want to see doctor. Be this the 
place?" Doctor — "This is where I 
practice." Patient— "Don't want no 
person for to practice on me, I want 
a doctor for to cure me 
letin (Sydney). 



-The liul 



Looking Forward. — They had just 
become engaged. "I shall love," she 
cooed, "to share all your griefs and 
troubles." "But, darling," he pur- 
red, "I have none." "No," she 
agreed; "but 1 mean when we are 
married." — Dallas News. 



Conclusive Evidence. — William and 
Henry, chauffeurs, were discussing 
the ill-luck of a fellow chauffeur, 
Clarence, who had the day before 
been fined for taking out his em- 
ployer's car without permission. "But 
how did the hoss know Clarence had 
taken the car out?" asked Henry. 
"Why," explained William, "Clar- 
ence ran over him." — Harper's Maga- 
zine. 



Open Season. — A tourist was just 
emerging from a corn-field by the 
roadside, bearing in his arms a dozen 
handsome roasting ears, says the 
I (akley Graphic. A second car ap- 
proached and stopped, whereupon the 
tourist readied for his pocketbook 
and asked in an embarrassed manner, 
"How much*''" "One dollar," said 
the newcomer, and then, after re- 
ceiving payment, remarked, "This is 
a fine field of corn. Wonder who it 
belongs to?" — Kansas City Star. 



I CAN SAVE YOU 

$15 

ON YOUR SUIT 



My place is located on a 
side street, hence my 
expenses are practically 
nothing compared to big 
houses on main thorough- 
fares. 



TOM WILLIAMS 

THE UNION TAILOR 

28 SACRAMENTO ST. 



You get the same class 
of Service, Woolen trim- 
mings and excellent 
Workmanship. The Style, 
Quality and Fit I guar- 
antee. 

Is the amount not worth saving 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
Of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Ilcnry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 
500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 
Hezzanith's, Lord Kelvin's, VVhyte, Thomson's 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus, 
Dividers, Nautical Books, Charts and Tide Tables. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 

1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 
We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cath 



Diamonds 



Phons Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 





^amesJt Sorensc/% 



The One Price Jewelry Store. Everything Marked In 
Plain Figures 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

Attractive Platinum or Gold Mountings with 

Exquisite Diamonds 

WEDDING RINGS 

Hand Carved in Platinum, White Gold, Green 

Gold and the Old Style Plain Gold in 12 

DIFFERENT STYLES and all sizes 

WEDDING GIFTS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

715 MARKET ST., Above Third SAN FRANCISCO 

JEWELERS. WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

Store Open: 8:30 A. M. to 6:00 P. M., Saturday Included 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Franclscc 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want your Panama blocked 
right I'll do that. 

You'll And me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BE8T SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

133 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 1660 



CJKMEU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S 






SngEiS5M?SSg5SS>;.n '-wV,W>v ,^gri^^ 





FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 






A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXXIV, No. 5. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1920. 




Whole No. 1721 



COMPENSATION LAWS FOR SEAMEN 

The Urgent Need for Federal Legislation 



For several years the best lawyers in 
America have been unable to clearly de- 
fine a seaman's right under the law to 
compensation or damages for accidental 
injuries aboard ship. 

There are so many conflicting court 
decisions on existing laws that ordinary 
folks are hopelessly lost in the maze of 
verbiage necessary to explain the many 
intricate points involved. Of course, there 
is only one way out of the maze and that 
is the enactment of a Federal Compen- 
sation law for seamen. 

Mr. Warren H. Pillsbury, compensation 
expert of the California Industrial Acci- 
dent Commission, has favored the Journal 
with the excellent treatise on the subject 
which is published herewith, in full, and 
is commended to the careful perusal of all 
who earn their livelihood aboard ship. 



The development of compensation legislation 
is still quite incomplete. The number of em- 
ployes in excluded occupations, who should be 
under compensation protection is unnecessarily 
large. In nearly all States, agricultural, casual 
and domestic employes are excluded. In some 
States employes in employments where less 
than four, five or sixteen workmen are en- 
gaged, are still excluded. Some States limit 
their coverage to employes in specified hazard- 
ous occupations, and by reason of conflicts of 
jurisdiction between the States and the Federal 
government, most railroad employes and prac- 
tically all maritime workers are taken out from 
the protection of State compensation laws, al- 
though receiving no compensation protection 
under Federal law. It is the purpose of this 
paper to discuss briefly the lot of the maritime 
worker. 

Maritime employment is one of the most 
hazardous of industrial occupations. A sailor 
has the perils of the sea to face in addition to 
the ordinary dangers incident to working about 
machinery or handling goods. The stevedore 
is in constant danger from swinging booms or 
swinging loads of commodities being hoisted 
into or out of ships, from falling articles of 
cargo, and from infection from scratches or 
lacerations received in the handling of dirty 
articles and in the stowage of freight in dirty 
holds. These conditions have not as yet been 
improved by any systematic safety work, either 
by the States or Federal government, although 
the latter has done something under the La 
Follette act to prevent loss by shipwreck. 
When the same system of safety inspection is 
applied to working quarters aboard ship as is 
now being given by the more advanced States 
for land industry, maritime work will be more 
attractive to native-born Americans. 



On the compensation side of maritime work, 
the situation is equally deplorable. State com- 
pensation laws are now finally precluded from 
compulsory application to maritime work by a 
series of decisions by the United States Su- 
preme Court, holding that the law maritime 
is paramount even though Congress itself may 
have legislated to the contrary. The law mari- 
time affords little or no .protection to injured 
seamen or their dependents. If the seaman 
be injured or killed by negligence of the vessel 
or its owners, a complicated action for damages 
is allowed in the admiralty courts which is in 
no respect more beneficial to the seaman than 
suits for damages in the State courts for other 
employments, long since superseded by com- 
pensation laws. If the injury be not due to 
negligence, the seaman is limited to medical 
care and maintenance for a short period under 
the rule of "The Osceola" which gives far less 
than compensation. For permanent injuries no 
system of rehabilitation is provided. For death 
cases, it is very seldom that the widows and 
children receive an allowance of any sort. The 
States cannot give relief, though the burden 
of the poverty caused by injured maritime 
workers falls upon the States instead of the 
Federal government. Congress cannot even 
authorize the States to protect themselves 
against this burden, or to protect their citizens 
against industrial losses. The United States 
has not acted to give such protection in its 
own right. 

While this may sound doleful, there is an- 
other phase of the matter which even more 
strongly savors of injustice. Congress has from 
time to time enacted legislation for the up- 
building of a merchant marine by the encourage- 
ment of the investment of money in shipping. 
Such legislation, at least until the recent war, 
did not succeed in its purpose, i. e., it did not 
develop an American merchant marine. The 
indirect effect of such legislation was, more- 
over, to penalize the maritime worker, and the 
net result was to give to the capitalist invest- 
ing in American shipping a preference at the 
expense of his employes instead of at the 
expense of the public at large. For instance, 
the Harter act and the Limited Liability act 
have the effect of freeing a ship owner from 
liability for practically all claims for loss of 
life or personal injuries to members of the 
crew, as well as claims for loss of cargo, where 
the ship is a total loss. Even where a seaman 
or his dependents have a good right of action, 
the employer can limit his liability, if the vessel 
be lost, so as to defeat this right. This is a 
privilege not accorded to any land industry 
and is directly opposed to the practice of com- 
pensation legislation in which claimants for 
compensation are given preference over general 
creditors. In the proposed Federal compensa- 
tion act for maritime workers, some provisions 
should be made whereby the right of limitation 
of liability by the employer should not be exer- 
cised so as to defeat compensation payments. 

The effect of the Limited Liability act may 
be illustrated further by pointing out that the 
ship owner and cargo owner can insure their 



losses so that if a vessel be lost at sea the 
insurance company will make good the loss to 
the owner, although he be relieved from direct 
liability by the operation of this act. The 
seaman cannot, however, insure his earning 
capacity, as his wages are too low, and acci- 
dent insurance premiums are too high, for his 
occupation to make any private system of acci- 
dent insurance practicable. If the vessel be 
lost at sea with all on board, the ship owner 
can keep the payments made to him by his 
insurance company with which to purchase 
a new vessel. He does not have to devote 
the proceeds of his insurance policy to the 
relief of the dependents of his employes. The 
dependents alone get nothing and are cast a 
burden upon the public and private charities 
of the State in which they reside. 

The injustice of the situation is further en- 
hanced by reference to the coastwise shipping 
act by which foreign vessels are prohibited 
from engaging in coastwise maritime commerce 
of the United States. The ostensible excuse 
for the Limited Liability act is that it makes 
it possible for American shipping to engage 
in competition with foreign shipping. No such 
protection is needed for our coastwise shipping, 
because there is no competition with foreign 
vessels in this traffic, which claims a large pro- 
portion of our maritime commerce. Neverthe- 
less limited liability may be invoked for losses 
in coastwise shipping. The result is that if a 
coastwise vessel be lost, the ship owner may 
limit his liability and invest his insurance 
money in a new vessel, suffering no substantial 
loss. The cargo owner collects his insurance 
upon his lost cargo. The dependents of many 
of the passengers can realize upon their life 
insurance policies, but the dependents of the 
lost crew get nothing. The only uncom- 
pensated loss is that sustained by the widows 
and orphans of the maritime workers. The 
protection of the Limited Liability act should 
not be given to ship owners in coastwise traffic 
to the prejudice of claims for damages or com- 
pensation for the loss of members of the 
crew. 

The insurance situation is unsatisfactory as 
well as the compensation and safety situation. 
In California, prior to the decision of the 
Knickerbocker Ice Comvany Case, last May, in 
which the United States Supreme Court finally 
excluded State workmen's compensation acts 
from protection to maritime workers, a number 
of the maritime companies operated temporarily 
under our compensation act. In litigation aris- 
ing under it, the insurance situation came 
prominently to the fore. In California we 
noted early, that most of the insurance covering- 
liability of the ship owner for injuries to his sea- 
men, either common law or compensation liabil- 
ity if ultimately sustained, was placed in certain 
English maritime insurance companies. A gen 
eral form of policy was used by a nunibei oi 
these English concerns, commonly known as 
the "P and 1," or Protection and Indemnity 
insurance. More recently an American club 
was formed to give the same insurance upon a 
mutual basis, but apparently, until recently, the 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



I, concerns have dominated t lie field. 
Their adjustment attitude, at least in Califor- 
nia, was unsatisfactory in the extreme. Along 
the Atlantic seaboard I have not heard of as 
much difficulty as we have had here, possibly 
due to a better adjustment attitude in the 
or to a less broad < of maritime workers 

in Atlantic Coast compensation States. In Cali- 
fornia t lie principal difficulties encountered were 
that the British concerns had no one within 
the State, or within the United States, upon 
whom service of process of the Conn; 
could he made, so that it was impossible to 
them parties to a compensation proceed- 
ing. 'The employer defended each c 
the Commission, hut was in fact represented 
. attorneys of the insurance concern, who 
frequently refused to permit the employer to 
take a liberal attitude under threat of forfeiture 
of the insurance. They resisted all large claims 
very technically, carrying test ease after test 
to the courts upon constitutional or 
technical grounds, and delayed most other cases 
until the test cases should be decided. In small 
cases settlements were sometimes prompt, but 
usually the claimants were underpaid, according 
to compensation Standards. Jurisdictional con- 
llict between the State compensation law ami 
the admiralty law was frequently made use of 
to throw the claimant from one court to the 
other and back again, in the endeavor to defeat 
liability on each theory in turn. So far as 
known, these English concerns are under no 
supervision in their own country as to solvency 
and management, such as that given by insur- 
missioners in the different States in 
the L'nitcd States. 

Further, the insurance policies issued by 

erns, while in fact covering the 

mou liability of the employer, invariably 

1 the statutory provisions required by 

the State compensation acts and declined to 

accept any of the responsibility which the State 

law requires of compensation insurance carriers. 

In short, the maritime insurance covering the 

compensation hazard among others, was in the 

ban. Is almost entirely of outsiders, who did 

tiake themselves subject to the laws or 

courts of the jurisdiction under which they 

operated, and adopted adjustment polici 

variance with the requirements of the jurisdic- 

ions in which they carried on their business. 

The writer cannot state much as to the adjust- 
ment attitude of the American P and I club, 
as he did not come into contact with it t 

extent prior to the decision in the 
Knickerbocker Ice Company case. 

A very satisfactory form of maritime policy, 
from the compensation point of view, was dis- 
covered by the writer in the policy of the As- 
sociated Companies, in which some ten com- 
panies engaging in the compensation business 
in the United States, issue a policy covering 
the liability of the employer and dividing the 
risk between them. On account of the catas- 
trophe hazard, no one compensation insurance 
carrier could afford to insure the crews of 
vessels, but the association of these ten com- 
panies upon each risk eliminates this difficulty. 
Such companies do business in the various 
States, are thoroughly responsible, subject them- 
selves to the jurisdiction of the different boards 
and commissi, ,ns of the States in which they 
operate and comply with the laws of those 
States. If the Knickerbocker Ice Company de- 
cision had been the other way. the writer would 
have endeavored to start a movement for in- 
sistence on such form of policy to the exclusion 
of the P and 1 policies. 

Attempts to Protect Maritime Workers. 

The Federal Government being dilatory, the 
first attempt to give better protection to em- 
ployes against maritime injuries came from the 
State-, Admiralty law, like the common law, 
never provided a right of action for wrongful 
death, so the States somewhat early in their 
history, provided negli statutes, giving 

such right of action. By act of Congress of 1789, 
the provision being known as the "saving 
clause" of the Judiciary act, claimants in ad- 
miralty had the alternative of suing upon 
contracts or injuries either in admirality or 
in the State courts according to the col 
law, which common law included State Sta 

d either before or after the act ol 
L^rcss. The admiralty courts thereafter adopted 
such State statutes so that in the event of a 
fatal injury to a sailor due to the negligence 
of the ship owner, the dependents could sue for 
damages either in the State court under the 
State law, or in the admiralty court according 
to the usual course m admiralty, but based upon 
the same State law. This situation went on 
for many years until workmen's compensation 
acts developed in the l'nitcd States. After the 
passage of the first compulsory compensation 
acts, the State authorities applied such com- 
pensation acts to maritime .injuries upon the 
same principle, i. e., that an injured employe 
or bis dependents had the option under this 
"saving clause" of suing in the admiralty court 
or of suing in the State court upon the State- 
law. When this matter came to a test in the 
United States Supreme Court it was held, how- 
ever, in the celebrated case of Southern Pacific 
Company vs. Jensen. 244 C. S, 205, reversing 
the previously ai cepted doctrine that the State 
compensation act could not he applied. This 
was a live to four decision, the majority opinion 



being written by Mr. Justice McReynohls and 
based UpOl ing unsatisfactory to all ad- 

miralty lawyers as well as compensation authori- 
se stand apparently taken by the court 
was that workmen's compensation acts, being 
new legislation and at variance with common 
law principles of liability, were not included 
within the act of Congress of 1789 above re- 
ferred to, and that therefore the jurisdiction 
oi the admiralty courts was exclusive. 

To remedy this situation, Congress, on 
>er 5. I'M 7, unanimously passed an amend- 
ment to the Federal judicial code expanding 
the "saving clause'' above referred to, to extend 
the concurrent jurisdiction of the State authori- 
ties to include relief for maritime injuries under 
State compensation acts. This act of Congress 
was in turn declared unconstitutional, also by a 
five to four decision, in Knickerbocker Tee 
Company \s Stewart, decided in May of this 
year. Mr. Justice McUeynolds again wrote the 
majority opinion and the same four judges con- 
curred with him as before. The decision holds 
virtually that Congress cannot permit State 
statutes, which are based upon principles un- 
known to the common law. to be applied to mari- 
time matters, upon the assumption that the 
l'nitcd States Constitution has made the law 
maritime of national scope and placed it be- 
yond the authority of the States. The decision 
is much to be deplored. The federal ConStitU- 
DOwhere, in express terms, contains such 
requirement, and the previous history of ad- 
miralty law largely involves recognition of State 
statutes where not contrary to acts of Congress. 
The parallel course of development in State 
and Federal jurisdiction in matters affecting 
interstate commerce also leads to the same 
Conclusion, as it has been held repatedly that 
State -created rights of action for damages for 
injuries to railroad employes are valid, even 
though dealing with injuries in interstate coni- 
. until such time as Congress took unto 
itself the regulation of this field. The result is 
that by a misunderstanding or lack of sympathy 
with compensation principles, the court has 
excluded the States from the protection of 
maritime injuries by workmen's compensation 
laws, while it still permits State damage 
laws to be applied to the same injuries. 

Assuming the ideal to which the majority of 
the Federal court are striving, i. e., a national 
system of maritime law untrammeled by State 
interference, the decision was nevertheless un 
ny. Complete Federal control of mari- 
time law is sufficiently secured by the ability 
of Congress to assume full authority at any time 
in its discretion. It was not necessary that the 
States be prevented from giving relief at a 
time when the Federal Government itself was 
doing nothing. If the decision had been the 
other way in the Knickerbocker Ice Company 
case and State compensation acts had been 
allowed to apply to maritime injuries, such 
acts would all have been obliged to give way 
upon the passage of a uniform Federal com- 
pensation act. It seems an undue refinement, 
therefore, to oust the States from the protection 
of maritime workers at a time when Congress 
has provided no protection. In the last analysis, 
the protection of maritime workers is a local 
problem, not a national one. The crippled 
wanker and his family are burdens upon the 
States, not upon the national Government, and 
unary purpose of compensation legislation 
is to protect the community and its citizen 
workers against poverty due to industrial in- 
jury. With this protection the Federal Govern* 
ment is not concerned. 

However, this may be, the decision of the 
United States Supreme Court upon the subject 
is for the present binding, and the States can 

do nothing i e officially. This leads us to a 

survey of the national situation. 

The first really important law which Con- 
gress has passed for the protection of seamen 
is the La Follette Act of 1915. This improved 
the condition of seamen materially along the 
line of better safety and living conditions and 
protection against abuse. It did not touch upon 
compensation for injuries. It met with ex- 
tremely vigorous opposition upon the part of 
shipowners and was only enacted after a very 
hitter tight, although every land employment 
had long since been put under greater obliga- 
tion for the comfort, health, safety and welfare 
ployes than the ha Follette Act imposed 
shipowners. Even shipowners in coastwise 
shipping opposed it. although immune from 
fi .reign competition. 

next measure was t! i October 

5, 1917, above mentioned, which the Supreme 
Court of the United States held unconstitutional 
in the Knickerbocker Ice Company case. Fol- 
lowing this. Congress, in March, 1920. passed 
an abortive measure, providing a right of action 
for wrongful death for all injuries occurring 
upon the high seas. This gives only a remedy 
by damage suit for negligence, of the same type 
as that superseded in the various States by com- 
tion legislation. It was unnecessary, as 
the Ji 1 Knickerbocker cases still per- 

mitted State statutes to be applied under such 
circumstances, and practically every State has 
such death statute. It was an anomaly, in that 
it limited application of such statute to injuries 
occurring on vessels outside the three-mile limit. 
and did not provide the same protection for 
injuries occurring in harbors, although admiralty 



law applies equ.cllv to injuries upon navigable 
waters, in ports or harbors, or upon thi 
seas. 

A later provision, Section 3.1 of the | 
bill, passed in June. 1920, by Congress, 
further. That section places all seamen under 
the protection of the Federal Employees' Lia- 
bility Act, which act will be remembered as the 
one giving rights of action to railroad em- 
ployes injured in interstate commerce. At the 
present time, seamen are upon a par with rail- 
road employes in interstate commerce, with 
t lo redress of injuries. This law is 
largely inadequate. The railroad act is one 
giving a right of action for negligence only, 
end is nut based upon compensation principles. 
At the time of its a'dpptioa it was an improve- 
ment upon contemporaneous negligence laws, 
but has since been superseded by the adoption 
of State workmen's compensation acts. The 
Jones bill is. however, a great improvement 
upon the previous state of the admiralty law. 
A serious defect is that it applies only to 
seamen, and apparently does not include steve- 
dores or longshoremen within its operation. It 
ofoundly to be hoped that it will be supcr- 
at the next session of Congress by a uni- 
form Federal compensation act applying alike to 
maritime and railroad workers. 

The prospect of a uniform Federal act at the 
next session appears to be good. Such a meas- 
ure was drafted three \ and introduced 
by Senator Johnson of California, but was not 
brought up for passage, the law condemned 
in the Knickerbocker Ice Company case being 
put through instead. Since that time, the 
is informed, the bill has been with the l'nitcd 
States Shipping Board for review before intro- 
duction. Just after the decision in the Knicker- 
bocker Ice Company case, last May, the ques- 
tion was taken up hurriedly in Washington. 
According to my information, the Shipping 
Board, upon noting the inclusion of Section 33 
by Senator Jones in his bill, being the provision 
above discussed, returned Senator Johnson's bill 
in a hurry, with a statement that it met their 
entire approval. It was then too late to press 
for passage a uniform compensation measure, 
as I ongress was about to adjourn. Hence the 
inclusion of Section 33 of the Jones hill as a 

ip until the next session of Con 
Several other drafts of uniform Federal com- 
pensation acts for maritime workers are now 
being prepared, one by the American \-- 
tion for Labor Legislation. Both political par- 
ties have declared for some such measure, 
although the Democratic platform limits this 
-Herniation to a uniform compensation acl 
for w ed in loading and unloading 

vessels, and does not include sailors. It is 
to be profoundly hoped that Congress will pro- 
vide a thoroughgoing reform of the pi 
provisions of the maritime law in this respect. 

After all, the best solution would be to frame 
a thoroughly efficient federal compensation law, 
applicable to all maritime workers, ami to rail- 
road employes in interstate commerce as well. 
I do not believe any of the States which have 
tried to make their compensation laws applicable 
iritime injuries have felt that the matter 
should be permanently regulated by State laws. 
The desire to apply State lav, n, instead, 

vide some very necessary relief to seamen 
until ' should get around to provide a 

uniform national act. Three principal advan- 
tages of such Federal act are: 

(1) Uniform imposition of burden upon all 
employers engaged in maritime commerce, 
avoiding the conflicting standards of divergent 
State laws. 

(2i Opportunity to provide a compens; 
measure of high standard, superseding such acts 
in States where the compensation law is in- 
adequate or nonexistent. 

(3 1 A uniform Federal act will also avoid 
clashes between the compensation acts of dif- 
ferent States based upon the question of i 
territorial application of such laws. 

While many desirable features of a proposed 
Federal act can be suggested, in my judgment, 
the matter upon which most emphasis should 
be laid, apart from a high standard of benefits, 
is that the State boards and commissions 
should be given concurrent jurisdiction with 
the Federal court, in the enforcement of the 
Federal law. I think this can be done without 
constitutional objection, and it is now in fact 
being done with respect to injuries sustained 
by railroad employes in interstate commerce. 
In the latter case, suit can be brought under 
the Federal law in either the Federal or the 
State courts. The advantage of concurrent 
jurisdiction in State industrial accident boards 
and commissions is that such provision will 
eliminate the passing of claimants from one 
court to another with the danger of each court 
taking the- view that the suit should be brought 
in the other court. In our handling of railroad 
injuries, it frequently happens that an employe 
files an application with the Commission for 
compensation under the State law and it is 
finally determined that the suit should have 
been brought under the Federal act and before 
a tribunal. If such employe sues first in the 
courts, he is often told that he should have sued 
in the Commission, and by that time his claim 
for compensation is doubtless outlawed. If the 
suit be brought before the Commission, the 

iiitinued on Page 9.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAU 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Anti-Unionist Retired to Private Life 

Congressman Venable of Mississippi is 
the latest to go down to defeat by non- 
partisan labor. This candidate appealed 
for votes on the anti-union shop platform, 
and attacked the organized workers, who 
have retired him to private life. 

Many instances have been reported to 
the A. F. of L. national non-partisan politi- 
cal campaign committee of candidates 
standing on the anti-union shop platform. 
In the great majority of cases these candi- 
dates have been defeated by organized 
workers, who show why cheap-labor em- 
ployers support these candidates. In one 
instance a Texas candidate for Congress 
publicly solicited financial aid from these 
employers. While this candidate was nomi- 
nated, Texas trade unionists and sympa- 
thizers more than evened the score by de- 
feating a former United States Senator 
who sought the nomination for ( rovernor 
on an anti-union shop platform. 

In Labor's "victory list" is included 
United States Senator Thomas of Colorado, 
who was not even mentioned as a candi- 
date for re-election at the recent conven- 
tion of his party. During the last session 
of Congress it was almost a daily occur- 
rence for this lawmaker to attack or- 
ganized labor on the floor of the Senate. 
Me was an inspiration to every anti-union- 
ist and cheap labor employer in the land. 
But when Senator Thomas was called upon 
to face his constituents in a political cam- 
paign, he quit. 

In Alabama Senator Underwood was 
nominated by a narrow margin, as was 
Senator Smith of Arizona and trade union- 
ists of these States are enthusiastic over 
their first non-partisan venture on a state- 
wide scale. 

Georgia trade unionists were more suc- 
cessful in the case of United States Sena- 
tor Hoke Smith, who was defeated, and in 
Wisconsin the political scalp of Congress- 
man Esch, joint sponsor for the railroad 
bill, dangles from the belt of LaCrosse 
labor. 

Labor's non-partisan activity has already 
resulted in the disappearance of many re- 
actionaries from the national law making 
body. New faces will replace those who 
were confident that their labor attacks 
would assure campaign funds from power- 
ful anti-union sources. Organized labor 
wrecked the scheme by abandoning party 
lines and defeated these enemies who im- 
agined they could keep the workers divided 
by raising the wolf cry : "Gompers is try- 
ing to deliver the labor vote." 

Numerous candidates for lesser offices 
have also been defeated. The list includes 
every office from town tax assessor and 
councilman to Governors of States. 

These advances have been made possible 
by the awakening of the wage earners to 
their political strength when used as the 
balance of power against enemies of the 
men and women of toil and in the interest 
of justice and Americanism. 



Labor's No-Partyism Plan Succeeds 

Labor's non-partisan political program 



has passed the "explaining" stage. Its 
effectiveness is shown by heavy scores 
against the plunder crew who look upon 
government as a thing for private use. 

Labor has done more than defeat Sena- 
tors, Congressmen and Governors. It has 
impressed workers that this government 
is "of, by and for the people." 

It has triumphed after 40 years of agi- 
tation by smashing a blind partisanship 
that cloaked injustice and justified wrong. 

Today candidates must stand on their 
records. The edict of a secret caucus or 
appeals to "stand by the party" no longer 
suffice. 

Non-partisanship is a national charac- 
teristic. The independent voter is no longer 
a curiosity. 

For nearly half a century labor has in- 
sisted that partisanship is reaction's best 
asset, and labor has served democracy 
by destroying partisanship. 

Every year the tide of non-partisanship 
mounts higher and higher. This year the 
wave has reached a record point. 

This year labor is better organized, 
more intelligent, more determined in its 
fight for justice, for freedom of action, 
for Americanism as understood by the 
Fathers. 

The non-partisan wave will not recede. 
Tt will continue upward as labor awakens 
to the need for and the value of an in- 
telligent, independent ballot. 

The A. F. of L. national non-partisan 
political campaign committee is develop- 
ing this intelligence. Records of candi- 
dates for national offices are published, 
platform declarations are made known, 
literature is supplied wage earners, who 
are urged to study these documents and 
then vote against labor's enemies and in 
the interest of humanity and justice. 

The non-partisan method will become 
more effective as wage earners sense the 
ideals of liberty, progress, and democracy 
and social justice that are behind a ballot 
cast for these qualities rather than for 
pillars of reaction and special privilege. 



Injunction Blocked by Anti-Labor Rule 

Attorneys for striking machinists at Cin- 
cinnati successfully turned a decision by 
the United States Supreme Court, which 
invalidated the Federal Child Labor law, 
against anti-union employers who asked 
for an injunction. 

The injunction plea was made before 
Federal Judge Cochran of the eastern 
district of Kentucky on the ground that 
the machinists were interfering with in- 
terstate commerce. Federal Judge Killets, 
Toledo (Ohio) district, recently issued an 
injunction against machinists on strike 
against the Overland Automobile Com- 
pany for this reason and the anti-union 
lawyers called Judge Cochran's attention 
to this injunction. 

The machinists' attorneys called the 
court's attention to the United States Su- 
preme Court's decision on the child labor 
law two years ago. This law prohibited 
the shipment in interstate commerce of 
any commodity made in a plant that em- 

(Continued on Page 11) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 
International Seamen's Union of America, 

355 North Clark St., Chicago, 111. 
[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 

International Seamen's Union of America will 

be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia— 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg, Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South 
Australia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot, Office, Maryborough, Queensland 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland 
Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London F., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 -Railway Street, Hull 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 
Internationale Transportarbeiter-Federation 
Fngelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE 
General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan, F. 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 

Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 dc Longgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade, 15 Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, V. Strand- 
strade 20, Cobenhavn. 

HOLLAND 

Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

AUSTRIA 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 

beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

ITALY 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S. Marcellino 6-2, Italy. 

SPAIN 

Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocincros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle In- 
glaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL 

Associacao dc Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao dc San Feliz 18, Rio dc Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregaods em Ca- 
inara, Rue dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



+ -+ 


World's 


Workers 


* 




* 



Two hundred thousand men and 
women are said to have taken part 
in the funeral of Bela Somogyi, the 
editor oi" the Hungarian Socialist 
paper "Nepsazava." Somogyi was 
executed for being a Socialist by the 
murder government of Hungary 
operating under Allied auspices. 

A housing organization consisting 
of tour large employers and the 
Building Trades' Federation has been 
formed with the object of building 
500 houses in Wellington, New 
Zealand, within the next twelve 
months. The controlling body will 
represent the employers, workers, 
and government. 

Opposition to piece work was re- 
corded by the recent annual conven- 
tion of the National Metal Workers' 
Union of Belgium, which has grown 
from 18,000 in 1919 to 146,000 this 
year. During the past several months 
the union has waged many success- 
ful lights for a minimum wage and 
the eight-hour day. 

Radical meetings are becoming 
increasingly frequent in Japan. Fifty 
policemen watched a meeting in 
Tokio recently where M. Shaman 
spoke attacking a social system that 
permitted non-producers to eat. "He 
who doesn't work must not eat," 
Shaman declared, and after several 
addresses along similar lines the po- 
lice stopped the meeting. Fighting 
followed and many persons in the 
assembly were arrested. 

In the House of Commons recent- 
ly members stated slavery was be- 
ing encouraged in Hong Kong 
(British), boys and girls being pub- 
licly bought and sold. Colonel Avery, 
for the Government, alleged that 
these boys and girls were not bought 
but ''adopted for domestic service" 
for a lump sum. "If the girls were 
used for immoral purposes the court 
could watch over them," he said. 
Previous to this reply the Colonial 
office promised the General Federa- 
tion of Trades Unions that the mat- 
ter would be looked into if it were 
not made public property. 

At a special convention of the 
Belgian Railway Employes' Federa- 
tion it was voted to refer to the 
referendum the question of accept- 
ing the Government's plan to es- 
tablish a joint railway commission 
of an equal number of employe and 
employer representatives appointed 
by tile Minister of Labor on recom- 
mendation of both parties in interest. 
( )pposition to the commission is 
based on the belief that it will de- 
vitalize the trade union by taking 
over much of its work. The con- 
vention favored the plan and has 
passed it to the referendum for final 
action. 

At the annual convention of the 
Belgium Trade Union Federation the 
Government was called upon to re- 
move restrictions against workers 
who would strike to improve condi- 
tions. The workers are demanding 
the same liberty against enforced 
labor that Belgium people demanded 
when the Germans invaded that 
country. Legally Belgium workers 
have the right to strike, but judicial 
decisions have reached the point 
where strikers are penalized as viola- 
of "liberty to labor." The 
Government promised to * remove 
these restrictions, but as yet has 
failed to do so. The trade unionists 
also demand that the Government in- 
crease out-of-work benefits, which 
now amount to but a pittance and 
fall far short of supplementing the 
trade union benefits, as it was in- 
tended to do. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boot* 

See them at M BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

5291/;. BEACON STREET. SAN PEDRO CAt 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under hit. undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



4V3 
KERSUNI 



For Twenty Years we have Issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 
eful Colleetive Bargaining 
Ids Both Strikes and Lookouts 
1 itsputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loval union men and women, we ask 

vou to demand shoes bearing the above 

■•»■ t'nion Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLLIS LOVELY. General President CHARLES L. BAINE. General SMretary-Treasurer 



UNIOfwferAMP 

Factory 



IS INDEPENDENCE 
YOUR GOAL? 

If you spend less than you earn, ami save tin- 
difference, you are on your way to independence. 

WORK AND SAVE 

must be part of the plan — safe investment another 

INVEST YOUR SAVINGS 



in 



GOVERNMENT SAVINGS 
SECURITIES 

PRICES IN JUNE 

Thrift Stamps at Twenty-five Cents 

$ 5 Government Savings Stamps for $ 4. IT 

$ 100 Treasury Savings Certificates for 83.40 

$1000 Treasury Savings Certificates for 834.00 



FOR SALE AT BANKS AND POST OFFICES 

GOVERNMENT LOAN ORGANIZATION 

SECOND FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICT 

120 Broadway ... New York 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Will H. Peterson and G. Johnson, 
formerly winchmen of S. S. "Carmel" 
to communicate with J. T. Smith, 
Room 411, 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 9-8-20. 



Any one Knowing ttne whereabouts 

of the brother of August W. Stras- 

din, will please communicate with 

1 B. I. FaSelle, 924 Crocker Bldg., 

' San Francisco. 9-15-20 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SEAMEN'S FREE 
READING ROOM 

\ PLEASANT PUCE FOB ALL BKAMBi 
WHILE IN PHILADELPHIA. Ml BOARDING 
OK SHIPPING. NOTHING TO SELL 

332 SOUTH FRONT ST.. PHILADELPHIA. 

H. 8IM0NSEN UK. II. I'. HcHENBY 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

The Griffin House 

AT NORFOLK, VA. 
Furnished Rooms with H"t Baths 
Phones: 

i 813 Plume St. 

27852 (20 W.st lints St. 

ion Warren Crescent 



Navigation School 

License Guaranteed or Fee Refunded. 

Mates' Courses, $55.00 

WRITE FOR CUtCUL IR 

Sextants, best makes, from $117.50; 

Octants. $7^.50; Marine Night Glasses 

from $27.50— Best Makes. 

CAPTAIN PENNRICH 

36 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Near Borough Hall Sub. Station 



I 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Lais the Fancy Prices 
MOTE — S. G. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Mads Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
>d Floor, Bank of San Pedro. 110 W. 6th 8«. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 



— or — 



A SQUARE MEAL 

- Try - 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAM8EN. Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

NOTHING, SHOES. HATS, RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

:07 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN. Prop. 



When making purchases from our 
advertiser?, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Chas. T. Smith, Roy Dresser, Joe 
P,an. Autti Hanks, Thos. Wolsten- 
holme. Chas. Fraser, W. B. Pierce, 
Karl Olson. William Holmes kindly 
communicate with John T. Smith, 
Room 411, 112 Market St., San 
Francisco. 10-6-20 



To the members of the crew of the 

S. S. "J. Acoh." 

As 1 previously notified you the 
court gave judgment for fifty-three 
days' penalty amounting to $118 and 
$10 for shortage of potatoes, $328 in 
all, a $90 wage the others pro- 
portional- Subsequently after the 
judge went away the penalty was cut 
to 53 days at $3 per day. making the 
amount $169 each on a $90 wage, the 
curt thinking that because the crew 
were paid wages to the time of their 
arrival in San Francisco, the Gov- 
ernment should get credit for that. 
I believe the court was in error as 
the pay to San Francisco was under 
contract for time actually consumed, 
and had nothing to do with the 
penalty for not paying off in Manila, 
at least what was easily ascertain- 
able there. I think the case should 
be appealed, and will appeal it un- 
less a majority of the crew write 
me they do not want it appealed. If 
appealed it will be on the calendar 
for argument in February and may 
cided in March or April, or not 
later than May. The question as to 
transportation can also be again 
raised on appeal, and I think it 
should be. 

"West Inskip" and "Cochapontes" 

salvage cases. Both salvage cases are 

set for trial for November 5, 1920, 

the first day the court could give. 

1. W'. Hutton. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine 



A fleet of 285 wooden steamers, totaling 994,- 
23? deadweight tons is offered for sale by the 
Shipping Board. The sale will be private and 
bids will be received until October 8, and then 
opened. 

Puget Sound advices state that the Deep Sea 
Salvage Company, which has been selling stock 
on the representation that it proposed to raise 
the wreck of the steamship "Sophie," from 
the Lynn Canal, is in the hands of S. B. Hill, 
appointed receiver by the Supreme Court. 

The tanker "Stockton," which was recently 
launched at the Moore shipyards, had her 
trial trip on San Francisco Bay during the week 
and passed all requirements. The vessel has 
been allocated by the Shipping Board to 
Struthers & Dixon and will be kept on the 
Pacific Coast. 

The steamer "Bee," 375 tons, has been sold 
to the Hawaiian Meat Company for use in the 
interisland trade. The price is said to be $115,- 
000. The Bee was built at Aberdeen in 1907 
and was engaged in the lumber trade between 
Puget Sound and San Francisco for several 
years. 

The power boat "Defender," Seattle, bound 
from Columbia River to Seattle, which landed 
high and dry on the shifting sands near Queets 
River, has been taken to pieces. All the valuable 
material in her was brought in on the power 
boat "Blazer." Insurance companies saw no 
other way of salving her. 

J. H. A. Day has been appointed agent for the 
Shipping Board at Manila and will sail from San 
Francisco on the Ecuador next month for the 
new post, it was announced during the week. 
He has been with the Shipping Board at Wash- 
ington and will spend the next couple of weeks 
studying Pacific Coast conditions at the San 
Francisco offices of the board. 

According to word received by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce from George B. 
McGinty, secretary of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, the date of the hearing in San 
Francisco on the proposed uniform ocean and 
rail bill of lading has been set for October 
25. The hearings will be held at the Palace 
Hotel. 

The 10,100-ton deadweight oil tanker "Algon- 
quin," now nearing completion at Alameda, 
Cal., for the Standard Transportation Company 
(Standard Oil of New York), is the first vessel 
launched on private account from the yard of 
the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation since 
August, 1917, when the yard was requisitioned 
by the Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

Because it is considered an obstruction to 
navigation, the hulk of the old steamer "Juliet," 
sunk in the channel near Seventh street, is to 
be blown up. The "Juliet" was an ancient 
stern-wheel river boat, once belonging to the 
E. V. Rideout Company. Years ago an un- 
successful attempt was made to salve the old 
hulk for its timbers- Diver Martin Lund has 
been engaged to dynamite the craft. 

Honolulu is again to have the service of a 
coast guard vessel. The eagle boat Earp is 
being fitted up at Mare island Navy yard pre- 
paratory to being taken to the Hawaiian islands 
by Lieutenant-Commander C. F. Howell of the 
Coast Guard Service. The Earp is one of the 
vessels built at the Ford automobile factory dur- 
ing the war. It resembles a destroyer, but is 
only 200 feet long. It is equipped with two 
four-inch guns and an anti-aircraft gun. There 
has been no coast guard boat in the islands since 
the war. 

Singapore and Manila hereafter will be ports 
of call for liners of the China Mail Steamship 
Company, according to an announcement by 
General Passenger Agent Harold N. Thomas. 
These extensions, it is said, are made neces- 
sary by progressive offerings in both passenger 
and freight business. The new schedule pro- 
vides that the steamers "Nile" and "China" will 
make Singapore a regular stop after touching 
at Hongkong and that the "Nanking" will go 
to Manila from Hongkong. Singapore will be 
included in the itinerary of the "Nile" when 
she steams from San Francisco December 11. 
Under the control of the Harriman. Dear- 
born and Livermore interests some of the 
American-Hawaiian freighters, which formerly 
plied between Hawaii, San Francisco and Salina 
Cruz, are already on the berth to come back 
to the Pacific on the Coast to Coast run. This 
announcement was made this week by Wil- 
liams, Dimond & Co., which firm will be agents 
for the United American Lines, operators of 
the vessels. The vessels will be on the coast- 
to-coast run only. They will not make the 
triangular call at Hawaiian ports, Practically no 
sugar is sent direct to New York now from 
Hawaii since the up-river refinery has been en- 
larged and it all comes to San Francisco via 
the Matson service. So the new service will be 
purely and simply for general cargo between 
all Atlantic ports and San Pedro, San Fran 
cisco, Portland ami Puget Sound. 

Foreign trade through tin- port of San Fran- 
cisco was the smallest during August of any 
month this year. Exports were nearly $7,000,000 
less than in July and below any August since 



1916. Imports of duty-free merchandise were 
$2,000,000 below July, and importations of tax- 
able merchandise were only about .half of the 
July figure. Exports during August totaled $13,- 
878,683, while in July they were $20,284,731. In 
August, 1919, they were over $20,000,000. Im- 
ports of duty-free merchandise last month were 
$15,343,596 and dutiable merchandise $5,155,- 
537. In August, 1919, they were $17,726,798 and 
$9,946,951, respectively. Dwight Grady of the 
foreign J:rade department of the Chamber of 
Commerce says the falling off in business is 
due to the money panic of .Japan, low rate of 
exchange and business depression in China, 
heavy trade balance against the Philippines and 
the midyear business dullness in the East 
Indies. 

Announcement of a new agency contract for 
operators and managers of Shipping Board 
vessels is expected shortly, according to word 
received here from Washington. Confer- 
ences between the representatives of the opera- 
tors and managers and officials of the Shipping 
Board have been held for the past few weeks 
and the details of the new agreement have been 
worked out with only one or two exceptions. 
One of the changes which the Shipping Board is 
said to be insisting upon is the control of the 
sub-agents in foreign fields. Under the present 
agreement the sub-agents are selected by the 
operators. Many of these selections, it is said, 
have proved unsatisfactory to the Shipping Board 
because of the failure to aid in the establish- 
ment of a strong organization for the American 
merchant marine in foreign countries. Another 
point which is expected to be settled at the 
final conferences is the matter of fees for 
operators. The operators are in favor of the 
payment of commissions for handling the ves- 
sels instead of on a profit-sharing basis. It 
is understood that no strong opposition will be 
made to this request for a change in the 
operating agreement. 

During the passage of the German steamship 
"Lucie Woerman" through the Panama Canal 
on September 6, on the way from Hamburg to 
Chile with some 688 seamen to man German 
sailing vessels which are to be returned to 
luirope under terms established by the Rep- 
arations Commission of the Allies, a number 
of the seamen slipped overboard and swam 
ashore with the intention of deserting. They 
began going overboard in the Gatun Lake sec- 
tion, approximately opposite Frijoles, and con- 
tinued through Gaillard Cut. As soon as the 
matter was reported a police launch ran along- 
side the ship and prevented further desertions, 
while a call was sent out for the apprehension 
of all that came to land. Up to the time of 
the clearing of the "Lucie Woerman" from 
Balboa in the afternoon of September 7, 61 
had been returned aboard, and 5, taken later, 
are now held by the police. The master of the 
vessel was unable to say how many had gone 
overboard or even to state exactly how many 
had shipped on the vessel, as he had found 
a number of stowaways and in the mutinous 
condition of the men had not been able to 
secure a check on their number. 

To hasten the expected action of President 
Wilson to order the transfer of the coast guard 
to the Navy Department, the Pacific-American 
Steamship Association, representing twenty-four 
companies, has telegraphed an appeal urging the 
President not to defer action pending the pass- 
age of legislation for the transfer. At present 
there is not a single cruising cutter between 
Cape Flattery and the Mexican border, it was 
said. The telegram sent to the President fol- 
lows: "The United States coast guard is unable 
to render adequate assistance to the American 
merchant marine, which has increased from its 
pre-war status of 2,000,000 to over 10,000,000 
tons. The coast guard facilities for rendering 
assistance at sea, instead of being increased, 
have steadily decreased during this period. Of 
the thirty-six vessels listed as cruising cutters in 
the latest coast guard register only a very small 
percentage is able to render assistance at sea in 
heavy weather. Five of the vessels listed as 
cruising cutters are not yet built. On the other 
hand, the Navy is at all points ready and 
equipped with an ample number of the finest class 
of vessels for this purpose that can be designed 
and which can be put in service immediately at 
no expense to the Government. The season 
of winter gales is rapidly approaching and only 
the President can effect the transfer of the coast 
guard to the Navy Department in time to meet 
i the present grave emergency. To defer this 
i action pending the passage of any form of relief 
legislation would needlessly jeopardize human 
life and property. It is inconceivable if the 
present emergency is thoroughly understood that 
the Government would leave its enormous mer- 
chant marine, manned by over 100,000 officers 
and men, with practically no protection." 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION 



THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

67-69 Front Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass MILLER JENSEN, Agent 

1% Lewis Street 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Agent 

123 Twentv-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JAMES C. BURNS, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WM. MILLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. T ALFRED TAMKE, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga L. A. PARKS, Agent 

27 Houston Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla C. THEO. IVERSON, Agent 

12y 2 Libertv Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C. -ERNEST H. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. V. ROREN, Agent 

433 Court Street 

BALTIMORE, Md J. A. MORRIS, Agent 

1641 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa DAVID COOK, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

MOBILE, Ala J. W. ENGLAND, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex R. M. WILSON, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

SAVANNAH. Ga 21 West Bay Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C FRANK D. WHITE, Agent 

123 East Bay Street 
Sub Aqencies: 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEAN W. MENDELL, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla CHAS. OGRAIN, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PORTLAND, Me 5 Exchange Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 669 Eddy Street 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md LAWRENCE GILL, Agent 

804 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex HARRY BROWN, Agent 

321% Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAN LYONS, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala JAMES GRACE, Agent 

11% St. Francis Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I C. BLAKNEY, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me A. ANDRADE, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga GEO. McMURDO, Agent 

523 East Bay Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla J. T. HADAWAY, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C J. T. ROBINSON, Agent 

49 Market Street 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

Headquarters: 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary. 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass F. L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

NEW BEDFORD, Mass C. E. DOUCETT, Agent 

91 North Second Street 



S T. Hogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer. Seamen's 
cases a specialty, Sixth floor, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1830.— Adv. 



BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

H. ESKIN, Secretary 

HOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 



EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
D. J. GEDDES, President 

N ';-;W HAVEN, Conn 13% Collis Str««t 

(Continued on P«« 11) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The 


Seamen's 


Journal 


Publ 


ished weekly at San Francisco 




BY THE 




SAILORS' UNION OF 


THE PACIFIC 




Established in 


1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IX ADVANCE. 

one year, by mall - $3.00 I Six months - - - $1.50 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office, Martime Hall 

r>9 Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon ol each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
3 all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice :is second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for In Section 110.'!, Act of 
October .1. 1917. authorized September T. 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they arc of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on on. 

i the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
and address. The JOURNAL is not respo 
for the expressions "i correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, ( >CT< >BER 6, 1920. 



T< WARD Till-". <;< >AI. 



The trade-union movement based upon 
constructive ideas is the logical solution 

fur industrial injustice, and as the trade- 
union movement becomes stronger and 

stronger, industrial and social injustice L6 
being gradually, but surely, eliminated in 

America. 

The consistent and insistent efforts of 
the American Federation of Labor during 
the past third of a century bears out the 
contention that "constant dripping will 
wear the hardest rock away." We very 
much doubt that the most sanguine union 
ist of thirty years ago ever dreamed that 
organized labor would occupy the high 
place in our social structure which it does 
to-day. 

The plans and efforts of the men who 
founded the American Federation of Labor 
are bearing fruit, and truly "they budded 
better than they knew." Yet, despite the 
proven results of steady progress, we have 
with us to-day the "short route artist," the 
direct actionist, who closes his eyes to 
reason and wants to plunge blindly for- 
ward and take the rank and file of the 
workers with him. He has no idea of the 
path to 1 H . followed, of the pitfalls and 
precipices on the way — his goal lies straight 
ahead, and regardless of the insurmount- 
ability of the obstacles he must plunge 
through. 

Of the wrecks which must occur in fol- 
lowing this idea he takes no heed. So long 
as he is the central figure in the play the 
costs and sacrifices amount to naught. 

At times he is successful in gathering a 
following, but in short time the road be- 
comes too rough and he skids on a dan- 
gerous curve and the whole outfit finds 
itself in a muddled condition at the foot 
of a precipice, and it generally takes a 
long time to get itself straightened out 
again. To those who have followed a 
trail through the woods the simile is easily 
understood. The blaze marks on the trees 
lead one safely over the roughest country. 
The trail max be one third longer than the 
distance by air route— here turning out to 
avoid a swamp, there making a slight de- 



tour around a rock or tree, but always 
leading to the point of destination. 

Thus it is with the American Federation 
of Labor, the greatest trail-blazer of 
modern times. The followers of this creed, 
who have traveled the trail of progrss, can 
see plainly the labor necessary to build this 
trail. Here a slump or rock, which barred 
traffic, has been removed; there a mighty tree- 
has been felled : or again a quick-sand has 
been bridged, and the path, though winding 
and devious at times, is safe to travel and 
ultimately leads to the haven of realization. 

To the workers who think for themselves 
there can he hut one safe trail of unionism. 
blazed and cleared by the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. This trail, while admittedly 
slow at times, insures the worker against 
stubbed toes, bruised shins and battered 
brains. Moreover, it is the one tried and 
tested road toward industrial justice. 



CANADIAN SHIPBUILDING 



P< UNTED COMMENT. 



Commenting on the recent Genoa confer- 
ence, held under the auspices of the League 
of Nations, Tom Chambers. Treasurer of 
the National Sailors and Firemen's Union, 
says : 

Decisions of conferences like the Genoa con- 
ference arc open to a certain amount of criticism 
owing to their peculiar constitution. For any 
proposal to become a convention it is necessary 
that it should secure on a vote a majority of 
two-thirds of those present. Concerted opposi- 
tion by the government representatives can 
always secure the defeat of any draft conven- 
ts hi, as while the employers ami workers have 
only one delegate From each country, each 
ernment has two delegates. It will "thus be 
i that not even the united efforts of em- 
ployers and employed could carry a proposal in 
face of government opposition. What, then, are 
the chances of the workers carrying a pro- 
posal when, as often happens, they find both 
the employers and the government against them" 
However well-meaning were those who drafted 
the regulations governing international i 
ferences under the auspices of the International 
Labor Office and League of Nations, it is to 
be feared that not much in the way of real 
progress can be expected from such conferem 

Our good friend Tom is not in the habit 

of writing undigested stuff. So when Tom 
expresses the fear that not much of real 
progress can he expected from conferences 
functioning under the League of Nations 
he has reached that conclusion only after 
mature deliberation. 

Senator La Follcttc. in his masterful 
analysis of the labor sections in the peace 
treaty, made it clear that instead of further- 
ing progress the very opposite results are 
likely to be obtained. And that is the prin- 
cipal reason why the International Seamen's 
Union of America has declined to join in 
organized labor's endorsement of the League 
of Nations. 



Figures compiled by the Bureau of 

Navigation show that more than half of 
the seamen on American ships are citi- 
zens of this country. The total number 
of seamen in the American merchant 
marine is given as 3.U.140. of which 1.^7.- 
016 are native-born Americans and 31,- 
777 naturalized citizens of the United 
Stales. Other nationalities represented 
are: British, 36,609; Spanish. 29,784; 
Swedish. 11,905; Norwegian. 1 1 .585 : Rus- 
sian, 9442: Danish. o82 7 ; Portuguese, 603] ; 
Italian. 3463; Filipino, 1646; Chinese, 1625; 
German, 1568; Japanese. 127o; French. 
( MX : Austrian. 664; other nations. 41. < »74. 



Looks like the Shipping Board may vet 

have to sell most of its wooden ships for 
junk. 



Shipbuilding is one id the oldest of 
Canada's industries. It flourished particu- 
larly in the days of wooden ships. In 
1863, for instance, Canadian shipyards 
built and sold to the United States wooden 
ships valued at $9,000,000. Considering 
the purchasing power of the dollar in those 
da s. that was quite an achievement for 
a country having less than three and a half 
million inhabitants. 

The industry declined when iron and 
steel were substituted for wood in the 
construction of ships. The decline per- 
sisted right up to the outbreak of the 
world war. Since then there has been a 
remarkable revival of the industry, until 
now Canada ranks as the third shipbuild- 
ing nation of the world in the number of 
ships turned out. and fourth in point of 
tonnage. 

Figures for 1918-19 show that $t>0.000.- 
000 was invested in the industry. The 
number of plants was 204, of which 90 
were shipbuilding and 114 boatbuilding. 
Nineteen plants were turning out steel ves- 
sels of a tonnage ranging all the wax- 
up to 10.000 deadweight tons. Of the 
total number of plants 72 were located 
in Nova Scotia, f>9 in Ontario, 2t> in British 
Columbia, 2*1 in Quebec. 6 in New Rrus- 
wick. 4 in Manitoba, 2 in Prince Fdward 
Island, and 2 in Alberta. The number of 
men employed was 22,486, and their 
wages amounted to $27,148,628. 

In the fiscal year 1918-19 Canada built 
148 ships aggregating 225.264 tons. It 
was this record which, as already noted, 
placed her third among the nations in 
the number of ships turned out. and 
fourth in point of tonnage. 

Since 1914 Canadian shipyards have 
built for other countries vessels valued at 
$50,000,000. Most of this output was for 
Great Britain and France. Other buyers 
were Belgium, Norway. Sweden. Italy and 
Russia. In addition, home demands have 
been met. These include 150.000 tons of 
shipping for the Dominion Government, 
with 20().fXX) tons now under way as part 
of the Government program. 

Nearly all the engines for the Canadian 
merchant marine have been made in 
Canada. Steel ship plates arc also being 
extensively manufactured at home, the 
Dominion Government figuring as the 
chief customer in that line. The leading 
plate mill is located at Sydney, N. S. 



Till' PANAMA CANAL 



The average citizen is by this time 
more or less familiar with the fact that 
the operation of the Panama Canal has 
from the very beginning been carried on 
at a financial loss to its builder and busi- 
ness manager, the United States Govern- 
ment. While the annual deficits shown 
have been trifling compared with the 
great value of the canal as a promoter 
of world commerce, they have made 
handy targets for shafts of criticism 
thrown by opponents of Government oper- 
ition of public utilities. 

But, as the old saw has it. it's a long- 
lane that has no turning. The Panama 
Canal has at last given evidence of soon 
becoming a financially paying proposi- 
tion. According to the Washington Post. 
the canal, during the last fiscal year, 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



earned a surplus over expenses of more 
than $2,000,000. The number of merchant 
vessels passing through the "big ditch" 
in the course of the year was nearly 2500, 
and the income totaled more than $8,000,- 
000. In addition, numerous naval units 
passed from ocean to ocean, their han- 
dling considerably increasing the general 
cost of operation. 

These figures constitute new records 
for the great waterway. The number of 
vessels passing through the canal during 
the year was the largest since its opening. 
The income was larger in its gross total 
than in any previous year, and the net 
earnings were, of course, something 
entirely new. To be sure, the accumu- 
lated deficit in operating costs still 
amounts to some $4,000,000. But, with 
increases in revenue based on last year's 
earnings, in two or three years at most 
the Panama Canal will begin to pay in- 
terest on the original cost of its construc- 
tion. 



LABOR CONDITIONS IN RUSSIA 



A FRATERNAL ARRANGEMENT 



While the selfish intriguing of politi- 
cians and near statesmen in high places is 
keeping the world from getting back to 
its pre-war moorings, the Russian and 
Italian workers are setting the workers 
of other nations an example of practical 
Christianity which, if generally followed, 
would soon lead to permanent "peace on 
earth, good will toward men." 

According to press dispatches, the Rus- 
sian Soviet government and the Italian In- 
stitute of Co-operators have entered into 
an agreement to trade with each other, 
supplying such necessities as are most ur- 
gently needed at the moment. It is sig- 
nificant as showing the straits to which 
Russia has been reduced by the Allied 
blockade, that the first shipment from the 
Italian CO operators will be four steamers 
loaded with medicaments. Even more sig- 
nificant is the fact that the steamers will 
be supplied by the Seamen's Union of It- 
alv. and that they are to be used exclu- 
sively for delivery of supplies to Russia. 
The plan is to establish a regular fort- 
nightly steamship service between Odessa 
and Naples. And, wonderful to relate in 
this materialistic age, the element of finan- 
cial gain will be strictly excluded from 
the undertaking. 

In addition to the medicaments, the Ital- 
ian co-Operators will deliver surgical in- 
struments, telegraph and telephone mate- 
rials, agricultural implements, locomotives, 
tools of various kinds, etc. The Russians 
on their side, so it is reported, have already 
dispatched to Italy 6,000,000 poods of 
breadstuffs, with more to follow. As a 
Russian pood is equal to 30 English 
pounds avoirdupois, it is tolerably certain 
that the Russians are not nearly so hard tip 
[or food as we have been led to believe by 
the newspapers. 

The Italian Institute of Co-operators 
also proposes to open branches in Odessa. 
MOSCOW and Reval. As the need for them 
arises other branches will be established. 
The greatest enthusiasm over the project 
is said to prevail among the workers of 
both nations. 



As we see in the rainbow the harbinger 
of fine weather, so labor ma\ see the 
-lories of its future through its tears. 



Report of British Labor Delegation Sent to 
Investigate Conditions in Soviet Russia. 



The British Labor Delegation to Russia was 
sent out by the Labor Party and the Trades 
Union Congress, acting on a resolution passed 
by a special Trades Union Congress on De- 
cember 10, 1919. This resolution demanded: 

"The right to an independent and impartial 
inquiry into the industrial, political, and eco- 
nomic conditions in Russia." 

The delegation consisted of nine persons — 
seven men and two women — and they were 
accompanied by two delegates (men) from the 
British Independent Labor Tarty. Correspondents 
of newspapers were also with the party, but 
did not accompany them in all of their in- 
vestigations. 

The report made by this delegation is dated 
July, 1920. It is too lengthy for publication 
in full. But the part dealing with "Labor" as 
well as the summary under the caption "Con- 
clusion" is printed herewith: 
Labor. 

All matters directly affecting labor are the 
concern of the Commissariat of Labor, which is 
governed by a Commissar and a board of two 
others, all of whom are nominated by the 
Central Executive Committee of the Trade 
Unions and appointed by the Council of Peo- 
ple's Commissars.* There are about 500 local 
departments in different districts and govern- 
ments. The departments of the Commissariat 
are: (1) Registration and Distribution of 
Labor; (2) Fixing of Rates of Wages; (3) 
Protection of Labor; (4) Statistics; (5) Museum 
of Labor; with subsidiary departments dealing 
with finance, organization, and internal arrange- 
ment of the Commissariat. 

Labor exchanges, of which there are 420 with 
260 branches, are now part of the labor depart- 
ment of the state, and they distribute labor for 
all purposes. Wages and hours of labor are 
fixed in accordance with the economic condi- 
tions of the country, and in practice this is 
done by the Central Executive Committee of 
the Trade Unions. During the war it has been 
necessary to allow the employment of children 
and young persons; but it is hoped to with- 
draw all persons up to 16 years of age from 
industry at an early date. Overtime is en- 
couraged in factories and workshops, and double 
employment is undertaken. Children of 16 are 
not allowed to work more than six hours a day. 
All hours over eight are paid as overtime, and 
the workshop votes on the number of hours to 
lie worked overtime. Women work the same 
hours as men, but for eight weeks before and 
eight weeks after confinement they are excused 
from work and receive full pay. 

An average wage for a normal month's work 
varies from 1200 to 4500 rubles according to 
skill. Those out of work receive the total 
unskilled wages, whether they are skilled or 
unskilled, plus dinners and ration card en- 
titling them to purchase goods at fixed prices. 
Those unemployed must accept suitable work 
if offered, under penalty of forfeiting their pay. 
Specialists and technicians receive very much 
higher rates of pay. At the present time there 
can be very little unemployment in Russia, 
although exact figures are lacking. The diffi- 
culty is to prevent men leaving the factories 
and workshops and going to the country. Mem- 
bership of trade unions is compulsory, and em- 
braces all persons without "exception engaged 
in an industry or institution- A trade union 
in a factory includes technical staff, clerks, 
engineers, skilled and unskilled workers. A trade 
union in a hospital includes orderlies, char- 
women, stokers, dispensers, nurses, clerks, and 
doctors. Labor is also compulsory for all 
able-bodied men and women of eighteen years 
and over up to fifty. 

The difficulties of the situation were seen by 
the delegation in the ragged and half-starved 
condition of the workers at Sormova and 
Putilov works. They were drawn forcible at- 
tention to by a worker from the Kolomna 
works, who stated that desertions from the 
works were frequent, and that deserters were 
arrested by soldiers and brought from the 
villages. The workers at Kolomna were stated 
to receive about 4000 rubles a month or 
48,000 a year, while the living of an ordinary 
peasant reckoned at ordinary market prices was 
valued at three and a half million rubles a year. 
Also, the peasants are willing to employ men at 
much higher money wages than they can get in 
the factories and workshops, plus a plentiful 
supply of food, which the town worker does not 
get. 

M. Karl Radek, secretary of the Third In- 
ternational, says to the workers: "No surprise 
is entertained at your having fled to the villages 
to escape starvation, but the entire country is 
domed to ruin and famine unless you return 
to town." 

The direction in which interesting develop- 
ments of trade union activity may occur is seen 
in the account of the visit paid to Chatura 
Electricity Works, where peat is used as a 
source of power. Here the workers, who are 
peasants, and who work only two and a half 



OFFICIAL 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 4, 192(1. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Andrew Furuseth presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping medium, with large number 
of members ashore. The Quarterly Finance 
Committee reported found Union's accounts 
correct for the past three months. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 
Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS 



Members at San Francisco must not ship 
themselves to join vessels at Agencies. Those 
that do will be required to conform to Shipping 
Rules of Agencies. 

This rule adopted at regular meeting, San 
Francisco, Cal., August 30, 1920. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 

Secretary, p. t. 

Vancouver, B. C. Sept. 27, 192(1. 
Shipping very dull; prospects uncertain. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 27, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospect- uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 27, 1920. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL. Agent. 
84 Seneca Street. P.O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 27, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 27, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88y 2 Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 27, 192(1. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 2d, 1920. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JOSEPH FALTUS, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



MARINE COOKS'- AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal.. Sept. 30. 1920. 

I he regular weekly meeting was called to 
order at 7 p. m. Eugene Burke in the chair. 
Secretary reported shipping improving. It was 
decided to establish an agency in Portland, Ore. 
The report of the Quarterly Finance Committee 
finding books, stub bills, cash on hand and in 
bank correct was read and adopted. Shipping 
improving. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

No. 42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 23, 1920. 
Shipping medium; second cooks scarce. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room No. 203. P. O. 
Box 214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 23, 192(1. 
Shipping medium; no quorum; snipping good; 
irw members ashore. 

JOSEPH MACK, Agent. 
No. 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 54. Phone 
Sunset 547-W. 



DIED 
lames J. Harvey, No. 3057, a native of Maine. 



the S. S. 



* Interview with M. Schmidt, Commissar for Labor. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



age 67. Died at sea on board 
"Osaqumsick," September 17, 1920. 

Putting into Noumea September 30, the 
barkentine "F.cola" is reported leaking, in a 
cablegram received by the marine department of 
the Chamber of Commerce. The "Ecola" was 
bound for Sydney from Astoria, and until she 
was disabled hail made excellent time from the 
Pacific port, having sailed across iii fifty-three 
days to the New Caledonia port. The "Ecola" 
was formerly a Shipping Board steamer, but was 
converted into a windjammer. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ON THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Contributed by the Atlantic and Gulf Seamen's Unions 



THE MAN JACK. 



In a recent issue of The [ndependent, 
X. Y., Admiral W. S. Benson, Chairman of 
ihe United States Shipping Board, presents 
an interesting discussion of the present con- 
dition and needs of the American Merchant 
Marine in active competition for the world's 
carrying trade, and hopes and prospects 
for its future and further development and 
permanent success under existing commer- 
cial and legal exactions and international 
trade rivalries. 

We all admire the energetic and dignified 
old Admiral, as all loyal American seamen 
should, hut since he. admittedly, regards .all 
sea service from the viewpoint and bias 
of an old and conservative naval officer, we 
cannot always accept his personal concep 
tions of maritime excellence as conclusive 
or binding upon ourselves. 

In the course of his article Admiral Ben- 
son says: "One of our basic needs is more 
of the right kind of youths trained for the 
sea who will enter our service at the bottom 
rung with the hope, ambition and power 
ultimately to own the ship." Rijrht here is 
a good place to knock :>ff reading and begin 
to proceed. 

At this particular point in his discourse 
our admirable defender and expounder of 
modern maritime methods seems to have 
become more enthused by patriotic zeal than 
inspired by practical sense. He appears to 
be thinking backwards, forgetting that 
visions of past successes in the American 
Merchant Marine have no application what 
soever to the practical theories of today. 
All ideas of individual success, and pre- 
eminence in the Merchant Marine have been 
long since dispelled by corporate ownership 
and operation under the new regime. 

Tn the good old days, when hearts of 
oak so loved an oaken keel, when the spice 
traders of Newburyport, the South Sea 
traders of boston, when the venders of cheap 
calico and Salem witchcraft corrupted the 
natives of Old Calabar and gave -them rum 
for ivory, and glass beads for gold nuggets, 
when the New Bedford whalers could he 
trailed by the grease in their wake, and 
located by the stench from their trv kettle-, 
oh. yes, sir Admiral, in those palmv and 
historic days, an American youth of the 
right stamp, more especially if he belonged 
to the right family and professed the family 
creed, might possibly rise to the rank and 
estate oi master, owner and merchant in his 
own ship, and conduct his own enterprises 
and over-sea ventures on an individual hasis. 

but those were the days of sparsely-set- 
tled country, when the wast interior of the 
United Stales was, practically speaking, a 
terra incognita; when our amazing internal 
resources were not even dreamt of, and all 
along our extensive coast lines were 
turned seaward instead of landward. 

Tn those days, too, many master- were 
monsters, many merchants were madmen, 
and the church spires of Ww England were 
tarnished with gold. 

All seamen were slaves, sold in the mar- 
ket places of arrogant commercialism: Miij >- 
ping articles were pretenses, and the marine 
laws were lie-. The "cat" was king, the 
bloody belaying-pin his prime minister, and 



the power to imprison was secretary of 
slate. 

Yes, it must lie admitted that in those his- 
toric times the fellow who proceeded to sea 

on the "me first" motto, with the physical 
force to demonstrate his opinions to all 
before him, and the influence, moral or im- 
moral, to hack them up behind him. had a 
chance to succeed and some day own his 
-hip— and her crew as well. 

But the God-fearing sailor of obscure de- 
gree, who entered the service knowing 
nothing hut his duty and his prayers, al- 
ways found that the residue and remainder 
of his earnings, laboriously counted into his 
calloused palm at the end of a two or three 
years' voyage, would not suffice to huv a 
kedge anchor. 

The youth who enters the merchant ma- 
rine today has no more hope or expectation 
of ultimately owning his ship than a brake- 
man has of owning the train on which he 
rides. 

fhe youth or young man entering tin 
service to-day is not obsessed by am' such 
fallacious notions of personal ownership. If 
he is at all sincere in his efforts to succeed 
in his chosen profession, his first ambition 
will he to reach the bridge by the shortest 
possible route, and there, if he succeeds in 
Securing a hand-hold, to work himself up to 
the top of his profession by sheer merit, in- 
industry, loyalty and force of character. 

We are living in the era of great enter- 
prises and miraculous discoveries. The days 
ot corporate ownership, co-operative manage- 
ment and collective bargaining are here, as 
far as the \merican merchant marine is 
concerned. 

The only seamen now capable of owning 
or operating ships independently and out- 
right are the organized seamen acting col- 
lectively as a corporation. They alone of 
all national organizations, financial or cor 
porate. have the power to do this: for tiny 
alone posse-- the skill, the numbers, the 
knowledge, the training and the power in 
every department of sea service contained 
within themselves, and within their own 
ranks to make a ship go, to keep her con- 
tinuously at sea and bring her safely to port 
without employing outside help. 

But a sailor in the merchant marine, hop- 
ing to own his own ship, is like a baby cry- 
ing for the moon, with the same result — the 
baby is still here and the moon forever there. 

fn his next paragraph Admiral Benson 
calls attention to the record- of the Sea 
Placement bureau, to which he alludes a- 
"most encouraging," as showing that six out 
of every ten men entering the service in 
Shipping Board ships during the last six 
months have been "American citizens." 

"And this percentage," he avers, "is grow- 
ing higher every week." 

"In 1917," continues the Admiral, "only 
10 per cent, of the men below the grade of 
officers placed on our ship- by our New 
York office, were American-. During the 
la-t -ix months the average has been ^5.7 
per rent." Aii encouraging showing indeed. 

Very good so far. hut now let us quote 
one more sentence from Admiral Benson's 
statement just to get the drift of hi- argu- 
ment. 



I 



"It was necessary during the war." he 
continues, "to give wide employment in the 
merchant marine to the nationals of the 
countries allied with the United States. Most 
valuable senicc icas rendered b\ these men 
and theirs was a great contribution toward 
the winning of the WOT. But now the time 
has come to replace these men with Amer- 
icans." 

Yes, Sir Admiral! And for fifty year 
prior to the outbreak of the European con- 
flict foreign seamen of all nationalities had 
been serving continuously in both the mer- 
chant marine and navy of the United States, 
and they, all of them, at all times and under 
all circumstances and conditions, rendered 
loyal and unselfish service to the country 
under the American flag. 

When the conditions in the American 
merchant marine had become so vile and 
unbearably cruel and degrading that all 
Americans fled from it, and American par- 
ents would rather see their sons go to prison 
than to sea, the trained seamen of foreign 
nations still continued to sail in American 
ship-, in spite of evil and tyrannical treat- 
ment, through good report and had, and 
continued : 

To carry aloft the Star- and Stripe-, 

Against old England's boast, 

Paul Jones, the terror of the sea. 
Will fly them on her coast. 

We think it comes with an ill grace: we 
regard it as an act of basest ingratitude 
when a dignified and influential Admiral, rep- 
resenting both the naval and maritime opin- 
ions oi the mightiest and most prosperous 
power on earth, deliberately proposes to dis- 
card and disregard the rights and int. 
of a body of seamen who, through peace and 
war. have upheld the power and dignity, and 
defended the safety and supremacy of the 
United States of America for more than half 
a century at the surrender of their liber- 
ties, their personal welfare, their happiness 
and their live-, simply because they did not 
happen to be born within the United States. 

What honest argument can.be advanced 
in favor of such a course ? 

These seamen having proven their faith 
in our country, and their loyalty and de- 
votion to our Hag in times of stress. 
through storm and wrack, through breach 
.and battle, are they not fully and honor- 
ably entitled to all the rights of citizen 
.-hip? 

Remove the foreign trained seamen of 
American citizenship from the merchant 
marine to-day and you withdraw the back- 
bone and being of the service. 

Neither the training ships nor the re- 
cruiting camps have yet produced one real 
American seaman of native birth, and the) 
never will. Neither will the steamships. 
Neither will the United States Navy. All 
these services combined cannot, under 
present conditions, produce one genuine 
. I hie Seaman. 

'fhe poorest class of seamen being re- 
cruited to the merchant marine to day are 
those who have previously received naval 
training. It was ever thus. It was so 
win u tlu navj was under canvas ; it was 
so in the days of the old steam frigates, 
when steam power was merely auxiliary 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



to sail. It is still more so now when every 
naval operation, from the engine compart- 
ments to the galley ranges, from the gun 
turrets to the ash ejectors, are purely 
mechanical or mechanically controlled. 

Men brought up by machinery never 
learn to work by hand, and men trained to 
perform in battalions can never be tied 
to individual tasks. 

It makes a world of difference to the 
man-o'-warsman whether there are a thou- 
sand men on deck working in detachments 
or relays, or whether there are ten men 
in the forecastle all required to work indi- 
vidually at any task on the ship. The 
amount of work, the hard work and the 
wide variety of duties appall him ; he feels 
ill at ease, away from home, out of his 
sphere. 

In sailing ship clays it was precisely the 
same. A man-o'-war carried enough men 
to dress ship and man all her yards stand- 
ing shoulder to shoulder, whereas a mer- 
chant ship of the same size or larger did 
not carry crew enough to man one star- 
board yard-arm, with immensely more 
work to do. 

If all the young men in the merchant 
marine were to be closely questioned, as 
we have often questioned some, it would be 
learned from their replies, as is constantly 
shown by their actions and conduct on 
hoard, that a great many of them have 
no sincere purpose to serve in entering 
the merchant marine. 

Some admit that they are only cruising 
around to see the world ; others confess 
that they are there to escape hard work 
ashore and have a good time ; some are 
going abroad just to escape prohibition 
and get somewhere where the land is 
"wet": man\" are there to collect high 
wages for work they don't know how to 
do. and many are there just as a passing 
necessity to keep off the beach and out of 
jail. Upon such evasive and dishonest 
pretexts no competent merchant marine 
personnel can ever be built up. 

In justice to the patriotism of the large 
number of honest, stalwart young men 
constantly seeking in good faith to qualify 
for admission and enrollment in the mer- 
chant marine, there should be held on 
board every training ship, and in every 
camp or shore station where apprentices 
are being prepared to enter the merchant 
marine, periodical elimination contests, 
both oral and practical, in which all com- 
petitors should be required to show, or 
demonstrate both sincerity and ability in 
their desire to enter the merchant marine. 

The real school, the true and only school 
of actual and practical training in the arts 
and operations of effective seamanship, is 
the square-rigged sailing ship engaged in 
national service and international traffic. 
There, and there only, can seamen acquire- 
in actual service and intensive training the 
practical knowledge and develop the in- 
ward sea-sense that will enable them to 
grapple with all emergencies, overcome all 
obstacles and perform seeming impossi- 
bilities in contending with the elements for 
the safety of lives and valuable property 
committed to their charge. 

And until the Government of the United 
States becomes sufficiently enlightened to 
create and put into commercial operation 
for the practical education and training, 
and case hardening of our bridge and sub- 



ordinate officers as well, we will never 
have a really efficient personnel, nor achieve 
the maximum of safety and loyalty in our 
new merchant marine. 

Admiral Benson tells us that he has 
served altogether nearly 45 years in the 
U. S. Navy. We have served just about 
the same length of time in the merchant 
marine, having entered the service at Bos- 
ton on February 28, 1876. In that time 
we have served in everything, from a 
jolly-boat to a full-rigged ship, from a 
Chinese junk to an ocean liner, and from 
a menhaden fisherman to a New Bedford 
whaler. We speak therefore from expe- 
rience, if not with authority. 

We cannot concur in the opinion that a 
naval man, whatever his rank, is the one 
best qualified to discuss the requirements 
of the merchant marine. 

We regard it as a most unfortunate cir- 
cumstance that Admiral Benson should 
have taken it in hand to write the article 
to which we have alluded above without 
first consulting some of his less exalted 
but more practical-minded admirers among 
the old shell-backs still kicking about in 
the merchant marine. 

There are many occasions, we believe, 
when the professional and the practical 
minds should be closely associated to at- 
tain the best results, and this was one of 
those important times. 

And we regard it as little short of a 
public calamity that the Admiral's article 
and opinions should have been published 
in The Independent, because we know of 
no other periodical wherein its dissemina- 
tion could possibly accomplish so much 
harm. 

Admiral Benson's article is, unintention- 
ally, but nevertheless gravely, misleading, 
and owing to his rank, his public standing 
and popularity, as well as his authorita- 
tive position in maritime affairs, his state- 
ments will be accepted like gospel by a 
public that loves to be cajoled, and by 
thousands of young recruits in the mer- 
chant marine who just fatten on flattery 
laid on thick. 

And The Independent, a high grade and 
highly reputable educational magazine, will 
carry and disseminate among hundreds of 
thousands of eager and confiding pupils 
studying at high schools throughout the 
United States the authoritative informa- 
tion that half-trained or untrained youths 
are good enough for the new merchant 
marine; that merchant marine needs can be 
judged by naval experience; that genuine 
seafaring men of the seven seas who have 
served our country nobly and fearlessly, in 
peace and in war, for fifty or sixty years 
during untalkecl-of periods when our own 
nationals refused to serve, are soon to be 
dropped from the rolls, because by the 
laws of Nature they did not happen to be 
born in the United States. 

This is certainly an unfortunate combi- 
nation of events; but if it must be done, 
then let us make a good wholesale job of 
it, that we may not be charged by specta- 
tor nations with unfair discrimination. 

Let us drop Christopher Columbus. 
Amerigo Vespucci, Thaddeus Kosciusko, 
the Marquis de Lafayette, Count Rocham- 
beau, John Paul Jones. General Franz 
Siegel, John Erickson, and all the rest oi 
the brilliant galaxy of American patriot! 
of foreign birth from the rolls of Amer 



ican history, from the scrolls of American 
honor, and from the sacred memories of 
the past that cluster round the immortal 
dead. 

James H. Williams. 



Don't think because the war in Europe 
is over that the fight for human rights is 
over; the chances are that that fight will 
never be over as long as you and I are 
on this little earth. 



If Abraham Lincoln were alive to-day 
he would probably say: "Thank God, we 
have a labor movement that can sustain a 
strike until it accomplishes something." 



SEAMEN'S COMPENSATION LAWS 
(Continued from page 2) 

Commission having power to apply either the 
State or Federal compensation law as the facts 
may appear, this confusion is avoided. There 
is no possibility of the claim being outlawed or 
claimant told to commence his suit over again 
in a different court, and the worst that can 
happen, if the decision of the board or com- 
mission be reversed, is that the case will be 
sent back to the same body to apply the other 
law upon the testimony already taken. 
Interim Modes of Relief. 

When the decision was announced in the 
Knickerbocker Ice Company case, various Cali- 
fornia stevedoring concerns immediately took 
up with our Commission, and with their insurance 
carriers, the matter of continuing under the 
State workmen's compensation act, the Supreme 
Court of the United States to the contrary not- 
withstanding. They took the position that ex- 
perience for some years under the State com- 
pensation act showed that such act was more 
beneficial to the employer than liability under 
the maritime law, and they desired some way 
by which they could continue to receive im- 
munity from suits in admiralty- The employes 
also intimated that they would be very much 
dissatisfied unless their employers continued to 
allow them workmen's compensation protection, 
and further intimated that labor disturbances 
might arise unless compensation protection be 
given them. It was, therefore, put squarely up 
to certain insurance companies whether they 
would continue to receive the premiums offered 
by the employers as theretofore and to pay 
losses under the compensation act as losses 
should occur. 

Some of the steamship owners also took this 
view, especially after the Jones act had been 
called to their attention, which placed them 
under the same obligation as that owed by rail- 
roads to their employes in interstate commerce. 

As a result of this pressure, a tentative agree- 
ment has been worked out to last until the 
passage of the proposed Federal act, whereby 
insurance carriers will continue to receive pre- 
miums upon their compensation policies as here- 
tofore, and will pay losses upon the scale of 
benefits provided by the compensation act. In the 
event of disagreement as to the application of 
the compensation act, the California Industrial 
Accident Commission is to be made the arbi- 
trator of the claim. In return for this arrange- 
ment the injured man is to be requested to, 
and doubtless will, in most cases, sign a re- 
lease of all rights in admiralty in return for 
the written agreement of the insurance com- 
pany to pay him such sums for his injury as 
he would be entitled to receive under the 
compensation act, if applicable. At the present 
time, this arrangement is working nicely and 
everybody seems satisfied. 

In addition, a few employers now sign con- 
tracts with their men at the time the men 
enter their employment, in advance of any 
injury, agreeing that if the man shall be injured 
while at work he shall be paid for such in- 
juries the sum of money to which he would be 
entitled to receive under the workmen's com- 
pensation act, if applicable, the men for their 
part agreeing to accept such payments in lieu 
of all right of action under the admiralty law. 
The validity of the latter agreement, entered 
into in advance of any accident, is open to some 
doubt as a matter of law. The making of such 
agreement after the accident, however, appears 
unobjectionable. With these two methods a 
modus vivendi has been reached whereby em- 
ployers and employes are both satisfied and the 
State workmen's compensation act is practically 
in effect by agreement to the satisfaction of all 
parties. Of course, this is largely a gentle- 
men's agreement, and some departure may be 
expected from it as time goes by, but probably 
not to a sufficient extent to warrant repudiation 
of this understanding between employers and 
employes. 

This, of course, is only a temporary arrange- 
ment, and we hope an adequate Federal act 
will soon be enacted which will finally solve 
all of the present difficulties. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER 

(Ry Laurence Todd) 



Election of Harding as President is to be 
the signal for a general assault upon the 
American Federation of Labor by law- 
makers, courts, police, constabulary and 
the press throughout the country, accord- 
ing to predictions confidently made here by 
men in touch with the big financial and 
commercial interests. 

Wages, they say, are too high. 

Prices are coming down — perhaps -and 
wages must come down it business is to 
remain profitable under the new regime. 

A fragment of evidence of anti-union 
activity drifts down here from Denver, in 
the following circular letter: 
Office of 

The Employers Association of Denver 
Gas & Electric Bldg., 
Denver, Colo., Sept. 10th, 1920. 
To Members: 

Realizing the importance of protecting 
our interests, we would respectfully sug- 
gest that you call up the United Americans, 
room 323 Tabor Opera House Blk., phone 
Main 2154, if you desire to get the names 
of candidates who can be safely trusted to 
combat the efforts of the unions in the next 
-lature to repeal the anti-boycott and 
anti-picketing hill. 

This is simply for your information and 
the suggestion is made to save us from the 
charge of playing the game of politics. We 
realize you are thoroughly interested in 
seeing that we do not lose any of the 
ground we have gained for the "Open 

Shop." 

The United Americans is a reputable 
organization which spends much time and 
money in running down facts that we are 
all interested in. 

Yours very truly, 
The Employers Association, 
By Herbert George, 

President. 

In connection with the United Am- 
ericans, which was formed ostensibly as 
an anti-Bolshevik league and included 
many union men, it is worth noting that 
not merely "Moocher" George of Den- 
ver supports it, hut so did — quite recently 

our old friend Frederick J. Koster, who 
has tried to make San Francisco and New 
York believe that he knew how to estab- 
lish the non-union shop by the slush-fund 
route. To a recent statement in this corre- 
spondence on Koster, one of the patricians 
of the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce has written a denial, saying that — 
"lie is devoting his time, when absent 
from this city, in continuation of the work 
that he hoped would find fruition in the 
United Americans, in relation to which we 
had our several meetings a few months 
ago. Tie is continuing this work with the 
group of men with whom he was associated 
in New York, and also as chairman of the 
American Ideals Committee of the United 
States Chamber (of Commerce). To my 
knowledge Mr. Koster has never engaged 
in any anti-union fight lure or elsewhere 
as indicated in this article, but has stood 
consistently for the principle of the right 
to 'employ union or non-union workers in 
whole or in part as the parties involved 
may elect.' " 

That ought to hold us. Likewise it ought 
to brand the United Americans and the 



American Ideals Committee of the U. S. 
Chamher of Commerce. 

Curiously enough, the bitterness of the 
organized employers and their political 
puppets is daily increasing, and centering 
on the A. F. of 1... when the executives 
of the latter body are in the very act of 
isolating the labor movement of America 
from that of the rest of the world on the 
ground that European and South American 
labor is too radical. 

The October issue of the American Fed- 
erationist announces, in an article entitled 
"The European Prainstorm," the refusal of 
the executive council of the A. F. of L. to 
join the new International Federation of 
Trade Unions — the so-called Amsterdam 
International — and declares the unalterable 
opposition of the A. F. of L. to a Socialist 
labor movement. The article, which is 
lengthy and vigorous in its use of ad- 
jectives, is signed by President Gpmpers 
and Vice-President YYoll. 

It sets fortli that the Montreal con- 
vention adopted the report of the council 
disapproving the statement issued by the 
Amsterdam International, — in which the 
phrase occurred. "Down With the Reac- 
tion! Up With Socialism!" — and calling 
for a May Day demonstration which was 
in effect a one-day strike for Socialism. 

"Since the Montreal convention," says 
the article, "matters have taken a turn for 
the worse. The Amsterdam international 
has issued throughout the world and sent 
to us for circulation in this country a 
declaration calling for international revolu- 
tionary measures by Labor in aid of the 
Soviets in their war with Poland. 

"The chairman of the British Labor 
Party (Adamson), claiming to speak for 
the British trade union labor movement, 
has sent a cablegram along similar lines, 
apparently calling for similar action. The 
contents of these messages are thoroughly 
revolutionary and obviously animated by a 
desire to use the most extreme measures 
for strengthening the hold of Soviet power 
in Russia and enabling it to extend its in- 
fluence and to dominate neighboring coun- 
tries." 

Mr. Gompers and Mr. Woll explain that 
they believe this "wild extremism" is only 
a temporary thing, ami that British and 
Continental European labor will get over 
it after a while. They charge "critical 
conditions now prevailing in Europe," and 
the use of gold by the Soviet government, 
with causing this "brainstorm." Soviet 
money, they say, is "wrung from its bleed- 
ing and starving slaves in Russia." 

The manifesto sent to the labor move- 
ments of all nations by the Amsterdam 
International on Sept. 8th is an appeal for 
cooperative effort by all labor organizations 
to force the Stoppage of wars and of the 
making and moving of war materials 

"The organized workers of the world." 
it says in part, "must from now onwards 
he prepared to act in accordance with the 
decisions arrived at by the international 
conferences at Berne and Amsterdam, and 
to utilize every available resource in the 
struggle against all wars. * * * 

"Not a train carrying munitions must be 
worked; not a ship laden with war mater- 
ials must he allowed to leave harbor; not 
a single soldier must he transported. * * * 
I The International Federation of Trade 
Unions declares that the proletariat of all 



countries can and must act in this manner 
to protect the workers' efforts in the di- 
rection of liberty and social progress; and 
firm in the conviction that war can only 
by the will of the workers, the In- 
ternational calls upon all national trade 
union centers to prepare, if necessary, for 
mass action by means of a general strike. 

"The production of war materials must 
cease in all countries, and in order that dis- 
armament may become an accomplished 
fact, the International demands that action 
he taken in all countries to put an end to 
the manufacture of arms. * * * 

"Today our organization must of its own 
accord, within its own ranks, find the 
power to preserve the world from terror 
and annihilation." 

To this the heads of the A. F. of L. 
respond that the Amsterdam manifesto and 
the similar cablegram sent out by the Brit- 
ish Labor Party, at a time when they 
wanted to help Soviet Russia defeat 
Poland. They say that these same labor 
forces condemn the Allied starvation 
blockade against Soviet Russia, and then 
themselves "inflicted suffering on the en- 
tire population of Hungary" by a blockade. 
They deny that the world is threatened 
by terror and anarchy "unless it he from 
the Soviets." Poland, they declare, "has 
now perhaps the most democratic govern- 
ment of Europe." 

In short, the article takes direct issue, 
as to facts of current political and working- 
< las- history, with the position of the labor 
movements of Britain, France, Italy. Bel- 
gium, Scandinavia, Holland, Switzerland, 
Czecho-Slovakia and Germany and Austria. 
It ends up with this declaration: 

"It is a source of regret that conditions 
been so shaped by those wdio arc now 
controlling the policies and course of the new 
International Federation of Trade Unions, 
that the American Federation of Labor 
feels constrained to refrain from joining a 
ment where the independence and au- 
tonomy of each national trade union center 
is not only denied hut wherein it is sub- 
jected to absolute dominion for purposes 
wholly foreign to the objects for which 
the International Federation of Labor 
should be formed." 

In view of the tremendous peaceful 
revolution going forward in Italy, and the 
gigantic industrial and political strength 
which European labor is developing to 
meet the organized international reaction 
that is cloaked by the Allied conferences, 
the effect of the refusal of the American 
movement to go along any further will be 
t<> make European labor still more radical. 
For it was the big American delegation, 
voting always against every radical pro- 
posal, that encouraged the anti-radical 
element to keep up its protests against 
the Left Socialists in the International's 
ons. With America out, European 
labor hastens toward complete affiliation 
with Moscow. 

If gratitude for non-radicalism were to 
be found in the hearts of American em- 
ployers, they would cease their prepara- 
for the promised "big offensive" of 
this winter. But they are merely stupid 
and vindictive because they are compelled 

to deal with union representatives. 
They are like the political gangs that con- 
trolled the presidential nominations and 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



platform committees this year. They will 
make no compromise with the people. 

From the top rail of the fence, that looks 
like a most dangerous sort of procedure. 
After all the rank and file can stand only 
about so much of the iron heel. Then they 
go into committee of the whole, and de- 
vise ways and means of registering their 
opinions — industrial, political, diplomatic 
and labor-diplomatic. 



LABOR CONDITIONS IN RUSSIA 

(Continued from Page 7) 



15.1)00 to 20,000 rubles a month plus a substantial 
payment in kind of very good rations. One 
hundred and five people here had handled 
70,000,000 poods of peat, while at another 
works working on the normal system and 
at normal rates of pay, 283 people had 
only handled 6,000,000 poods. Another in- 
teresting experiment is at Kazan, and is being 
carried out by members of the building trade 
union who had been given 2500 acres of land 
and had undertaken to develop a community; 
they were working directly under the Supreme 
Council of National Economy. Eleven hundred 
and fifty people are employed, and the com- 
munity lias its own communal kitchen, its own 
schools and library, and creches for the young 
children. The productive department of the 
colony are a carpenter's shop, a tin-plate shop, 
an engine-shop, a flour mill, and a railway 
with an engine of its own. This community is 
undoubtedly far more favorably situated than 
the ordinary workers of Moscow or Petrograd, 
and their life cannot be compared with the 
stress and strain of the normal lot. Amongst 
other advantages, it enjoys that of being in the 
country and being able to grow its own food. 
The rations of the community were distinctly 
good- Work along these community lines ap- 
pears to be in the line of natural development 
of the Russian workers' psychology, which, in 
work, always expressed itself before the revo- 
lution in the artel. (A primitive method of 
co-operation.) Another interesting experiment 
is that of the Russian-American tool shop, 
created in Moscow by seventy men deported 
from the United States, a large number of 
whom, of course, spoke English, and who had 
had experience of American organization of 
industry. The men were working twelve hours 
a day and had a premium system by which it 
was possible for a worker to earn 100 to 200 
per cent, more than the rate. A special laundry 
and cook-house was attached to the shop, and 
all the workers, men and women, got not only 
dinner but supper. 

The communist view of the trade unions is 
expressed in the report of the interview with 
M. Schmidt already give, and in "The Trade 
Unions in Soviet Russia," by A. Losovsky 
(Moscow, April, 1920). The present defects of 
organization are recognized, particularly the im- 
possibility of carrying out completely the pro- 
posed "system of the state regulation of wages," 
but it has one very great virtue, "it is the 
child and creature of the Revolution" (p. 46). 
It is stated that "there is not a branch of state 
activity (military, food, sanitary, economic, 
technical, cultural, etc.) in which the Russian 
trade unions arc not engaged." "Revolutionary 
activity, whole-hearted loyalty to the cause of 
the Revolution, the clear and firm position in 
the struggle with the bourgeoisie, the stern and 
ruthless hostility to the very idea of the co- 
operation of classes, the fearless destruction of 
old relations and fetishes, are things which the 
Russian trade union may teach the workers of 
other countries." The critics of the present 
form of trade union point out the need for 
"independent class organization" in opposition 
to the tendency of government policy being 
framed to suit the preponderant mass of the peas- 
ants. Also, that the need of Russia for foreign 
capital, and "the adaptation of Russian private 
capital" with the "extreme growth of private 
small and home industry" creates now "numbers 
of hired workers standing in need of defense 
of their interests by the trade unions." Another 
reason for the maintenance of independent 
unions is to resist "compulsory" measures and 
"bureaucratization" by the Soviet authorities, 
and they must be able "to defend before the 
Government the interests of the proletariat, in- 
dependently of the views of the Government 
itself." The critics look to improvement in 
wages, reform of the loan system, freedom of 
election of boards of administration and works 
committees, and political reforms to secure 
greater freedom generally. 

Conclusion. 
Russia is a vast country, potentially rich, but 
economically in a backward state. Her people 
consisted, before the Revolution, of peasant 
owners (the \.ist majority) a town proletariat, 
a small bourgeoisie, and a still smaller class of 
large capitalists, sharply distinguished from the 
rest of tlie population. Russian party strife 
has been marked by its extreme violence. The 
present leaders are men who have suffered every 
kind of oppression, and have been accustomed 



months a year, are paid much higher wages 
than usual, the money wage amounting to from 
for years to take their lives in their hands. 

With such conditions and such a history, Rus- 
sia has been plunged into no less than six- 
years of continuous and still continuing warfare. 
She has been blockaded and her communications 
with the outside world cut off. She has been 
invaded by foreign troops on all sides. More 
important still, the most desperate efforts have 
been made to foster conspiracy and civil war 
on her territory. 

The economic collapse, and the measures for 
the restriction of liberty, are due at least as 
much to these causes, and the general exhaus- 
tion, suspicion, and despair which they would 
have produced in any case, as to the tumults 
and mutual hatreds to which the Revolution 
itsel.f has given rise. 

Whether, under such conditions, Russia could 
be governed in a different way — whether, in 
particular, the ordinary processes of democracy 
could be expected to work — is a question on 
which we do not feel ourselves competent to 
pronounce. All we know is that no practical 
alternative, except a virtual return to autoc- 
racy, has been suggested to us; that a "strong" 
government is the only type of government 
which Russia has yet known; that the opponents 
of the Soviet Government when they were in 
power in 1917 exercised repression against the 
Communists. 

Such are the conditions and peculiarities, the 
heated and revolutionary atmosphere, which 
must be taken into account in any criticism of 
the Russian Revolution, ami still more in any 
attempt to apply its lessons to other countries. 

The Russian Revolution has not had a fair 
chance. We cannot say whether, in normal 
conditions, this particular Socialist experiment 
would have been a success or a failure. The 
conditions have been such as would have 
rendered the task of social transformation ex- 
traordinary difficult, whoever had attempted 
it and whatever had been the means adopted. 
We cannot forget that the responsibility for 
these conditions resulting from foreign inter- 
ference rests not upon the revolutionaries of 
Russia, but upon the capitalist governments of 
other countries, including our own. 

BEN TURNER, the Labor Party, Chairman of 

Delegation. 
MARGARET BONUFIELD, A. A. PUR- 
CELL, H. SKINNER, Trades Union Congress. 
ETHEL SNOWDEN, TOM SHAW, ROBERT 

WILLIAMS, the Labor Party. 
CHARLES RODEN BUXTON, L. HADEN 
GUEST, Joint Secretaries. 

The report has been submitted to and also 
indorsed by Mr. R. C. Wallhead and Mr. Clif- 
ford Allen, who formed an independent delega- 
tion to Russia on behalf of the Independent 
Labor Part*;. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3) 

ployed children under certain ages. In 
setting this law aside the Supreme Court 
held that the act was not a regulation of 
commerce, hut an attempt to regulate con- 
ditions of manufacture and that Congress 
has not jurisdiction in matters reserved 
to the States. 

Judge Cochran accepted this decision, 
rather than that of Judge Killets and de- 
nied the injunction plea on the ground 
that while the machinists might interfere 
with production, they were not interfering 
with interstate commerce, as understood 
by the United States Supreme Court. 



Glaring Inefficiency 

Publicists who talk about strike losses 
when a group of workers demand higher 
living standards are ignoring the charge 
of Gifford Pinchot, chief forester of Penn- 
sylvania, that Pennsylvania's forests are 
denuded and that 5,000,000 acres of idle 
land costs the people $100,000,000 a year. 

In freight charges alone this lack of 
efficiency is costing Pennsylvania $25,000,- 
000 a year for lumber brought into the 
State. 

"'free cutting ",oes on without regrowth 
of trees," says the forester. "This means 
forest devastation. It means neglect of 

our true economic interests that borders 
on tin- criminal, for this condition Penn- 
sylvania is to blame— Pennsylvania in its 
capacity as a commonwealth of intelligent 
people." 



(Continued from Page 5) 



LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS* UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III 355 North Clark Street 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Secretary 

THOS. A. HANSON. Treasurer 

Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue. Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE. WIS CHAS. BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON. Agent 

74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, O S. R. DTE, Agent 

618 Front Street. Phone Bell Navarre 1823 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y J. MURPHY, Agent 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 B. DAFOE, Agent 

3308 E. 92nd Street. Phone South Chicago 7666 

SUPERIOR, Wis W. EDGEWORTH, Agent 

332 Banks Avenue 

CONNEAUT, O W. J. WILSON, Agent 

992 Day Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 71 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 48 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary 

ED HICKS, Treasurer 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

Phone 428-W 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone Broad 131 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 3308 E. 92nd Street 

Phone South Chicago 7666 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

Phone Bell, Navarre 1823 

CLEVELAND, 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 44 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 571 

TACOMA. Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash....64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1S8 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaska 

UNGA Alaska 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1S8 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 

STOCKTON, Cal F. E. MrFARLANE, Agent 

46 West Main Street 



BRITISH COLUMBIA STEWARDS' UNION 
FRED WALSH, Secretary 

VANCOUVER, B. C 311 Hastings Street, VI 

Room 2. Phone Seymour 3976 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wash , Letter List. 



At a municipal election in Fresno, 
Cal., firemen won the two-platoon 
system and policemen the eight-hour 
day by a vote of six to one. 

For the first time in its history, 

Steam Engineers' Union No. 6 has 

, . , ■., ,, •„ „.„ Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 

signed contracts with all grain ele- p ost0 fflce, letters addressed In care of 

v itnis iii Kansis Citv Mo *h e Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 

vators in ivansas Liiv, mo. j not be he]d Ionger tnan 30 day8 rrom 

A wholesale CO-Operatlve store will date of delivery. If members are unable 
. , , .i a i to call or have their mall forwarded 

be started by the organized coal iurlng that per i d, they should notify 

the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 

Andersen, O. -1339 
Anderson, J. -655 



Abolln, K. 
Andersen, B. A. 

-1410 
Andersen, J. F. 
Andersen, C. D. 

-1131 
Baskes, Jack 
Anderson, Karl A. 
Anderson, Gu» 
Anderson, K. P. 
Anderson, H. 
I Anderson. Jack 



miners of Kansas and local co- 
operative societies. 

Painters in Newark, N. J., are 
negotiating a new wage rate of $9 a 
day. The present rate is $8. New- 
York City pays $10 and the local 
painters insist that living conditions 
here justify the increase. 

Investigators of the books of the r 
Kansas State Industrial Court, which Raumgartel, A. 
enforces the Kansas "can't-strike", Barentes. m, Joe' 
law, deny that excessive telegraph Ballah, Lee ( 
and telephone charges were caused , B^rfiund. i y er 
by the attempt to get freight cars Harrington, P. 

, .1 • l ^ ' Merger, Aug. 

for farmers to move their wheat. Belmont, Joe 

One of the main reasons was secur- perf 1 *™ 1 ' BJrger 

ing Allen boosters as passengers Carlson> ' M _ 90$ 

for the special train to New York Carr, A. 

when the Governor debated the £"&""•**-" 2 SJartl. 8 



Anderson, John 
Anderson, Chris 
Anderson, G. N. B. 
Andersen, Adrian 
Andersen, B. E. 
Anderson, Hlliner 
Alonzo. N. 
Axelsen, Herman 
Axelsen, George 

Bendlxon, Hans 
Berntsen, Nils 
Bingham, Dexter 
Blomgren, Adolf 
Rllndhelm, A. E. 
Blomgren, Carl 
Boyle, Andrew 
Bretsen. Jos. 
Brown, H. 
Brown. Martin 
Braun, T. 
Bunden, L. W. 



Chekan. 
Clifford. 



W. 
H. W 



E. O. Clark. Sterling 



Chrlstensen, 
"can't-strike" law with President H. 

Gompers. r. an,els . e 'V. °i,£i 

' I Pegerstedt. Karl 

The battle of the Marne was only nevleh, Joseph 
a skirmish compared to the every- ( {£™ J. J. 
day hazard of peace, according to Edfn Guat 
members of the Health and Acci- Kngb'erg, O. L. 
dent Underwriters' Association, at Engvall J. A. 
~ . T . Felsch, Chas. 

their meeting in Chicago. It was Fernandez, Ellslo 

stated that 105,000 persons are ac-'Fex. Andrew 

.,..,.. r _ I Framnes, Ivar 

culentally killed every year. During oabrlelBen. Peder 
the war 31,000 Americans were Gaughan. Tom 
. ... • . . ... . , , Gran, Aksel 

killed in battle, whereas here at r.ravander, Nils 

home, with no battle going on, 126,- j Greighan. P. 

000 Americans died of accidents dur- ' Hansen, g. JP. - OTM H a ,"^ n ' 

ing the same period. 



Dunham, Dexter 
Duncan. T. W. 
Dunne, F. 
Dutton, Henry 

Erlkson. Elner 
Erlkson, E. -38 

Franzell, A. 
Fredrlksen, B. D. 
Ferslund. Victor 

Graham. E. 
Gragan. J. H. 
Gutlsen, J. H. 
Gustafsen. Oscar 
Qusjaaa, Oscar 



i Hansen, Nels -2072 
Hansen, Ed. 



Striking cigarmakers of Tampa, ' Hansen. EHgar 

Florida, urge the labor press and Harms, E. E. 

all trade unions and individual trade .Hansen,' Frank 

unionists to warn workers in the j onas h. a. 

cigar industry to stay away from that Johnson, Jack 

,. , • ., , , „„„ ' .Tohanson, C. 

City. l'or nearly six months 1J,000 Johnson, Clarence 

men and women have resisted at- _ ■*■• _ .. 

,,.,,. I Jacobs, Fulton 
tempts of employers and their allies Johnson, E. E. 

to destroy the cigar makers' unions 3 - oi - 0T1 • -- 



Johnson, Harry 
Kallo, K. 
Karlson, Ingvald 



Helmer, Fred 
Herlltz, Ivor 
Hlckka. E. J. 
Hasselberg. Gustaf 
Hape, Hans 
Hoopes. Bill 
Hahnqvlst, E. J. 

Johnson, Gatterd 
Johnson, Chris 
Johansen, O. 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, John S. 
Jensen, V. J. 
Jorgensen, Adrian 
Jorgensen, D. 
Jultsen, C. A. 
Keane, John 
Klsor, Adlal 



Karlson, G. A. -1180 Kelly, John 



Karlson, Louis 
Kasklnan, Alluri 
Kalllnan, Frank 
K. N., -1013 
Kempsen, M. 
Kearney, Hugh 
Kerton, Lester 
I.ampe, Fred 
Larsen. Lars 
Lambert, E. A. 
Larsen, Herman 
I^aurltsen, Ludvlg 



The employers have also announced 
that when they defeat the strikers 
they must return to work under a 
lower wage scale, which amounts to 
a wage reduction of 45 per cent. 

The city commissioners of Kansas 
City, Kans., will apologize to Gov- 
ernor Allen because organized labor 
carried a banner in its Labor Day 
parade with this inscription: "To 

hell with Allen's industrial court ' Langman, Wm 

,, . „ . , I Leason. J. A. 

law. 1 he city officials are shocked Lllquest, Rudolf 

at such absence of drawing room ' Martlnsen, Ingvald McCoy. J. L. 

, „ . Mattson, Hlldlng McKenzle, Dan 

manners by vulgar wage earners Maline, Stanley 

who object to going to jail when JJ c ^ an ' A J 1&US 

. , . I McVlcar. P. 

they refuse to accept poor working Meyer, Frank 

conditions. To date the city com- 
missioners have not apologized to 
the trade unionists because of the 
governor's attempt to re-establish 
slavery. 

The Ohio workmen's compensa- 
tion law has proved so successful 
that the actuary of the State Indus- 
trial Commission has recommended 
that a 12 per cent, dividend be de- 
clared to employers who are sub- 
scribers to the insurance fund. The 
dividend will approximate $1,350,000 
and will be distributed in the form 
"f credits to subscribers. The Ohio 
compensation law does not permit 
private insurance liability companies 
to do business in the State. Em- 
ployers may provide their own in- 
surance if they desire, but their plan 



Mlckelson, Harry 
Mlcklans, J. 
MePherson, R. 
McDonald, J. 
Nelsen, Anton 
Nelsen, H. -1460 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, N. J. 
Nellson, O. 
Oberg, J. 
Ohm, Henrlch 
Olsen, Fred A. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, E. O. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, Nick 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, K. M. 
Pettersen, Eric 



Klahn, Karl 
Xlenk. K. A. 
Koppen, O. 
Krlstensen, N., 1 
Krlstensen, K. 
Kukps, Conrad 
Kuten, Alex. 
Llndholm, A. 
Llndstrom, Geo. 
Llllnirger, Wm. 
Llnne, Theodore 
Lokken, O. K. 
T.undcren, Carl 
Lund. Erik 
Lynch. J. P. 



Miller, S. 
Monrad, Trygue 
Molurg, K. G. E. 
Monroe, N. S. 
Mosley, S. E. 
Murphy, Thos. 
Muter, James 

Nelsen, Oscar 
Newman, J. S. 
Nielsen, C. L. 
Norshelm. Ben 
Nordstrom, A. R. 
Olsen, Louis 
Olsen, O. -597 
Odella, V. 
Olsen. Kristl.in 
Olsson, K. W. -972 
Owens, James 
O'Donnell, J. 
Person, Johan 
Peel, P. 
Peterson, John E. 



must have the approval of the State schelens. C. 

Industrial Commission. As a re- Sf ,"- w - ?*• 
.._.,., | Slckman, A. 

suit the Ohio law is generally ac- SlnnU, Q. 

I Slmonsen, I. 
Blmondsen. H 



Pettersen, Kristlan Plnerd, F. H 

Petersen, BJarne Plplor.e, J 

Peterson, Oscar 

Rlchardeen, J. W. 

Richardson, E. C. 

Rod, S. 

Ruhr. Hans 

Sale, John 

Saarnl, Frank 

Salvesen, T. 

Samuelsen, H. N. 

Schurr, Harm 



Prlnz, Carl 
Runsten, Arthur 
Rylander, R. 
Rysock, M. van 



ccpted by employers. 



Smith, C. J. 
Smeland, John 
Sommerfeld. P. L. 
Sohnn, M. 
Soroos, S. 
Sobel, R. 
Sterndoch, J. 
Strand. C. 
Stuhr, H. M. 
Svenson, Thure 
Bverdrup. Walter 



Sjoberg, G. 
Slandart, M. 
Talce. John 
Tangvalt, G. J. 
Thornqulst, A. 
Unwen, Harry 
Verst, C. A. 
Ward, Fred 
Watson, L. 
Wall. W. 
s\ nete, R. E. 
Williams. L. A. 
Wilhelmsen, S. 



Syrnons, W. A. 

Thorn. Arvld 
Thor. L. 
Thorpe, J. W. 
Vilen, 1. 
Vaher, C. 
Wilhelmsen. S. 
Wilson. C. 
Wright, H. 
White, R. E. 
Tlonen, 8. 
Yorkvell, A. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, John 

(registered) 
Anderson, E. F. 

(registered) 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, Andrew 
Brandt, H. 
Berke, C. 
Barton, M. 
Brun, Mattias 
Bedford, A. 
Bradsbery, Geo. 
Carlson, Oscar 
Forsman, Niels 
Hansen, Johan G. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hanson, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Hans 



Janson, John 
Johanesen, Alf. 
Johnson, Karl 
Johannesen, Jonas 
Johanson, Emil 
Jorgensen, Jack 
Kepper, Henry 
Kinnunnen, Ant. 
Olsen, Alf 
Petersen. Hans 
Roneld, P. 
Randmets, Mike 
Risenius, Sven 
Saro, W. R. 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Toren, Gustaf 
Tourela, Erlck 
Vejvorda. Frank 
Wattel, P. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHER, FURNISHER A HATTER 

Alaska. Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pins 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 
Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Alaska Fishermen's Letter List 

Anderson, Oscar McVelar 

McDonald, J. B. 
Mikelsen, P. 
Nesbi, Frank 
Newton, A. B. 
Osterman, John 



Baklnen, John 

ih. Konrad 
Bodehl, Hans 
Carlson Gust 
De Blom, A. 
Ericson, Rob. 
Erickson, John 
Eisen, l'eter 

, J. 
Gustavson, Emil 
Hansen, Emanuel 
Hansen, Anton 
Johansen, K. C. 
Johanson, Fritz 

'in. Emil 

ilen, Ole 
Kristoftersen, H. 
Levi le, Ed. 
Larsen, Theodore 
Leonard Heber 
Lindroos, < iscar 
Lauren, William 

McNeil, Daniel Ross Mlttenmeyer, J 
Monson, Jacob sniussen, T 



Olsen, Thorn 
i llsen, John 
Ome. Tobias 
Olander, Erik 
Risse, w. M. 
Rasmusen, i 
Swanson, Oscar 
Smith, R. 
Skovba, Nils 
Shivers, Wibt 
Swanson. August 
Schultz, Walter 
Tennlson, l J eter 
w algren, Hiimer 
Registered Letters 
Oranzzi. Boraline 
Meyer, Hans 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Domlnguez. Joseph Reilly, Ralph 



Gronlund. Oscar 
Johnson, John 
Kuhlmann. Emil 
Mattson, Walter 
Melgail. Mlkel 
Person, Fritz, 

Leonard 
Ralnhard. H 



Rydelius, Rolp 
Shumko, Nick 
Smith. John 
Smith, Carl. Johan 
Svanson, Harold 
Swanson, H. -1216 
Thaysen, Arthur 
Thompson. T. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Porter" are requested to call at the 
Secretary's office for their vouchers 
for salvage services rendered to 
S. S. "Washington" on or about 
November 5, 1919. The vouchers are 
issued to the following members, 
and the respective amounts due 
thereon is as follows: 

Amudsen, R $22.50 

Mattson, Geo. J 22.50 



Any one knowing the nearest rela- 
tives of C. C. Stewart, a late member 
of the Marine Firemen's Union of 
the Atlantic, are kindly requested to 
communicate with the Secretary of 
the above organization at 70 South 
St., New York, N. Y. 3-3-20 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1(90 

MEN'S CLOTHING, SHOES, HATi 

and FURNISHING GOODS 

108-110 Main Street Seattle, Wssh. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men'* Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pols. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Seamen's Outfitters 
C. P. Salmi & Co. 

Men's Furnishings 

Shoes, Hats and Oiled Clothing 

411 EAST HERON STREET 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street • - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 
EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Members of the crew of the "West 
Katan," whose claims for salvage 
services rendered to the S. S. "Fla- 
irel" is bein^ handled by the under- 
signed: It lias just come to my at- 
tention that the Shipping Hoard have 
asked you to sign vouchers in settle- 
ment of the salvage claim. 1 was 
offered one-half-month's wages which 
was refused. It appears that they 
are endeavoring to get you men to 
settle directly. T advise that none of 
you accept this as it is grossly in- 
adequate. At least you have no right 
to accept any settlement without 
consulting me. Silas B. Axtell, At- 
torney for Seamen. Q State Street, 
New York City. 10-6-20 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 
Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts.. Aberdeen, Wash. 

1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST* 

Cigars. Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The following named members of 
the crew of the S. S. "Kenebec," 
who helped salve the schooner 
"Thomas L. Wand" on November 
19, 1919, have vouchers ready to be 
distributed at our office: 

Demetre Sakelaris, $46.80; Carl 
Puika, $56.72; fsidro Flores, $50.55; 
Janes Franco* $50.55; Daniel Rod- 
. $511.55; Rafael t'onillo, $50.55; 
Dimity Sacelarius, $50.55; Siegor 
Sorensen, $50.55. Levy & Levy, 

Lawyers, Trust Blclg., Galveston. 
Texas. 10-6-20 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT. 
CIRCULATION, ETC., REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF 
CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912. 

Of The Seamen's Journal, published weekly ;it Ban 
Francisco, Cal., for October 1, 1920. 

State of California, 
County of San Francisco — ss. 

Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State 
and county aforesaid, personally appeared S. A. 
Silver, who. having been duly sworn according to law, 
deposes and says that he is the Business Manager of 
The Seamen's Journal, and that the following Is, to 
the, best of his knowledge and belief, a true state- 
ment of the ownership, management (and if a daily 
paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publica- 
tion for the date shown In the above caption, re- 
quired by the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied In 
section 443, Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on 
the reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, 
editor, managing editor, and business managers are: 

Name of Postofflce address — 

Publisher, Sailors' Union of the Pacific, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, San Francisco, Cal. 
Managing Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Business Manager, S. A. Silver, San Francisco, Cal. 

2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses 
of individual owners, or, If a corporation, give its 
name and the names and addresses of stockholders 
owning or holding 1 per cent, or more of the total 
amount of stock. ) 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, San Francisco; not a 
corporation. Principal officers of the Sailors' Union: 
Andrew Furuseth, Secretary, San Francisco; Ed. 
Rosenberg, Assistant Secretary, San Francisco. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and 
other security holders owning or holding 1 per cent, or 
more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other 
securities are: (If there are none, so state.) 

None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the 
names of the owners, stockholders, and security holders, 
if any, contain not only the list of stockholders and 
security holders as tbey appear upon the books of the 
company but also, in cases where the stockholder or 
security holder appears upon the books of the company 
as trustee or In any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom such trustee Is 
acting, is given; also that the said two paragraphs 
contain statements embracing affiant's full knowledge 
and belief as to the circumstances and 'conditions under 
which stockholders and security holders who do not 
appear upon the books of the company as trustees, hold 
stock and securities in a capacity other than that of 
a bona flde owner; and this affiant has no reason to 
believe that any other person, association, or corpora- 
tion has any interest direct or indirect in the said 
stock, bonds, or other securities than as so stated 
by him. 

S. A. SILVER, Business Manager. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 28th day 
of September, 1920. 
(Seal) MARGUERITA S. BRUNER. 

(My commission expires Jan. 8, 1922.) 



San Pedro Letter List 



Andersen, J. -2157 
Anderson, Sven 
Anderson, C. 
Anderson, Bartines 
Andowiz, H. 
Arentsen, John 
Arnesen, Isack 
Asaksen, Asak 
Aspe, Teodor 
Arnold, Tom 
Bentley, Clifford 
Berglund, Emil J. 
Bergstrom, J. 
Bengston, Sigfried 
Brown, Irwing 
Burge, Lawrence 
Braden, W. A. 
Bye, Kristian 
Brast, Sjomans 
Bjorklund, Erick 
Benson, Chas. A. 
Bergeson, B. 
Belmont, Joe 
Boe, John 
Carr, R. W. 
Cowan. Wm. L. 
Cariera, Peter 
Craig, Thomas 
Church, C. A. 
Cage, Thomas 
Christoffersen, C. 
Cumalet, J. H. 
Castle, H. C. 
Carlson, C. 
Doty, Erwin 
Desmond, Albin 
Daw, Walter 
Daunt, C. 
Deaver, Alwin 
Dreger, Jack 
Dragich, Peter 
Davis, Orville 
Drennen, William 
Disney, Robert 
Devine, John 
England, Thomas 
Evans, Wilbert 
Eliasen, John 
Evcnsen, Alex 
Edwich, Leonard 
Engel, F. 
Eliassen, Emil 
Fottlnger, Karl A. 
Fralr, Enoch 
Feeder, George 
Franzel, A. H. 
Freitag, F. 
Fansel, H. D. 
Fa hey, M. 
Fairbrothers, Ed. 
Fish, Ralph 
Golden, Roy 
Grason, Joe 
Gunnerud, Ulrick 
Gronthal, Albert 
Greenwall, J. E. 
Gotz. Rudolph 
Gallagher, Denny 
Galke, Roy 
Gaede, W. 
Hurley. Michael 
Holland, Jonny 
Hermanson, Carl 
lMlesten G. 
Hansen. Claf 
Hogsted, Chas. 
Houston, Robert 
Hey, Ben 
Hlckey, John 
Herlin, W. 
Hogstedt, Chas. 
Haman, O. W. 
Hangman, Ed. 
Holtkamp, C. 
Ikaanes. Edward 
lsakson, J. 



-2445 



Jacobsen, Jack 
Jacobsen, Tom 
Johnsen, P. -2313 
Jensen, Marius 
Johnson, George 
Johansen, Carl 
Johnson, Waldron 
Johansen, J. -1432 
Jonaseon, Johanes 
Janofy, Axel 
Jeeden, George 
Jensen, Kristian 
Johnson, Carl E. 
Johansen, Anton 
Johansson, Gustav 
Jonson, K. A. 
Kenrich, Richard 
Kelty, Peter D. 
Kessa, Th. 
Keel, Jewel 
Knudsen, Andrew 
Kristoffersen, Hans 
Kleman, Otto 
Kepplar, C. 
Killat, Dau 
Karki, Julio 
Kluge, Frank 
Klahn, Karl 
Kemmulsen, Alf. 
Kappen, Bernt 
Krumholz, Edwin 
Lind, Gustav 
Lindstrom, John A. 
Lindholm, Charles 
Lowrey, John 
Loderson, John 
Larsen, Johan 1542 
Landborg, Chas. 
Lorgeman, Fred 
Laine, John 
Lill, Karl 
Lund, F. V. 
Lauritzen, Ole 
Levine, Carl 
Lobeles, Jose 
Lehmus, Bill 
Langeman, W. 
Lund, Alai 
Lundquist, Axel 
Lutzen, W. 
Moor, Peter 
McNeil, John 
McRay, Jack 
Mize, J. H. 
McGhee, E. J. 
Martinson, John 
Maahs, Willi 
Magnusson, John 
Moritz, W. 
Monson, Ed. 
Mato, Alex 
Murphy, Frank 
Moller, J. 
Moutcso, Joe 
Mueller, John 
Nankinen, F. 
Nelson, Ernest 
Nilsson, Edward 
Nelson, Gust 
Nelson, Charlie 
Njutrom, Uno 
Nilsen, A. 
Nelson, Ham 
Nielsen, P. F. 
Nelson, Andreas 
Nelson, Emil 
Nelson, Hans 
Ogren, V. E. 
Olofson, Oscar 
Olson, Toney 
Oleson, Chars. C. 
Olsen, Emil 
Ono, Jolias 
Petersen, August 
Petersen, Hugo 
Pastrillen, H. K. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 

^wt^^™ t^ uv «. j All work done in 

OVERCOATS Established 

to Order at Popular for 20 years our own sanitar y 

Prices workshop 

Represented by £ P£GUILLAN 




—ijvhen you marry 

The question of "when you marry is 
mostly a question of when you can 
afford to marry — not when you want 
to marry. 

When this time comes, as come 
it will — you are glad then that you 
have saved your money. 

There's just one thing to do — 
provide now for whatever the future 
holds in store for you. You'll be glad 
many times for the savings account 
you can begin now at this friendly 
bank. 

Anglo-CaliforniaTrust Co. 

COMMERCIAL-SAVINGS-TRUST 

"C^ht City Wide Bank" 

Market & Sansome Streets 

San Francisco 

THIRD 6" TWENTIETH SIXTEENTH 6" MISSION FILLMORE &• GEARY IOI MARKET ST. 



Home News 



Perry, William 
Parr, Robert M. 
Pedersen, Harold S. 
Petterson, Axel K. 
Rossdam, Ha. 
Robert, Bob 
Rohman, Pet 
Rueter, Aman 
Raaum, Harry 
Rod, Halfdam 
Rosenthal, Walter 
Robertson, E. 
Robinson, Fred 
Roberts, J. W. 
Runge, R. 
Rosamund, J. 
Roberts. Pisney 
Ruiz, Jose 
Sanders, Chas. 
Saxby, Charles 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Sunde, O. H. 



Soder, Paul 
Sandberg, A. 
Seland, Hans 
Sahlberg, Rudolf 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Steffenscn, Hans 
Seheumberg, Wm. 
Swanson, Mr. 
Scottel, Andrew 
Steen, Ivar 
Sterndock, John 
Swindells. William 
Scrivers, W. 
Sullivan. Jack 
Swanson, Erick K. 
Strom, Oscar 
Strahle, Chas. 
Stenard, Percy 
Swenson, A. -1932 
Sundgrau, Walter 
Sunnesvig, Olaf 
Skaanes, Edward 



Svendsen, Fred 

Sveortary, 

Seppel, 

Sundquist, Walter 

V. 
Schultz, W. 
Treiberg Peter 
Thai, R. 
Torsman, Niels 
Thompson, James 
Veckenstedt, Wm. 
Vitol, Alex. 
Voth, Gus 
Wilson, John 



Wrobluske, Paul 
Winkelman, Ott»> 
Wennerquist, Antoa 
Wihemson, Karl 
Woods, Claude 
Wii li, Ole 
Wrig, P. 
Werne, John 
Young, William 
S eoman. W. E. 
Zoerb. Walter 
Zimmerman, Fritz 
Zunderer, Theo. 



INFORMATION WANTED- 



Olaf Nyhagen, a native of Bergen,, 
age 36, is inquired for by hia mother, 
Mrs. Dina Nyhagea, Bergen, Norway. 

4-28-20 



It is estimated that the next cen- 
sus will show that about one-tenth 
of the people of the United States 
live in the cities of New York, Chi- 
cago and Philadelphia, while more 
than one-quarter live in 68 cities 
having a population of 100,000 or 
more. 

Lumber prices have risen out of 
proportion to increased costs of 
production and distribution, says the 
United States Forestry Service. This 
government bureau finds that "recent 
high prices of lumber, news-print, 
turpentine and other forest products 
have seriously affected many indus- 
tries and in various ways have im- 
posed formidable burdens on the 
public." 

Immigration is increasing by leaps 
and bounds and government officials 
predict that all pre-war records will 
be broken during 1920. It is stated 
that the rush is so great in New 
York that immigration officials are 
swamped. As is usual the arrivals 
are seeking the eastern industrial 
centers. Less than 25 per cent, of 
the August arrivals went far from 
the Atlantic coast. This condition 
is increasing housing perplexities in 
New York, Philadelphia and other 
east coast cities. 

Corporations are being forced to 
disgorge additional federal taxes at 
the rate of $25,000,000 a month, ac- 
cording to officials of the Internal 
Revenue bureau. This amount repre- 
sents revenue due the Government in 
the shape of excess and war profits 
taxes which the corporations failed 
to acknowledge in their original 
statements. It is fair to assume that 
officers of these corporations are 
among those who continually advise 
labor on the necessity for strict ob- 
servance of law. 

In the first test vote in the country 
on the league of nations, the Wilson 
covenant has been emphatically con- 
demned. The Republicans of New 
Hampshire have renominated Sena- 
tor George M. Moses, an "irrecon- 
ciliable," who voted consistently 
against the covenant either with or 
without reesrvations. He won by the 
remarkable majority of 12,000 in a 
total vote of 45,000 over Huntley L. 
Spaulding, a former Hoover aid, 
who advocated the league with the 
Lodge reservations. 

Wheat from last year's crop car- 
ried over into 1920 totaled 109,318,000 
bushels July 1, compared with 48,- 
561,000 bushels of the 1918 crop on 
hand the corresponding date last 
year, said am announcement by the 
Department of Agriculture. Crops 
on farms, in country mills and ele- 
vators and in points of large accumu- 
lation, all showed an increase over 
1919 totals. This year farmers held 
47,756,000 bushels, against 19,261,000 
bushels in 1919, the figure perhaps 
reflecting disturbed conditions during 
the past year. 

The high price of gasoline is re- 
flected in record-breaking dividends 
just announced by Standard oil com- 
panies. In the third quarter of this 
year cash dividends totaled $29,504,- 
575, compared with $27,273,000 in the 
second quarter and $23,354,000 in the 
corresponding quarter of 1919. The 
last disbursement is the largest ever 
made by Standard Oil companies in 
the third quarter and with the excep- 
tion of the $30,406,000 paid out in 
the second quarter of 1916, it is the 
largest ever made at any time since 
the United States Supreme Court 
".dissolved" the Standard Oil trust. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



<► * 


Domestic and Naval 


♦ * 



W. H. Gahagan, Incorporated, 

Brooklyn, N. V.. is constructing ten 
wooden floating drydock pontoons 
with a lifting capacity of 2000 tons 
eacli for the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration of the Shipping Board. 

The Miirnan Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, of Mobile, is busy launching 
barges, one of 7500 tons for the 
Mexican Oil Company, of Tampico, 
having been floated recently, and one 
of the big barges partially built dur- 
ing the war being sent down the 
ways this week. The company has 
work for the next two years in 
sight. 

The following tugs owned by the 
United States Shipping Board have 
been sold "as is" and "where is": 
"Guardsman" (wood), 357 tons gross, 
1000 horsepower, to the T. A. Scott, 
incorporated; "Condor" and "Cock- 
atoo" to the Goodwin-Gallagher Sand 
and Gravel Corporation; "Tomah" 
(wood), and "Green Bay" (wood), 
each 177 tons gros>, 450 horsep* 
to the Federal Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, Kearney, N. J. 

Attention has often been called to 
the dangers resulting from numerous 
wrecks in and about the Havre 
roads. In fact, several accidents 
already happened. The salvage 
firm of Laffitte & Cie. arc to raise 
a number of the vessels, amongst 
which are the transatlantic liner 
"I.ouisiane." the British cargo boat 
"Kelvinbrook," the Norwegian three 
masted "Silius,* 1 the oil tankers 
"Saint-Jacques" and "lies Chan 
and the mine sweeper "An Revoir." 

The Bureau of Navigation, Depart- 
ment of Commerce, reports 177 sail- 
ing, strain, gas and unrigged vi 
of 257,765 gross tons built in the 
United States and officially numl 
during the month of August, 1920. 
From other sources than construc- 
tion, 1 vessel of 6,749 gross tons was 
itted to American registry under 
the Act of September 7, 1916, and 
1 of 2,630 under the Act of August 
is, 1914, total 2 vessels of 9,379 
gross tons. 

A regular service between Panama 
(anal port-, and 1'untarenas, Costa 
Rica, has been established with the 
Costa Kican motor ship "Rosana" 
of 278 gross and 207 net tons, 
Panama Canal measurement. Sailings 
are approximately every 15 days in 
each direction. Accommodations are 
available for six first-class pa 

The "Rosana" is 112 feet long 
by 25 feet beam, is fitted with two 
75-horsepower Diesel engines and 
makes approximately nine knots. 
Puntarenas is 471 miles from Balboa. 

Announcement was made by the 
Shipping Board recently that it had 
authorized the sale to foreign pur- 
chasers and granted permission for 
the transfer thereof to foreign regis- 
try of ten steel steamers of approxi- 
mately 3700 deadweight tons each, 
constructed on the Great Lake 
the American Shipbuilding Company, 
the registry to which these vessels 
will be transferred being France, 
Norway, Sweden, Holland, Denmark, 
Belgium, Spain, Italy, Great Britain 
and its colonies and dependencies. 
These vessels, equipped to burn either 
coal or oil, were constructed by the 
rican Shipbuilding Company for 
■it, and being unable to 
interest steamship companies in this 
country in the purchase thereof ne- 
gotiated for their sale to foreign in- 
terests. The Shipping Board was 
informed that the shipbuilding com- 
pany will receive about $662,700 each 
for the vessels, which approximates 
$171 a deadweight ton. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH .Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1920 

Assets $66,840,376.95 

Deposits 63,352,269.17 

Capita] Actually raid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,488,107.78 

Kmployees' Pension Fund 330,951.36 

OFFICERS 
JOHN A. BUCK, President 
GEO. TOURNY. Viee-Pres. and Iter. A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 
l E. T. KRl'SK. Vice-President 

1 A. H. MUI.LER, Secretary 

\VM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMKL, Assistant Cashier 
G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

I C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch 

W. C. HEYER, Manager I 'ark-Presidio District Branch 
O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. II. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

I GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTKR E. N. VAN BERGEN 

1 E. T. KRUSE lire III (JOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

A. CHRISTENSON L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFKLLOW. EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys 



San Francisco Letter List j ^, er %™- 

Members whose mail is advertised in Mohr, Karl 
these columns should at once notify Mo1 
B. A. Silver, Business Manger. The 
en's Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cat., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Litters at the San Francisco Sailors' 

Union Office are advertised for three 

months only ami will be returned to the 

Post Office at the expiration of four 

is from the date of delivery. 

tard, A. M. Jacklin. Charles 
Adolfsson, John Jacobsen. E. Th. 

Almon, L. Jahnke, Paul 

ien, Carl Jakullis. John 

Andersen, O. -2099 Janson, John A. 
Andersen, Chas. Jansson, John 



Theo. 
Anderson, A. G. 

-2440 
Andersson, Edvin 
Anderson, Frank 



Jensen, Martin 
Jensen, E. -1987 
Jenson, Jens 
Jensen, Klaus 
Jespersen, M. 



Andersson, C. -2001 Jewell, Al. M 

Andersson, G. A. 

Andersson, G. S. 

Anderson, John 

Arzziro, Geo. N. 

Attaberry, Clarence 



Johanssen, Klaus 
Johansen. Eilert 
Johnston, Kihv. 
lohanson. E. -2715 
Johnson. Carl -2783 



B ^ks, H. L. 
<, Morrl» 
l;. Hugo 

Baptiste, Lawr. 

1 Saris, N. 
J Barlow, R. 
I Bendixen, Hans 

Blomgren, C. A. 
| Bloom, Pete 

Boerner, P. F. 

Botsford, R. IX 

Bourman, Jack 

I'.roshear, A. O. 

Callahan. Patrick 

n, Sverre 
Carlson, G. -778 
Carlson, Peter 
Carpenter, Harold 
Chilcott, Geo. 
Christensen, II. C. 
Clausen, Louis 
Colman, J. 
Conley, Irwin 
Cooper, C. E. 
Coulyou, Joseph 
Culman, F. 

Dahl, Otto 
1 ia 111. Oskar 
1'ahls, Ogden 
Davis. Warren 
Daunt, C. 
DeMario, Thos 
Dickensen. T. 
I'omke, Willi 
Diange, F. S. 
Drennen, W. N. 
Duarte, John 
Duis, John 
Dumas, C. 

Eaton. Lawrence 
Eisenhardt, K. 
Ellingsen, Harold 
Ellis. F. L. 
Engstrom, Ed. 
Endemann, M. 
Knnus, Plto 
Kriekson. -997 

Farevoog, C. M. 
Farrell, Bernand 
Fletcher. Jos. 
Freese, Paul 
Fredricksen, O. 
Freierbach, C. 
Fuller, Geo. E. 

y. R. B. 



Johnson. E. L. 
Johansson, Bernad 
Joiner, Jack 
Jonsson, J. H. -2951 
Jorgensen. F 
Joyce, Daniel 
Judd. Jack 
Jungstrom, William 

Kaaveland, T. 
Karlgren, -044 
Karlsson, 10. -1738 
Karlsson, Gustaf 
Kasperson, E. 
Katkin, Ed. 
Kierne. G. H. 
Klne. Conrad 
Kinnie. E. J. 
Kirby, Geo. 
Kluge. Martin 
Knudsen, Ragnval 
Kolustow, A. 
Kraal. J. 

Kristofferson. A. B. 
Kruse, Elnar 

LaMadrid. R. 
Lambert. Jos. 
Lnnge. Henry 
Langmann. Win. 
Lanphear. D. 
Larsen, Alfred 
Larsen. II. -2280 
Larsen, Slgruid 
Larsen, John -2012 
Laurence. Bruno 
Leeder. W. -2287 
Leegaard. Rasmus 
Lefter. John A. 

tonen, Hj. O. 
Leskinen. F. A. 
I.Msten. Chas. 
Liesen. W. 
Lindeberg, Ernst 
Lindgren, A, A. 
Ltnd, II. -2314 
Llndqulst, Chas. S. 
Lindroos, Fred 
Liljedal, Ludv. 
Loning, Herman 
Lundquist, Ralph A. 
Lundin. -1054 
Lundstrom. Ernst 
Lydersen. Peder 

Maalo, Rasmus 
MacLeod, Norman 
Macauley, 1 1. 
Makares. S. J. 
Mannonen, Niels 
Manzano, Luis 
Marker. Andrew 



Germenis, Socrates MarsnalI| Ira 



Graham, Ray 
Grainge, Arnold 
Cranberg, Fred 
Gregory. M. N. 
Green. Lawrence 
Gunderson, H. "T. 

Haider. Henry 
Hale. Klngsley 
liallit, Frank 
Hallowes, L. N. 
Hangers, H. -1980 
Handley, Chas. 
in, ti. F. 
Hansen. Harold 
Harbst, J. D. 
Harvey, Earl S. 
Hauptman, F. 
Hawkins. L. 

ues, L. O. 
Hessln, B. 
Higglns, P. 
Houlak. John 



Martinsen. lngvald 

Ml It os. Mario I'. 

MahafTey, Cecil 
Mattson. Hildlng 
Mattson. Victor 
iley. Geo. 
nn, Oliver 
McGregor, Donald 
McGillvray. W, 
McKenzie, Alex. 
McLean, Grant 
McEvoy. Peter 
McCallum, Chas. 
McClintic, Frost 
McCarthy, Harood 
McManus, Peter 
Maland. Helge 
Mattns, M. D. 
Mark man. Hy. 
Maynard, G. 
Mersman. A. 
Mess. W. 
Melgand, Rleard 

Hoglander, Martin Mevers. J. E. 

Hood, Alex Mitchell, David 

Midgette, Frank W. 

Ibsen, Christian Mikelsen. Bern. 

Ireland. H. Miller. R. E. 



S. 
Monsen, Charlie 
Mol. J. W. 
Moller, Fritz 
Moonan, Thomas 

n. R. B. 
Mortensen, Geo. 

Moritz. \V. 

Morris. Francis 

Moore, H. L. 

Morris. Jimmie 
Morrison. Donald 

Moulas. Nicholas 

Muller. Werner 

. Th. 

Naville, Bmil A. 
Naylor, Geo. l >. 
rles 
Nelson, Nils E. 
Nelson, C. R. 
Nesson, Ralph 
Ness, AJksel 

nil. II. -\\1\>> 

Neveau, Thomas 
New ton, A. 

i ien, Sam 
Nickolsen, -1429 

Nielsen. Johannes 
Nielsen, -1116 

Nilsson, -1176 
Nilsson, Reinhold 
Nitschke, Kail 
Niekeison, Phillip 
Nilsen, Martin L. 
Nilsson, Edward 
Nilsson, John 
Nolen, 

Nord, Clarence W. 
Nordstom, Hans 
Nordenberg, Alf. 
Nordgren, Ragnar 
North, Jesse I. 
Nuter, Alex 
Nyiiian. John A. 

Oad, John 
O'Brien, Larry 
Ogren, V. K. 
O'Leary, Patrlc 
Olausen, Christian 
Olsen, Arnold 
Olsen, -1020 

Olson. -1280 

, Th. 
Olsen, Fred 
Olsen, Magnus 
Olsen, Ole 
Olsen, Wm. J. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen, C. -1412 
Olsson, Charle 
Olson. Ed. 

n. James 
Ostlund, John 

ne, E. T. 
Osborne, James 
Ozolin, Jan 

l'age, J. N. 
Parrlsh, Arthur L. 
Paul, INii 
Pearson, Edw. 

a. W. -1535 
Peterson, Albert 
Petterson, o. A. 
I'eterson, Henry 
Peterson, O. -1595 
Phillips, Bob 
Post, Albeit 
Potter, E. R. 
Price, Arthur 
Prusch, A. 



Puttner, Fred 

Ramasse, Joe 
Ramos, Enrique 
Randmetz, Mich. 
Rasmussi n, i 'eter 
Rasmusen. Rudolpf 
Rasmussen, Aksel 
Rasmussen, Emll 
Rasmussen, Karl V. 
Raynor, Robert 

iii, Gustaf 
Router, R. A. 
Richardson, Edwin 
Riesbeck, n.i. 
Rillukka, John 
Roberts, John 

rtson, Robert 
Rohman, Paul 
Rogers, Thos. G. 

R. 
Rommel, Andrew 
Ronn, E. 
Rose, J. 
Ross, -1500 
Ross, H. E. 
Rosenberg, L. F. K. 
Roth, M. 
Rubins, Ch. 
Rupei i. I ; 
Russell. Robert 

Saharoff, John 

S.llli. Rudolf 
Sampson, C. L. 
Sampson. I 
Samuelson, E. -2888 
Sanne, Rudolf 
Sanjer, Sajer 
Saunders, Dewey A. 
Saxby, C. H. 
Scanlon, David P. 
Sehmees, Herman 
Schmidt, E. H. 
Bchneidau, Helnrich 
Schroeder, Ernst 
Schulze, John 
Selvert, Albert 

iard. Rasmus 
Sexton, Harry J. 
Sharman, E. S. 
Sidroff, Mck 
Sigrlsl, George 
Simpson, Joseph H. 
Sinnes, K. E. 
Sjogren, Fred. 
Skaar, Oskar M. 
Skeries. Hans 
Slattery, Harry 
Small, E. R. 
Smedsvlg, O. B. 
Smith, Jas 
Smith. \Y. 
Smith, John H. 
Smith, Geo. B. 
Smith, A. G. 
Solberg, Bernt P. 
Soneson, Wilhelm 
Sorensen, Jorgen H. 
Sovdsnes, O. Peter- 
sen 
Sonne. Herman 
Spence, O. L. 
Speckman, Max 
Spey, H. F. 
Stanford. Harry 
Stensland, Paul 
Sternlsa, Carl 
Stout, R. E. 
Stragseth, Svend 
Strele, F. 
Strom. C. A. 
Strurh, O. 
Stang, A. 
Stenensen, A. 
Stewart. William 



Stone. Wlcktor 
Sir.indberg, O. 
Bund. Alex. 
Sundberg, K. C. 
sen, Oskar 
Swanson. C. 
Swinka, Albert 

Tacie, John 
Taylor, Sam C. 
Tellefson Kmtl 
Thomas, Fred 
Thompson, Peder 
Tillman, Chas. 
Tlngstrom, A. R. 
Tohtz. R. C. 
Torson, Andrew 
Tovano, A. R. 
Touzel, R. 
Trebensen, Nick 
Tucker, Harold J. 
Tufty. C. J. 
Turner, W. A. 

Vargas, Martina 
Van der Loeff, 

II A. 
v d Ort. W. 
Va ii Hi Iden, H. 
Viets, C. L. 



Vlerr, W. 
Vilek, Edward 
Vltol, A. 
Vorst, C. A. 
Wahlstrom, E. 
Wallln, cast 

Walters. II 
Waterfall, L. N. 
Waterman, J. K. 
Wessberg. E. H. N. 
West, Frank 
Wheller, Geo. 
Whiting. R 
Wtgsten, Geo. 
Wik.-n, Emil 
Wiera, Hy. 
Wlklund, Wiktor 
Wilhelm. I 
Wintlor, Jo 
Wilks. J. 
Willmann, Wm. 
Wilkins, Hy. 
Wittenburg, D. 
Woods, Dick 
Wolfe. E. O. 
Wolff, Paul E. 
Yarkwelt, A. 

Son, v. C. 

Young, R. T. 



PACKAGES. 



Barlow, Robt. 
Blake, L. 
Booshard, H. 

• . J. 
Churman, W. C. 
Corneliusen, M. 
Deu Pree, E. 
Eads, Joe 
Egan. John 
Engstrom, Edw. 
Fi ey, Peter 
Ganser, Joe 
Garrlck, J. B. 
Goodman, Tony 
II ilvorsen, Isak 
Henrikson, Ernst 
Hobbs. Frank A. 

under, M. 
Holmes, Geo. 
Jansonu, C. J. W. 
Johnson, John 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
Kallio, F. 
Kalning, P. G. -1342 



n. Fred 
ii id, Rafael 
Larsen, J. -2012 
Larson, Axel 
Lehto, Oscar 
Liljedal. L. 
Llndgren, E. 
Locke, J. E. 
Mathls. Hartley H. 
Mi Pherson, R. 
Mortensen, Bjarne 
Navarrete, Joe 
Newman, L. O. 
Nordlund, Albert 
P.ittersen, Frank 
Pedersen, Anders 
Sorensen, Jos. E. 
Sternica, Carl 
Stranberg, P. 
Tillsten. Jack 
van Vleet, F. B. 
Wallln, V. O. 
Williams, J. D. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Charles Bernard Wilson, born in 
Stevenson, Alabama, write or come 
to your mother, Flora M. Wilson, 
719 18th street, Oakland Cal., care 
Mrs. J. Buck. 9-22-20 



Frank K. Sofsky is desirous of 
knowing the whereabouts of his 
brother, Carl McCormick Sofsky, 
who was last heard from while re- 
turning from France on the U. S. 
Army Transport "'America" at Nor- 
folk, Va. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts will please communi- 
cate with the above named party at 
9 N- Washington Street, Stanton, 
Va. 7-7-20 



The Centrale Bond von Trans- 
portarbeiders have placed in my 
hands claim of the father and 
mother of L. Verhoef, seaman who 
met his death on the S. S. "Balosaro" 
April 29, 1920. An old spring line 
broke, curled around Verhoef's left 
leg and yanked him on to the winch 
while he was operating it. Before 
it could be stopped his leg was taken 
off. He died two hours later at the 
hospital. Will members of the crew 
please report here promptly. The 
master has made an entry in the log 
book to the effect that the deceased 
met with his death through intoxi- 
cation, which statement we believe 
to be utterly false. I am acting for 
the dependent relatives. It is the 
duty of seamen to tell the truth. 
Your dependents may be in the same 
position some day. — S. B. Axtell. 

8-25-20 




FRANK M. NESTROY 

Phone Kearny 5361 THE ARGONAUT TAILORS UNION TAILOR 

We do Master Tailoring on Suits, Overcoats and Uni- 
forms for men who desire to dress and look superior. 
We carry the largest selection of Imported and do- 
mestic woolens. Quality and workmanship guaranteed. 
MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 
268 MARKET STREET 

Conducted by Capt. Chas. Ehlers 
Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

300 Rooms at 50 cents per day, 
$2.50 to $3.00 per week, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL, LUNDGREN. Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



— Phones — 

Office, Fkln 7756 Residence, Rand 27 

Office Hours, 9:30 a. m. to 6 p. m. and 

7 to 8 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9:30 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

Liberty Bonds accepted in exchange for 

dental work 

2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Golden Gate 

and Taylor Streets, San Francisco 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Pnone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 
Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



19 East Street, Foot of Ferry Bridge 

Wholesale— OUTFITTER— Retail 

Everything for the man that goes to sea 

SEAMEN AND FISHERMEN 

GEO. A. PRICE 



u. s. 

Sea Boots 



IS RIGHT 

Navy 
Flannels 



Tower's 
Oil Skins 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall Bros. 


Express 


Stand and Baggage Room 


— at — 




212 EAST ST., San 


Francisco 


Phone Douglas 


5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

7*8 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5 

UNIFORMS & SUITS, TO ORDER & READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 

36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



SAVE MONEY ON YOUR SHOES 

Would you walk one-half block from Market Street to 

Save $1 to $3? 

We are located at 58 Third 
St., San Francisco. 

We are agents for— 

W . L. Douglas 
Just Wright 
JValk Ease 
Strong & Garfield 

We can positively save 
you money by buying 
your SHOES from us. 

Our low rent and small 
expense make it possible 
for us to sell cheaper 
than the Market Street 
stores paying six times 
our rent. 

We are showing a most exclusive and large stock of men's 
shoes. We can fit any foot and suit any fancy. 




PRICE'S 



58 THIRD STREET 

Between Market and Mission 

San Francisco, Cal. 



UTTMARKS NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 1804) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
Nevr York, N. Y. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES* AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL In the United States and is up to date in every respect. I^or 

full information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




ill 1UI1 




JACOB PETERSEN ft SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCI1CO 



C 1V/I C\ kT E" 1? Q See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
O IV! \J IS. Hi Iv D box in which you are served. 

S^"i-vV^>C!Ti>?125 ! vfS2^3jSsiPT. iHo5S :-V!E38aSS£«_. 
Issued by Authority or the Cigat Makers International Union of America. 

Union-made Cigars. 

UUllS (ftfllittW lint UnCqinconUHWimihu box law b«o mi«1t bya llftUfiS WORM 
»WMK»or THE (XMllUCItt'lNTEItKAflOIUl UNIONS Anuria, in oruruit.c» 8r»oteri fetlit^- 
»an»»rnl of Ikt HORAi HATWIM md INllitttlUAl WUIMI Of THf CSAft Vmnim m iMMS* 



"Jwm Cigjfi lo ill smoMrnhrouonool 1 - 
' AEW'^IOMl'UOM'K'lltKl-lfbf fXIBiWd IcUfoVj) t> 1»K. 



V CM/ l/o. 



/AitMrr'di 



* 9 


News 


from Abroad 


* 


a 



The financial position of Egypt 
has been strengthened considerably 
owing to the enormous wealth 
brought to the country during the 
war from sales of cotton and Egypt 
is at the present moment considered 
as being in a better financial position 
that she has ever been before. 

Oil has been struck at a point just 
within the Arctic Circle, north of 
the Great Slave Lake and close to 
the Mackenzie River, according to a 
report from Toronto. The flow is 
small, but ten barrels a day. and 
possibly cannot be made use of eco- 
nomically. 

It is reported from Tokyo that 
Japan plans to send an unofficial 
commissioner to the United States to 
facilitate mutual understanding and 
improving the relations between Ja- 
pan and the United States by de- 
livery of public lectures and other 
appropriate means. 

A Paris report says that the 
Danish, Swedish and Norwegian Pre- 
miers decide to meet in Copenhagen 
to determine the attitude of their 
respective countries toward the 
League of Nations and to discuss 
the policy which they intend to fol- 
low toward Russia. 

A new Brazilian shipping company, 
the Companhia Nacional de Trans- 
poses Maritimes Uniao Luso-Bra- 
zileira, proposes to place orders soon 
for twelve steamships of about 2,000 
tons each and will establish a line 
between Portugal and the Portuguese 
Colonies, New York, Central Amer- 
ica, Hamburg and other European 
ports. 

The sending of an American gun- 
boat to Honduras to protect Amer- 
ican interests, if necessary, reveals 
that officials in Washington have 
been watching with growing con- 
cern revolutionary movements in 
process of development in several 
Central-American countries. Out- 
breaks are expected in Honduras 
and Guatemala. 

A Tokyo dispatch says the "Asso- 
ciation for the Study of Foreign 
Policy" in that city decided to hold 
a mass meeting and appeal to the 
public on account of the anti-Jap- 
anese agitation on the Pacific Coast 
of the United States. Members of 
the association say that the relations 
between Japan and the United States 
are growing worse over China and 
Siberia. 

Between January 1 and July 1, the 
Norwegian mercantile marine had a 
net increase of 59 vessels and about 
180.000 tons. In the same period 
the Swedish fleet increased by 9 
vessels and about 55,000 tons, while 
Denmark had a net increase of 21 
vessels and 28,000 tons. Of the Nor- 
wegian ships added to the fleet, 31 
with a tonnage of 20,411 were built 
in the country, while 33 of 99,55cS 
tons were built abroad. 

The five liners being built in Eng- 
land for the Australian Government 
will come out next year. They carry 
each 15,000 tons deadweight and 700 
third-class passengers in rooms. The 
designed speed is 15 knots. Of the 
950,000 cubic feet of cargo space, 
370,000 will be insulated. The speed 
will be 15 knots and fuel will be 
carried for 7,000 miles steaming. Six- 
more liners are being built in Aus- 
tralia, which will carry 12,800 tons 
at 13 knots. They will have each 
250,000 cubic feet of insulated space. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



■4 



One Sure Thing.— Care may kill 
people, but don't care kills more. — 
Boston Transcript. 



Sunday-School Teacher— What is 
more to be desired than great riches.' 

Chorus of Scholars — Nothin' I — 
Royal. 



The Cure. — "I am sure the fellow 
we were talking about has an itching 
palm." "Well, why doesn't he go 
out and scratch for a living'" — Balti- 
more American. 



Natural Mistake. — Raymond — 
"What the deuce do you mean by 
telling Joan that I am a fool?" 
George— "Heavens! I'm sorr> 
was it a secret?"— London Mail. 



Constant Reminder.— He (to wife 
who is off for the beach)— "Now. 
don't forget me dear." She— "As if 
I could. Jack. The surf at night 
sounds just like you snoring."— Bos- 
ton Transcript. 



Shake Before Taking.— Tommy (to 
aviator)— "What is the most de idlj 
poison known?" Aviator -"Aviation 
poison." Tommy — "How much does 
it take to kill a person?" Aviator — 
'One drop!" — Science and Invention. 



Psychological Advantage. — "Don't 
you object to all this talk about the 
high cost of everything?" "Not at 
all." replied the profiteer. "It pre- 
pares the mind of a customer for 
what he may expect and saves argu- 
ment." Washington Star. 

Deep Impressions. — "That antag- 
onist of yours says he is going to 
leave footprints in the sands ol 
time" "He won't." replied Senator 
Sorghum. "His mind is in the 
clouds. lie is an intellectual aviator. 
When he comes down he will leave a 
dent, not a footprint." — Washington 
Star. 



His Weakness. — "What brought 
you here, my poor man'" inquired 
the prison visitor. "Well, lady," re- 
plied the prisoner, "I guess my trou- 
ble started from attending too many 
weddin's." "Ah! You learned to 
drink there, or steal, perhaps?" "Xo, 
lady; I was always the bridegroom." 
— Toledo Blade. 



I CAN SAVE YOU 

$15 

ON YOUR SUIT 



My place is located on a 
side street, hence my 
expenses are practically 
nothing compared to big- 
houses on main thorough- 
fares. 



TOM WILLIAMS 

THE UNION TAILOR 

28 SACRAMENTO ST. 



You get the same class 
of Service, Woolen trim- 
mings and excellent 

Workmanship. The Style, 
Quality and Fit I guar- 
antee. 

Is the amount not worth saving 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENUY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well informed man, and In a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 
500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 
Hezzanith's, Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus, 
Dividers, Nautical Bcoks, Charts and Tide Tables. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 

1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 
We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Diamonds 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID QOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postofflce 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 





^amgsjf Sorensem 



The One Price Jewelry Store. Everything Marked In 
Plain Figures 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

Attractive Platinum or Gold Mountings with 

Exquisite Diamonds 

WEDDING RINGS 

Hand Carved In Platinum, White Gold, Green 

Gold and the Old Style Plain Gold In 12 

DIFFERENT STYLES and all sizes 

WEDDING GIFTS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

715 MARKET ST., Above Third SAN FRANCISCO 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 
Store Open: 8:30 A. M. to 6:00 P. M., Saturday Included 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want your Panama blocked 
right I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

133 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 1660 



CBftHBTEn 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ARGONAUT SHIRTS 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization 



VOL. XXXIV, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1920. 



Whole No. 1722. 



THE JAPANESE PROBLEM 



Its Menace to America as Seen From California's Standpoint 



The article that follows is reprinted 
from a recent issue of The New Republic, 
to which publication it was contributed by 
Chester H. Rowell, editor of The Fresno 
(Cal.) Republican. 

Mr. Rowell is generally regarded as 
one of the best informed men on the 
Pacific Coast on the question of Japanese 
immigration and its potential dangers to 
this country. His views on the subject 
are therefore of more than passing inter- 
est now that the Japanese menace, long- 
felt and understood in California, is be- 
ginning to attract national attention. 



Because the question of Japanese immigration 
has been agitated chiefly by California, there 
is a tendency to regard it as a local California 
question, whose importance Californians exag- 
gerate, from a too-near perspective. As to 
its local aspects, this may be conceded. The 
Californian who would risk the peace of the 
world because he is annoyed by too many 
Japanese neighbors at Florin or San Gabriel 
must not expect sympathy except from the few 
others similarly situated. And of course any 
pretense that Occidental civilization is stagger- 
ing under the burden of one or two hundred 
thousand industrious and generally law-abiding 
Japanese is too absurd to be rega r ded as any- 
thing but hysteria. If this were all, Califor- 
nians would deserve the serene condescension 
with which their appeals are too often met. 

What thoughtful Californians contend is that 
this is not all, and that in its larger aspects the 
Californian, not the provincial eastern view, pre- 
sents the truer perspective. In this we are 
joined by all the English-speaking white peoples 
bordering the Pacific — by Washington, Oregon, 
British Columbia. Australia and New Zealand. 
These peoples are only a small part of the 
white race of the world. But they are its van- 
guard and its whole representation on the 
shores of the Pacific. And they are unanimous 
in demanding the support of the American 
Union and of the British Empire in excluding 
Japanese and Chinese immigration. 

They all need immigrants, and they all reject 
those immigrants who are nearest and easiest 
to get and whose labor, if admitted, would 
produce immediate and great prosperity in their 
several commonwealths. Whatever the abstract 
merits of this race question, at least there is 
only one concrete opinion on it among the out- 
post peoples of the white man's world. 

In California the situation presents itself un- 
der various aspects, some of which are con- 
fessedly local and temporary. There are per- 
haps a hundred thousand Japanese in the State 
(no one knows the real number) mostly indus- 
trious and useful people. Some of them are 
engaged in business or professions and some 
in skilled mechanical trades, but most of them 
are farmers. As farm laborers they scatter 



everywhere, but as farm owners or renters they 
tend to concentrate in a few districts, and to 
Hawaiianizc these. As laborers and as renters 
the larger land owners welcome them. As 
land owners, nobody wants them, and as land 
renters nobody wants them for neighbors. The 
reasons are partly economic. They underlive 
and overwork their white competitors. But 
they are mostly racial. 

Right or wrong, our people will not live 
with those of a physically different race except 
on the basis of that race's inferiority. Since 
the Japanese are not inferior, and are in some 
respects superior, there is friction. Seven 
years ago California passed an alien land law. 
forbidding land ownership by "aliens ineligible 
to citizenship" (which means Japanese) and 
restricting their right to lease land to three 
years. Ingenious lawyers found ways of getting 
around these inhibitions by nutting title in the 
name of native-born minor children and naming 
their parents as guardians. So there is an 
initiative law now before the people, limiting 
guardianship over real-estate to persons eligible 
to own real property, and abolishing the leasing 
privilege entirely. The initiative will undoubt- 
edly pass, but it will have little effect. Leases 
will be changed into contracts- ostensibly for 
personal employment, and other forms of 
guardianship will be devised. Nothing will 
have happened except the impressive declaration 
of the people of California that they do not 
want the Japanese. 

So far as the Japanese now here are con- 
cerned, this is all; and it is not much. Willingly 
or unwillingly, we shall have to make a place 
for them in our industrial structure, and they 
will fill it well — too well to suit us. If this 
is all, we can stand it, and it may even be 
good for us. Certainly it is California's busi- 
ness whether we face the problem wisely and 
reap the benefits or foolishly and take the 
consequences. Either way, if the Japanese do 
not increase we can take care of those who 
are here. The only great thing is to be sure 
that there shall be no more of them. And 
over that not California, but the nation, has 
jurisdiction. On this our appeal to the nation 
at large is based. 

The possibilities of increased numbers are 
three— the birth rate; smuggling in violation of 
the "gentlemen's agreement," and a letting 
down of the immigration bars, under the plea 
that whatever laws we pass must not dis- 
criminate between races. 

Statistically, the birthrate looks startling. 
Mr. V. S. McClatchy has presented figures to 
show that in a few generations the Japanese 
will be most of the population of California. 
To which Mr. John P. Irish responds with 
computations showing that by similar geometric 
progression Mr. McClatchy's grandchildren will 
then own all the land in California. Of course 
neither will happen. But the nucleus is here, 
and it is already certain that for all time to 
come California will have a considerable popu- 
lation of Oriental race. What has happened 
to Hawaii has begun to happen to us. Even a 
slight relaxation of the immigration bars would 



finish it. The natural increase alone, in spite 
of Mr. McClatchy's startling figures, will scarce- 
ly do so. 

Under the "gentlemen's agreement," Japan 
avoids an exclusion law by undertaking to do 
the excluding from the Japanese side. Japanese 
laborers can not enter the United States with- 
out passports, and Japan undertakes to refuse 
these passports. But if a Japanese does 
smuggle in, over the Mexican border, and can 
then lose himself among his own people for a 
few years, there is no way afterwards of exclud- 
ing him. Chinese exclusion is effective, because 
if a Chinaman does slip in and is caught after- 
ward without the necessary papers, he can be 
deported. A Japanese can not. In consequence 
there is an undetermined but doubtless very 
considerable amount of organized smuggling 
over the border. If this continues and grows, 
either an exclusion act or a tightening of the 
terms of the gentlemen's agreement will become 
imperative. 

But of course the only overwhelming menace 
would come from a reversal of the national 
policy that we shall have one law for immi- 
grants of European race and another for those 
of Oriental races. To relax or compromise 
that principle would be to undermine the dyke 
that keeps out the infinite ocean. For the 
really serious aspect of this race question is 
the fact that the races which we are considering 
are so overwhelmingly numerous. There are 
nearly as many Japanese as Americans. There 
are four times as many Chinese. If the racial 
barrier is to be lowered, sooner or later we 
shall have to admit the Chinese also. Then 
there will happen to America — to California 
immediately and to the whole nation within a 
generation — what has already happened to Ha- 
waii. Our grandchildren will find out, from 
the Hawaiian laboratory, whether they dare let 
that happen. 

What their verdict will be is perhaps aca- 
demically debatable. But until the verdict is 
rendered, the frontier peoples of the white 
man's world arc unanimous that it is their 
advance-guard duty to take only one side of it. 
For this is the only human blunder which 
once made can never be undone. The world 
may go Bolshevist or Imperialistic, Buddhist or 
Atheist; it may abolish property, marriage, 
government or liberty, and afterward retrace its 
steps. But it can not mongrelize physically 
different races and ever after unmix them. 
Either they will intermarry, and destroy the 
white race (the yellow race is sale in Asia) 
or they will be kept from doing so by a caste 
system which will destroy democracy. Either 
there must be a geographic racial frontier at 
the Golden Gate, or else we shall have a 
social frontier, right down the middle of our 
institutions. It is not a question entirely of 
economics or of civilizations. Economic in- 
equalities are temporary and we have already 
assimilated civilizations quite as alien as the 
Japanese. It is a question of physical race, 
and race is hereditary. It lasts forever. 

Also it is a question of world peace. If the 
scattered embers of the European war are sue- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



cessfuHy extinguished, a world-polity is theo- 
retically and probably practically possible which 
will guard against the repetition of that calam- 
ity. Nothing can guard the peace between the 
Occident and the Orient except the develop- 
ment of friendly co-operation across the Pacific. 
It will take all the nations to establish that 
peace, but any two of them could break it. 
We must make sure that these two are not 
America and Japan. And to this end we must 
avoid causes of friction. With the two races 
physically on different sides of the ocean, we 
can develop our common national and inter- 
national interests. But with any considerable 
immigration to this side, causes of friction 
would inevitably develop. 

They might, be our fault, but we could not 
prevent them. Our people have learned their 
racial lessons in a dangerous school. We have 
dealt with two inferior darker races, but never 
with an equal one, and we have dealt always 
unjustly. We have dealt unjustly with the 
Negro and he submits. We have dealt unjustly 
with the Indian and he is dead. If we have 
many Japanese, we shall not know how- to deal 
otherwise than unjustly with them, and very 
properly they will not submit. The only real 
safetv is in separation. Nature erected a 
barrier which man will overpass only at his 
peril. 

So the message of California to the nation is 
this: On our local problems, have patience 
with us. Admonish us if we need it, but do 
it understandingly. But on the great problem 
let this nation resolve as firmly as California 
is resolved that one side of the Pacific shall 
be the white man's and the other side the 
brown man's frontier. Only so is our race, our 
civilization, or the peace of the world secure. 



PERFIDY OF THE WOBBLIES 



In the August issue of McClure's Mag- 
azine there appeared an article from the 
pen of Harold Lord Varney under the 
head, "X-raying the Red Philosophy." The 
article is an exposition of the villainous 
methods utilized by the "traveling tour- 
ists" of the I. W. W. in sowing the seeds 
of dissension in the labor unions affiliated 
with the American Federation of Labor. 
Varney, who is now writing a series of 
articles for McClure's on the I. W. W., 
was for seven years officially identified 
with the Industrial Workers of the World, 
and while working under the red banner 
of the "Wobblies" was admired by the 
crimson-hued brethren as one of the ablest 
expounders of I. W. W. philosophy. Var- 
ney traveled all over this country as a 
propagandist and was hailed by the disci- 
ples of the revolutionary aggregation as a 
Demosthenes whose oratory soared above 
the majority of the blood-and-thunder 
spouters, whose war whoops thrilled the 
thoughtless and unsophisticated. 

Varney, since he severed the ties that 
bound him to the professional disrupters 
of the legitimate labor movement, has been 
stigmatized as a Judas by the high priests 
of the "Wobs," but whether Varney de- 
serves to be designated as a traitor or not, 
the fact cannot be denied but that Varney 
is tearing away the mask from the I. W. 
W. and exposing the repulsive features of 
a gang of conspirators whose ambition has 
been prostituted to a program of destroy- 
ing the bona fide labor unions affiliated 
with the American Federation of Labor. 
Varney in his article in the August issue 
of McClure's uncovers the "borers from 
within" and shows the means and methods 
employed by the "Reds" in sowing the 
seeds which result in a crop disastrous to 
the solidarity of legitimate unionism. 

Varney, after seven years' affiliation witli 
the Industrial Workers of the World, 
boldly declares that the I. W. W. has ac- 
complished nothing save destruction, and 
having failed to reach the goal of their 
expectations through slandering and vili- 
fying the officials of the labor unions affili- 
ated with the A. F. of L., have put their 
wreckers on the inside of the labor unions, 



in the hope that they can raise questions 
of discussion that will ultimately weaken 
or destroy the efficacy of the bona fide 
labor unions. 

The I. W. W. has been a foraging ag- 
gregation almost since its birth, and hun- 
dreds of thousands of members of organ- 
ized labor can well remember the many 
blood-bespattered circular letters that have 
been sent out from the literary bureau of 
the I. W. W. pleading for financial assist- 
ance in behalf of campaigns for free speech, 
strikes and in defense of red apostles who 
were charged with mudrer, riot, incendiar- 
ism, treason and other crimes, and many 
of the members of organized labor have 
learned that thousands and tens of thou- 
sands of dollars that were donated by labor 
organizations in the belief that the money 
so contributed was to relieve distress and 
uphold the right of free speech and free 
assembly, was but a ruse to recuperate 
the depleted treasury of the I. W W. in 
order that the soap-box propagandists 
might be better equipped to carry on their 
campaign of demoralization and destruc- 
tion. 

The members of organized labor have 
likewise learned that these breeders of dis- 
sension are devoid of every feeling of grat- 
itude, and that the great majority of the 
professional disseminators of calumny, 
slander and vituperation have been actu- 
ated by no motive save to weaken and 
eventually destroy the only responsible 
and reliable movement on the industrial 
field that is honestly struggling to advance 
and promote the material welfare of toiling 
humanity. Thousands and tens of thou- 
sands of men and women in the labor 
movement have been duped and deluded 
by the glib-tongued Ciceros who have 
painted word pictures of the changed con- 
ditions that would take place on this old 
earth when the revolutionists would storm 
the citadel of Capital and force the despots 
in the domain of industry to capitulate to 
the terms of unconditional surrender. 

Men and women in the labor movement 
who were once hypnotized by the mouth- 
ings of wind artists have realized that "all 
is not gold that glitters" and that the 
radiant and glowing promises made by the 
evangelists of I. W. W.ism who dedicated 
"I'm a Bum" as an international anthem 
to revive the drooping spirits of the pro- 
letaire, were nothing more nor less than 
brazen and unblushing degenerates who 
felt no tinge of remorse as they tempora- 
rily converted the gullible to take stock in 
an organization that has now, through its 
perfidy, become a pariah among laboring 
men and women who have learned their 
lessons in the school of experience. 

The I. W. W. and the O. B. U. are 
practically one and the same, having the 
same tactics, methods and propaganda, 
and should not only be shunned by the 
men and women of labor, but openly con- 
demned as treasonable to the best inter- 
ests of the working class. — The Miners' 
Magazine. 



Reformers generally would succeed bet- 
ter if they were to give less attention to 
the effects of the strike and more to the 
causes thereof. 



CUTTING CORNERS 



"And where do you think you're going? 
Don't you know enough not to try and run 
by a stop signal? You didn't see me raise 
my hand, eh? Well, you can hear the 
whistle, can't you? If you are both blind 
and deaf you've got no business running a 
car. Trying to cut corners, that's what you 
were trying to do. Well, you can't get 
away with that st'-fT here. Back up now and 
go around when I give you the signal." 

Did the traffic cop ever talk that way to 
you? If he has not you have probably 
heard him speak his mind to others. And 
there is only one thing to do about it. That 
is to back up as he tells you and make the 
turn around the standard in the middle of 
the crossing as the rules require. If you 
don't, you may have a chance to tell your 
troubles to the judge, and judges are such 
unsympathetic listeners. 

It doesn't pay to try and cut corners 
either in an auto or in finance. Yet thou- 
sands of Americans are trying to take 
short cuts to prosperity and affluence every 
day. The traffic rules provide for saving, 
and safe investment but they try to get by 
on speculation and "taking a chance," to get 
around the congested financial corner. 
When they are caught, and they nearly 
always are, they have to back up and start 
all over, while those who stuck to the rules 
of safety buzz by them with hoots ot 
derision. 

Scores of wildcat stock salesmen will try 
to point out tremendous profits to you from 
investment in their wares, but you will have 
to cut the corners to get to those profits 
and you may wind up in a wreck or the 
police court, or at least have to listen to 
the words of the traffic cop. If you stick 
to safe and sane plan of systematic saving 
and investment in government securities, 
War Savings Stamps, Treasury Savings 
Certificates and Liberty Bonds, you'll get 
ahead faster than if you try to cut the 
corners, for you won't have to back up 
and start over. 



THE RIGHT TO LIVE 



Ultimate success in a labor struggle does 
not always depend upon the ability to con- 
tinue fighting. Not infrequently it is the 
ability to quit that decides the issue. 



Says the Columbia Record : "The right 
to strike would be less questionable if it 
did not operate to interfere with the 
right to live." 

If that is all that makes a right ques- 
tionable, then there is very little to 
justify the right of private ownership of 
land. Landowners have the legal right 
to keep the landless of the earth. The 
right to work depends entirely on the 
permission of landowners under the exist- 
ing land system. Consequently the right 
to live is dependent, so far as statute 
law can make it, upon the willingness of 
earthowners to concede it. The strike 
is a weapon to protect the worker against 
too oppressive a use of the land monopo- 
list's power. Like all weapons of war, it 
may "operate to interfere with the right 
to live," but, so long as private ownership 
of land remains undisturbed, neglect of 
its use may operate as wholesale suicide. 
If the right to live is sacred, then land 
should not be privately owned. 



A giant mushroom weighing nearly 31b. 
and measuring 24 inches in circumference 
has been gathered between a row of po- 
tatoes on a Sheffield district farm. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Martial Law in Galveston 

In a letter to the Houston (Texas) 
business men's associations, John H. Rea- 
gan, Galveston correspondent for the Hous- 
ton Press, declares that martial law in 
Galveston, because of the longshoremen's 
strike, is backed by big business ; that riots 
in Galveston have not occurred, and that 
"there was not enough criminality in the 
facts which brought them (the soldiers) 
here to equal the police blotter of Houston, 
Dallas or El Paso on one brisk police 
evening." 

The newspaper man wrote the letter in 
answer to a letter published by Galveston 
business men who attacked the Houston 
Press because of the publication of arti- 
cles by Reagan showing facts that other 
forces were concealing. 

"It isn't a question of political groups," 
says the newspaper man. "I am not caring 
a tinker's dam for these groups. There 
was and there is something finer and no- 
bler involved : a thing which we sent our 
men to Europe to die and to live for; a 
question of liberty. 

"Here are the 'causes' which brought 
the guard here : 

"1. An interurban was shot into by two 
negroes, members of the longshoremen, it 
is true, but an act of their own volition. 
Both men have been indicted and one is 
on the island and the other has escaped to 
Toledo or Detroit. 

"2. Five automobiles that brought 
strikebreakers to Galveston were stoned 
outside of the city limits by unknown par- 
ties and one driver was caught and beaten 
up. 

"3. A white strikebreaker was beaten 
up one evening in June by several long- 
shoremen and his head stuck in a water 
pail. 

"These are the crimes — the terrible of- 
fenses which causes the State of Texas to 
police Galveston to-day at a cost of $50,- 
000 a month. 

"But that is not all. You and I and 
the rest of us were told that freight had 
stopped moving; that wheat and cotton 
could not be shipped if the strike contin- 
ued. The governor spoke of this terrible 
condition in his proclamation. Yet all the 
cotton and grain that goes out of Galves- 
ton, with a small exception, does not go on 
coastwise ships, but upon deep-sea vessels 
— and it was the coastwise longshoremen 
that struck, not the deep-sea men. 

"On July 14 General Wolters took over 
the police force of Galveston and all po- 
lice power. The commissioners, elected 
by large majorities, were insulted by the 
act, and there is no city in Texas, where 
there are red-blooded business men, who 
would have stood for such usurpation of 
power or so thinly woven a pretext. 

"But that was not all. Thursday of the 
past week, John Mathias, counsel for Gen- 
eral Wolters, stood in the county court- 
room and addressed members of the bar 
of Galveston, and stated that the writ of 
habeas corpus did not operate in Galveston 
where the military were concerned. 

"I wore the American uniform to pre- 
serve the principles of American govern- 



ment. I wear the American Legion button 
as a constant reminder that three of my 
friends lie dead in France for such a cause, 
and the cruel commercialism that would 
crucify these people of Galveston because 
of a love of power rather than justice is 
a commercialism that is decadent and sod- 
den, and unworthy to survive. 

"I do not censure the boys who are in 
uniform. They are fine, splendid fellows, 
my brothers. But a few months ago I was 
one of them. 

"But when the foundation of a structure 
is bad, the house crumbles and the foun- 
dation of bringing the guard here is so ab- 
surd and ridiculous that no sane man in- 
vestigating the situation could do other 
than say, 'They should not be here.' 

"General Wolters has abolished in the 
corporation court the right to trial by jury ; 
he has abolished the right of appeal ; he 
has denied the right of public appeal ; he 
has suspended the right of habeas corpus 
and a man may be imprisoned and held 
and have no recourse. They are scarcely 
doing that in Russia ; save in a state of 
war they have not a right to do it in 
Texas." 

The newspaper man declares that be- 
hind martial law is the attempt to estab- 
lish the non-union shop and opposition to 
the city commissioners whose tax equal- 
ization policy has angered big business. 

"May I add in conclusion that since the 
1.000 longshoremen have been out on strike 
there has not been a single arrest of one 
of them for any grievous offense ; that the 
men are well behaved ; most of them are 
at work at other tasks, and are living the 
lives of good citizens." 



Stop "Help Wanted" Cry 

The Cincinnati branch of the National 
Metal Trades Association, that is opposing 
the wage demands of organized machin- 
ists, has instructed its members to discon- 
tinue "help wanted advertisements until 
further notice." 

These anti-unionists proclaim their right 
to "run their own business," but their 
union now notifies them to stop advertis- 
ing until "further notice." 

The extensive advertisements, it is stated, 
are of doubtful value because they en- 
courage the strikers and "business is de- 
clining in all lines throughout the coun- 
try." 

The antis might also state that the ma- 
chinists are winning their strike. 

In another appeal the antis ask contri- 
butions for the home guard. In his let- 
ter, President Dean says : 

"I would of course be indiscreet to put 
into a letter everything I know about con- 
ditions here, making it absolutely necessary 
to maintain the home guard, but let me 
state to you most emphatically that they 
are very plain, very direct and very nec- 
essary." 

The machinists say strikebreakers are 
garbed in the uniform of the home guard 
for the purpose of provoking violence, and 
that there has been no violence and prop- 
erty is not endangered because of the 
strike. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 
355 North Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia— 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg , Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South 
Australia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot, Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 

Internationale Transportarbeiter-Federation 
Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE 

General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-U nion, Grev 

Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan, F. 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 

Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Longgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade, IS Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Y. Strand- 
strade 20, Cobenhavn. 

HOLLAND 

Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

AUSTRIA 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

ITALY 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S. Marcellino 6-2, Italy. 

SPAIN 

Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle In- 
glaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Fcliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Fogtiistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregaods em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



♦ 


* 


World's 


Workers 


■ ■> 



The membership of the British 
National Union of Railwaymen is 
481,081, an increase of 64,550 
on the figures for last year. 

Swedish naval officers are said to 
be greatly exercised over the pro- 
ed new law which would prevent 
their employment in commercial ves- 
except after a period of train- 
ing. 

Officers of British vessels have- 
made demands lor increased over- 
time rates and flat increases in 
monthly pay as follows: Cargo 
liners and general traders First 
Mate. £10; Second -Mate. £7; Third 
Mate and ranks below, £5 per 
month in each case. Coasting cargo 
Is— Chief Mate, £2 10s.; Second 
Mate. £1 15c. per week in each case. 
Foreign-going passenger vessels- 
First Mate, increase of £12: Second 
Mate, £9; Third Mate and ranks 
below, £7; these rates to be added 
to the present rates paid, inclusive 
of all bont 

Hopeless conditions and a dark 
future for Europe's children was 
painted by Dr. Livingston Farrand, 
of the American Red Cross, on his 
return from a trip abroad. He said 
the most conservative estimate by 
the Red Cross indicates that at least 
11,000,000 children in Europe are 
fatherless from war and they face 
the next few years without hope of 
adequate care, unless outside assist- 
ance is given. "When to these or- 
phans," said Dr. Ferrand, "are added 
the millions of other children under- 
nourished and underdeveloped phy- 
sically and mentally, the dangerous 
situation is obvious. It is this gen- 
eration devitalized and neglected, 
upon which in a few years the sta- 
bility of Europe must rest." 

Under the guise of labor troubles, 
all the big German shipyards are 
closing down one after another. 
These yards are engaged on the 
struction of ships which would ha ve- 
to be surrendered to the Allies under 
the terms of the Versailles Treaty 
and the inference is that the German 
Government is encouraging the yard 
owners to adopt an unflinching atti- 
tude toward their employes in order 
to drive them away quietly to other 
trades in which their talents can be 
utilized in a way more profitable to 
the country. Whatever the real rea- 
son may be. it is a fact that the 
^mailer German yards which do re- 
pair work or build small vessels that 
do not come under the terms of the 
Treaty, seem to have no labor trou- 
bles worth speaking of. 

The 70-hour work week is common 
in Japan, according to a report to 
the British government by its com- 
mercial secretary to the British em- 
bassy at Tokyo. It is stated that 
the present tentative and imperfect 
Japanese factory laws provide for a 
12-hour day. "but factories employ- 
ing only male operatives over 15 
years of age may exceed the limit." 
The 70-hour week is common, it is 
stated, but there is agitation for the 
eight-hour day. Speaking broadly, 
inues the report, the Japanese 
laborer prefers to work long and 
leisurely, and requires little time for 
rest, food and recreation. In spite 
of great advances in cost, it is a 
fact, the report says, that Japanese 
labor is still considerably cheaper 
than labor in the west, but the com- 
parative efficiency is much lower, 
many authorities placing it at one- 
half. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Good* 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Hoot* 

See them at M BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

5291/, BEACON STREET. SAN PEDRO. CAL 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, iltuated In 
the sunny south, is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlcht has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under hit. undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



)T&5 
RKERSUN 



For Twenty Years we have Issued this I'nion Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 
Peaceful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
Disputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
vou to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
C0LLIS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE, General Setretary-Treamrer 



UNIOr^STArv 

Factory 



Union Made Shoes for Men Exclusively 

JOE WEISS 
WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

92 FOURTH ST. nr. MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Repairing Done While You Wait 
by the latest machinery. Work called for 
and delivered. 
We use only the best leather that the market affords 




IS INDEPENDENCE 
YOUR GOAL? 

INVEST YOUR SAVINGS 

in 

GOVERNMENT SAVINGS 
SECURITIES 

PRICES IN JUNE 



Thrift Stamps at Twenty-five Cents 

$ 5 Government Savings Stamps for $ 4.17 

$ 100 Treasury Savings Certificates for 83.40 

$1000 Treasury Savings Certificates for 834.00 

FOR SALE AT BANKS AND POST OFFICES 

GOVERNMENT LOAN ORGANIZATION 

SECOND FEDERAL RESERVE DISTRICT 

120 Broadway ... New York 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Rudolf Knutsson is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of h.s 
brother, J. Harvid Knutsson, a na- 
tive of Trellerborg, Sweden, age 
20, last heard from in New York, 
in April, 1918. Please address his 
brother, care Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, 59 Clay street, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 1-7-20 



ALBERT MICHELSON, Attor- 
ney-at-law; attorney for Marine 
Firemen & Watertenders' Union; 
Admiralty law a specialty. 675 Mills 
Bldg., Telephone Sutter 4673. 



INFORMATION WANTED 

Chas. T. Smith, Roy Dresser, Joe 
Ban, Autti Hanks, Thos. Wolsten- 
holme, Chas. Fraser, W- B. Pierce, 
Karl Olson, William Holmes kindly 
communicate with John T. Smith, 
Room 411, 112 Market St., San 
Francisco. 10-6-20 



SEAMEN'S FREE 
READING ROOM 

\ PLEASANT PLACE KOK AM. SEAMEN 
WHILE IN PHILADELPHIA. NO BOARDING 
OK SHIPPING. NOTHING To SELL. 

332 SOUTH FRONT ST., PHILADELPHIA. 

R. 81M0NSEM Ml. 11. I'. JldlENKV 



a <j. SWANSOn 

HstahllBhed 1904 
for the BEST there la In TAILORING 

Leu the Fancy Prices 
NOTE! S Q Swanson la not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
la Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th 8t. 
San Pedro. Lo« Am»i»» Watprfrnnt. Cai 



Navigation School 

License Guaranteed or Fee Refunded. 

Mates' Courses, $55.00 

WRITE FOR CIRCULAR 

Sextants, best makes, from $117.50; 

Octants, $72.50; Marine Night Glasses 

from $27.50— Best Makes. 

CAPTAIN PENNRICH 

36 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Near Borough Hall Sub. Station 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUp"oF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

- Try - 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAM8EN. Prop 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOES. HAT8. RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

'07 Second Street Eureka. Cal 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop 

You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
in the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It is increasingly difficult toi 
the average man to got the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
Ington and will analyse and present the 
news from tin- capita] truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other man in public life. 

Send in your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year— Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine, Madison, Wis. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Mrs. Jean Taylor. 940 Pender 
Street. West Vancouver, I'.. ('.. is 
anxious of ascertaining the where- 
abouts of Robert Gilchrist Cassar, a 
member of the Sailors' I'nion of the 
Pacific. 111-13-20 



Will some of the crew of the 
'Deva" on her first voyage Septem- 
ber, 1919, please call on II. W. Hut- 
ton, 527 Pacific Building. Oskar \Y. 
Olson was on her at that trip and 
contracted an insurable case of 
typhoid fever through bad water and 
he needs some witnesses in a case 
he has for damages. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
•if Michael Blasich, a native of 
•iume, Austria, and a retired mem- 
oer of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, will please communicate 
with his mother, Maria Blasich, 
Cncala 1fi!>. Fiiime. d'ltqlia. Ifalv. 



Will H. Peterson and G. Johnson 
formerly winchmen of S. S. "Carmel" i 
to communicate with J. T. Smith, ' 
Room 411, 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 9-8-20. I 



To Scandinavian Sailors: 

Inheritances collected Money 
forwarded to all places in Sweden, 
Norway, and Denmark to banks 
or private persons at lowest rates. 
Full guarantee. 

LEONARD GEORGES, 

General Passenger Agent Swedish- 
American Line, 268 Market St. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine 



Before resuming the trans-Pacific run the 
transport "Great Northern" will undergo repairs 
to the oil tanks. Another hatch will also be 
placed in the vessel to facilitate cargo handling. 

Grays Harbor port commission offices have 
been opened, and Engineer C. A. Strong of 
Tacoma is temporarily in charge. The first 
work of the commission will be to consider the 
purchase or construction of a dredge. 

Government gold expended in Seattle for al- 
terations and other work in Japanese-built ships 
since the first of the year will pass the $1,720,- 
000 mark when the contract for converting the 
steamship "Eastern Sword" from a coal burner 
into an oil burner is completed. 

The mine-sweeper "Swallow" and sub-chasers 
Nos- 294 and 310 have arrived at the Bremerton 
navy yard after a cruise in Alaskan waters. All 
three boats will undergo repairs. Hull work 
on the 10,000-ton repair ship "Medusa," being 
constructed at the navy yard, is 80 per cent, 
complete. 

Three new tankers for the coast oil trade 
are being built by the Union Oil Company of 
California, at a total cost of $6,100,000. Two 
of the tankers will be of 12,000 deadweight tons, 
and will cost about $2,500,000 each. The third 
will cost about $1,600,000 and will be of 7,500 
tons. The first of the trio is expected to be 
delivered late in December. 

Announcement was made last week that the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey has published a new 
edition of the following Pacific Coast charts: 
Chart No. 5971, Coquille River entrance, Ore- 
gon. This edition shows the results of a 
survey to the entrance in May, 1920, by United 
States Engineers. Chart No. 5984, Coos Bay, 
Oregon. This shows the result of a survey of 
the entrance to Coos Bay made by United 
States Engineers in June, 1920. 

The Moore shipyards in Oakland had 41,250 
tons of shipping for repair on the four drydocks 
recently. Two speed records for repair work 
were broken when the Pacific Mail liner "Vene- 
zuela" was docked to replace forward plates 
and released three days later, while the Union 
Oil tanker "Lyman Stewart" had several plates 
replaced as the result of ramming the Standard 
Oil tanker "Richmond." The Dutch steamer 
"Arakan," which went ashore off Point Reyes, 
is also undergoing extensive repairs. 

California may again be able to sell lumber 
to Brazil and other countries on the east coast 
of South America. The freight rate on lumber 
to River Plate points has been reduced _ $5 
per thousand feet, which exporters believe 
makes it possible to again do business with this 
region. The foreign trade department of the 
Chamber of Commerce was notified by the 
United States Shipping Board that the rate on 
lumber from Pacific Coast points to the River 
Plate, recently fixed at $45 per thousand, had 
been reduced to $40. 

Three steamers of the Shipping Board, under 
operation by local agents, steamed from San 
Francisco recently on their maiden voyages. 
The "Jalapa," launched on December 20 last, 
departed for Seattle to load grain for the 
United Kingdom at $26 a ton; the freighter 
"Heber," launched August 7, sailed under com- 
mand of Captain Chrestensen for Seattle, also 
to load grain for the United Kingdom; and the 
tanker "Halway," Captain Deery, with a cargo 
of oil for Balboa, got away. She was launched 
July 1. 

Contracts for lubricating oil for the Shipping 
Board vessels on the Pacific Coast for the next 
year have been awarded to the Standard Oil 
Company, it was announced in dispatches to 
the local board. The contract includes a supply 
for another year at Honolulu. The contract 
runs from October 24. According to the esti- 
mates of the Pacific Coast territory the require- 
ments for the year were based on 371,716 gal- 
lons of oil, valued at $195,808. Deliveries are 
to be made at San Diego, Los Angeles, San 
Francisco, Oakland, Tacoma, Seattle, Portland 
and Honolulu. 

Coal and oil fuel at Panama has reached such 
an acute shortage that many steamers bound 
for the Orient through the Canal and booked 
to touch at Honolulu are being diverted up the 
coast to San Francisco to secure bunkers, ac- 
cording to a report from Honolulu. The 
Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce has instructed 
its Washington representatives to take the mat- 
ter up with Federal officials. The oil fuel 
shortage at Panama has existed for several 
months past and the coal scarcity is declared 
to be a new wrinkle in the situation. Accord- 
ing to Honolulu advices, the Islands are due to 
suffer severely in commerce if the trans-Pacific 
steam ers omit Honolulu as a port of call. 

Said to be the first large steel steamer to be 
withdrawn from the Shipping Board service on 
the Pacific Coast because of the shortage of 
cargoes, the freighter "Maquan," 9400 tons, has 
been tied up on Puget Sound. She was operated 
between Seattle and the Orient by Frank Water- 
house. Other vessels, none of which has its 



home port at San Francisco, are expected to 
follow into the temporary discard. The "West- 
ward Ho" was recently withdrawn because of 
difficulties of operation. The wooden steamer 
"Brookdale," operated as a training ship in 
Matson service between Seattle, Honolulu and 
San Francisco, has been withdrawn and 
remanded to the custodian at Norfolk, Va. She 
was replaced by the "Hollywood." Her with- 
drawal is in line with the policy of retiring 
wooden steamers. 

The "Wenatchee," the first vessel of the 
twelve allocated to Pacific Coast shipping com- 
panies to be placed in commission, is expected 
to leave New York on January 15 for San Fran- 
cisco on her maiden trip. The voyage will be 
in the nature of an excursion party, calls being 
made at Havana and Panama. After calling 
in this port the vessel will proceed to Seattle. 
Rates for the first-class trip from New York 
to Seattle will be from $300 up. Captain G T. 
January, Pacific Coast navigator who served on 
ships of the Pacific Mail, has been selected to 
bring the "Wenatchee" to Seattle from New 
York. During the war Captain January was a 
Lieutenant-Commander in the Navy. He is a 
native of San Jose and is well known here. 

Super-cargoes, or agents of the Shipping 
Board who travel on vessels of the Govern- 
ment owned merchant fleet, are here to stay, 
according to advices received from Washington. 
There are 480 super-cargoes employed by the 
Shipping Board and it is said that while no 
more will be added, none will be released. It 
is pointed out in Washington advices that the 
super-cargoes are a necessary adjunct to the 
board, as they are the only direct representa- 
tives aboard the vessels. In future, their busi- 
ness will be to check all supplies purchased by 
the master of the vessel, keep a watchful eye 
on all repairs, and otherwise see that there is 
no unnecessary expense to the Government. 
"This is necessary," a Shipping Board official 
explained, "because the officers and crews of the 
steamers are employed by the operators of the 
ships, and not accountable to the shipowner." 
Super-cargoes are paid $175 a month and are 
furnished food and quarters. The fate of the 
super-cargoes has hung in the balance since the 
administration of Judge John Barton Payne, 
as chairman of the board, and many local oper- 
ators have expected orders abolishing the 
Federal agents. 

Amalgamation of the entire shipping industry 
of Japan, embracing the three great companies, 
Toyo Kisen Kaisha, Nippon Yusen Kaisha and 
Osaka Shoshen Kaisha, has been proposed, and 
conferences to this end are now in progress 
in Japan, according to Captain M. H. Morle, 
Shipping Board master, who returned from the 
Orient recently on the Pacific Mail steamer 
"Colusa." Meetings of representatives of va- 
rious shipping interests have been held at Tokyo 
and the principal seaports. Captain Morle said, 
and the newspapers have discussed the proposi- 
tion favorably. The Imperial household, which 
controls some of the companies, also is said 
to favor the move. The plan is similar to the 
merger of Japanese freighters built during the 
war emergency. "The Japanese believe that 
they will be better able to uphold their end in 
the world of commerce, if their overhead is 
reduced and if they work in unison," Captain 
Morle said. "In this way they will also be 
able to confer better with other nations to 
obtain favorable rates. They are in no position 
to operate at less than cost, and there is there- 
fore no danger of a rate war emanating from 
them." 

Old-timers along the San Francisco water- 
front were given a demonstration of real sea- 
manship when the French bark "Pierre An- 
tonine" came sailing in through the Heads 
without a pilot, or assistance from a tug. _ It 
is customary for a sailing ship in making 
this harbor, especially a foreigner, to heave to 
off the bar, and take aboard a pilot. Then 
the skipper of the craft signals for a tug, and 
is safely towed to his anchorage. Captain Hery, 
however, dispensed with these formalities, and 
although the pilot boat at the bar dispatched a 
pilot to the bark, and a Red Stack tug ap- 
peared in the offing, Captain Hery waved his 
hand in dismissal and kept on his course. 
Through the Golden Gate the bark with all 
sails drawing sped up the bay. Captain Tom 
Anderson, marine lookout at Point Lobos for 
the Marine Exchange, shook his head and 
blinked his eyes: "Dangerous, but true seaman- 
ship," he declared. Under the lee of the Marin 
County hills the bark's canvas flapped a bit. 
but another breeze quickly filled her sails and 
she came in through the midchannel and past 
Fort Point to an anchorage near Meiggs' 
Wharf. The "Pierre Antonine" came in ballast, 
197 days from Belgium to load grain for the 
United Kingdom. She came around the Horn. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



S. T. Hogevoll. Admiralty Lawyer. Seamen's 
cases a specialty. Sixth floor, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1830.— Adv. 



Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

67-69 Front Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass MILLER JENSEN, Agent 

1% Lewis Street 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JAMES C. BURNS, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WM. MILLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I ALFRED TAMKE, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga L. A. PARKS, Agent 

27 Houston Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla C. THEO. IVERSON, Agent 

12% Libertv Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C... ERNEST H. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. V. ROREN, Agent 

433 Court Street 

BALTIMORE, Md J. A. MORRIS, Agent 

1641 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa DAVID COOK, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

MOBILE, Ala J. W. ENGLAND, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

510 Trust Building 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex R. M. WILSON, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

SAVANNAH. Ga 21 West Bav Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C FRANK D. WHITE, Agent 

123 East Bay Street 
Sub Aqencles: 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEAN W. MENDELL, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla CHAS. OGRAIN, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PORTLAND, Me 5 Exchange Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 669 Eddy Street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md LAWRENCE GILL, Agent 

804 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

POPT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex HARRY BROWN. Agent 

321% Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAN LYONS, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala JAMES GRACE, Agent 

11 % St. Francis Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I C. BLARNEY, Agent 

489 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me A. ANDRADE, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH. Ga GEO. McMURDO, Agent 

523 East Bay Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla J. T. HADAWAY, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

707 South Palafox Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C J. T. ROBINSON, Agent 

49 Market Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

Headquarters: 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary. 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass F. L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

NEW BEDFORD, Mass C. E. DOUCETT, Agent 

91 North Second Street 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

H. ESKIN, Secretary 

HOROKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
D. J. GEDDES, President 

NEW HAVEN. Conn 13% Collis Str««t 

(Continued on P«x« 11) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAU 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 



— TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
< Ine year, by mail - $:?.00 | Six months - - - $1.50 
Advertising Rates ™ Application. 
Business and Editorial Office. Martiine Hall Bldf?., 
59 Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of eacb week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
■ >f postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of 
October 8, 1917. authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL., provided they are of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 13, 1920. 



SEA TRAINING 



The proper training of boys and young 
men bent on following the sea for a living 
is fully as important as that ships be 
properly built and suitably equipped for 
service. For what shall it profit us to have 
the biggest, most stanchlv built, and best 
equipped merchant fleet in the world if the 
crews manning the ships are inefficient? 

Yet it is common knowledge among old 
sailormen who have kept in touch with 
the changes wrought in seafaring methods 
in recent years, that American seamen of 
to-day are much less proficient in seaman- 
ship than the situation actually warrants. 
The fact is that the great majority of them 
have not been properly trained. Some of 
the blame for this condition may safely 
be placed on the emergency created by 
the war, when seamen had to be fabricated 
over night almost, so to speak. But after 
making all due allowance for that factor 
there still remains much to be explained. 

As the twig is bent so will the tree 
grow. Most present-day young American 
seamen are graduates of some Shipping 
Board training ship. And thereby hangs 
a tale not at all flattering to the Shipping 
Board's sea service bureau. All accounts 
agree in most particulars that the "train- 
ing" given the youngsters on board the 
average Shipping Board training ship con- 
sists chiefly of "soodjee-moodjee" drill, 
holystoning, shining brasswork, swabbing 
the decks, painting the smokestack, and 
such like prosaic stunts. No doubt these 
things are, in a way, a necessary part of 
a ship's routine work. But after all they 
are merely incidentals in the program of 
teaching seamanship, and should never be 
made to take the place of elementary in- 
struction in the essentials of the profes- 
sion. To train boys for the sea on any 
other basis is to reverse every accepted 
of teaching, and amounts at best to 
a waste of time ; especially in the case of 
the Government's training ships where the 
period of instruction is of such limited 
duration. 

That we haven't exaggerated the situa- 
tion is indicated by the following affidavit. 



kindly sent us by Comrade Julius Nelson, 
agent of the Newport News branch of the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Association, who 
furthermore informs us that the "Newton" 
is no worse than any other Shipping Board 
training ship. "They are all the same," 
he says ; "the boys don't learn any sea- 
manship, but are put to other kinds of 
work." 

AFFIDAVIT 
In regard to conditions on U. S. S. B. New- 
ton on voyage from Newport News, Va., to 
Boston, Mass., Portland and Boothbay. Maine. 
We were employed at Sea Service Bureau, 133 
24th Street. Newport News, Va., Sept. 2, '20, 
sent on board same day and got under way for 
Boston, Sunday, 5th. Friction from the start in 
regard to working hours. Watches set and men 
required to work on Sunday at other work than 
required, washing down all done. On objecting, 
chief officer told bosun to work the men 9 hours 
each day. Arriving at Roston. watches were 
broken, and when leaving Boston no sea 
watches were set. After working the apprentices 
all day, we were called to work at night. We 
objected, as we were told there was no overtime 
allowed. Chief Officer said we would get the 
time back. We never did. The watches were 
set again at Portland and on the run to Booth- 
bay, same old thing, watches called out any time, 
Left Boothbay for Newport News, same old 
argument about Sunday work. Arrived Newport 
News, Saturday, 18. Liberty party carried ashore 
by 8-12 watch a. m. No liberty in evening, 
8-12 watch called to get up. Motor boat and 
life boat at 5:30 p. m. Argument. All hands 
called to do the work. This was on Sunday, in 
port. On Monday morning, 6:30 a. m., all hands 
called to clean up ship. Two bosun mates left 
ship and mate refused to allow pay for the 
night and morning. Pay ended on 19th. We 
objected, but no good. There is no system 
aboard the Newton. We were hired as bosun's 
mates, as instructors for the apprentices in 
duties pertaining to seamanship. The only 
things any of the apprentices did was to swab 
down decks, paint around ship and wash paint- 
work with salt water and salt water soap. Never 
a lesson at the wheel, ship carried regular quar- 
termaster. Two of apprentices were used as 
lookouts, and never changed. The same two 
always. There is no regard paid to rules that 
govern Seamen's Union and there are very few 
Union men employed. The apprentices have no 
chance at all. No lessons in seamanship what- 
ever. We, the undersigned Bosun's Mates, are 
competent American seamen, A. B. Tickets, Life 
Boat Certificates, a sea service of 20 and 8 years, 
respectively, proving our fitness against the in- 
competence of those whom we were forced to 
obey, and by whom we were defrauded of 
money properly due us. To this we swear. 

JOHN CLARK FOUNTAINE. 

A. F. THOMAS. 
Sworn to before me in my City of Newport 
News, Virginia, this 21st day of September, 
1920. 

W. R. HASKINS, Notary Public. 

When all is said, the only way to make 
a real seaman of a boy is to send him to 
sea on a real seagoing ship, where he will 
be in constant contact with all the actuali- 
ties of seafaring needed to complete his 
professional education. That's how all 
worth-while seamen have been produced. 
On the other hand, a training ship course 
of instruction is liable to become a handi- 
cap to the recipient, in that usually most 
of what he has learned must be unlearned 
before he can hope to make any headway 
in his chosen profession. It was the 
recognition of this fact which led to the 
present agitation within the ranks of the 
International Seamen's Union for the 
establishment of schools of their own, 
where members who have graduated from 
a Government training ship may learn 
what's what in seamanship as distin- 
guished from what ain't. 



BIG SLUMP IN O. B. U STOCK 



The Government's fleet of wooden ships 
were built at an estimated average cost 
of $170 a deadweight ton. Three attempts 
have been made to sell the ships to Amer- 
ican buyers. Only four offers to buy have 
been received by the Shipping Board so 
far, the highest at about $12 a ton. 
Which is about the value of those miscel- 
laneous articles that used to be advertised 
as "given away with a pound of tea." 



The course of the One Big Union of 
Canada has apparently not run as smooth 
as its organizers had hoped. This is made 
plain by a few facts which leaked out 
from their recent convention held at Fort 
William. 

For instance, instead of the reputed 
membership of 41,500, the report of the 
convention shows that during the five 
months from January to May last the 

0. B. U. was receiving per capita tax on 
a membership of but 19,510. 

It was also shown that in many cases 
no per capita tax has been paid since June 

1. Coming down to particulars, the miners 
of Alberta have paid no per capita tax to 
the organization since March last, though 
they paid tax during January, February 
and March on the basis of an average 
membership of 2199. Vancouver, once the 
stronghold of the O. B. U, has paid no 
per capita tax since January, though at 
that time it was paying on a basis of 790 
members. 

Calgary is reported as having been con- 
sistent in its affiliation, with a membership 
of the general workers of 51. transporta- 
tion workers 200, and flour mill men 33. 
Edmonton has paid on an average of 486, 
but has paid nothing since May. The 
metal miners' district board of Rossland 
paid on an average of 440 members. Win- 
nipeg has paid up to June for all organiza- 
tions, with an average membership of 
3864: Fort William with an average of 
411; Port Arthur 570; Thunder Bay 744; 
Victoria 29 ; Montreal 262, and the log- 
gers 9382. 

The most discouraging item of infor- 
mation brought out is that the financial 
statement presented at the convention 
showed a balance on hand of but 
$162.25. Add to this the continued fall- 
ing off in the income from per capita 
taxes, and it is very evident that the O. 
B. U. of Canada has a hard winter staring 
it in the face. 

As if these troubles were not enough, 
the lumber workers of British Columbia, 
with a membership of more than 9,000, 
withdrew from the convention because of 
serious differences with . the executive 
board. It is stated that the withdrawal 
was the climax to a disagreement of sev- 
eral months' standing, and that it was in 
the nature of a protest against insistent 
efforts of the central executive of the O. 
B. U. to abolish the industrial unity of 
the lumber workers and bring them more 
under the control of the central executive, 
with consequent control of their funds. 

Summing it all up, the One Big Union 
of Canada seems to be well on the way 
towards the fate which sooner or later 
overtakes every labor organization which 
fails to make good its promises to the 
workers. 



LABOR'S NON-PARTISAN CAM PAIGN 



Labor's non-partisan political activity 
cannot be estimated by victories alone. 
The defeat of numerous reactionaries is 
not the sole gain. Of major importance 
is the agitation, the education, the mold- 
ing of public opinion that makes possible 
the election of candidates pledged to the 
cause of justice, followed by remedial 
legislation. 

Nothing can withstand the white-heat 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



glare of an aroused and intelligent public 
opinion. It is the foundation of all prog- 
ress in govednment. It is lasting when 
based on the thought that a particular 
wrong affects society as a whole. 

When workers first urged free public 
schools, the plan was ridiculed, but con- 
stant agitation convinced the people that 
ignorance is a menace. Then free schools 
became a fact. Labor's agitation against 
child labor, for the secret ballot in public 
elections, for a shorter work day, or for a 
living wage, did not succeed until people 
caught the point that society would be 
benefited if the changes were made. Agi- 
tation made new viewpoints possible. 

This public opinion has no connection 
with hysteria and fads of the moment that 
are based on emotion and sentiment and 
not on reality and facts. No public official 
dares ignore real public opinion. It 
sweeps aside opposition to its dictates. 
It silences a venal press and every other 
defender of special interests. 

This public opinion cannot be had for 
the asking. A single resolution is not suf- 
ficient to start its resistless sweep. Few 
men abandon long-held views, or stir 
themselves to act against social injustice 
by reading one protest. Special privilege 
does not yield because of one declaration. 

Public opinion is a golden prize. It is 
only for those who capture it by ceaseless 
work, either by deadening the conscience 
of men, or by constant agitation which 
finally awakens that conscience. 

The non-partisan political program of 
organized labor offers wide fields for this 
agitation. The story of labor's social pro- 
gram should be told on every political 
rostrum, should be the text in every 
assemblage of citizens from now until 
the November elections. The story of 
labor's ideals, its purposes and its plans, 
is the story of American ideals, of free- 
dom, equality and right relations between 
men. 

Labor has won many victories in the 
presen* non-nartisan compaign. It has 
defeated reactionaries and elected cham- 
pions of right. It has awakened labor to 
its duties as citizens. It has impressed 
upon workers the value of scrutinizing 
the record of every public official, that 
government "of, by and for the people" 
may be a fact. The list of these victories 
will be increased as the campaign pro- 
gresses. But beyond these, labor has 
Avon greater victories by arousing the 
public mind to the importance of issues 
that were formerly looked upon as "labor 
questions" that had no relation to society 
as a whole. 



CONVENTION CALL. 



International Seamen's Union of America. 



In less than forty years San Francisco 
will be the principal port in America, and 
the Pacific Coast the center of the world's 
shipping, predicts Captain Robert Dollar. 
The doughty old captain evidently must 
have got over his one-time fear that the 
Seamen's Act would put our merchant 
marine everlastingly on the blink. 



The people of India speak about 150 
different languages, and are divided into 
forty-three distinct nationalities. This ex- 
plains a great many things about India's 
troubles. If the situation in America 
were only half as bad our country could 
never have become the great self-govern- 
ing republic it is today. 



To all District Unions of the International 

Seamen's Union of America. 
Greetings: 

The International Seamen's Union of America 
will hold its Twenty-fourth Annual Convention 
in the city of Philadelphia (Pa.), beginning the 
second Monday in January, 1921, at 10 a. m. 
and will continue in session from day to day 
until its business is completed. 

The importance of this convention demands 
that each District Union be represented by its 
most able, experienced and faithful members 
in order that the questions confronting the 
seamen may be dealt with and acted upon to 
the best interest of the Seamen's movement. 

As the membership of the International Sea- 
men's Union is now over the 100,000 mark and 
as each District Union is in very good condi- 
tion financially, it is expected that a full quota 
of delegates will be sent from each District 
Union. Those who have already elected dele- 
gates are requested to consider the matter 
while those who have not selected their rep- 
resentatives are urged to bring this about. 

The Unions of the Atlantic District will 
make all arrangements for said Convention and 
be prepared to meet the delegates and tender 
them every accommodation necessary in a func- 
tion of this nature. 

Representation. 

The following sections of the Constitution of 
the International Seamen's Union of America 
govern representation at the Convention: 

Article III, Section 2. Representation at the 
Convention, shall be based upon the average 
per capita tax paid during the year. Organiza- 
tions shall be entitled to one delegate for two 
hundred members or more, three delegates for 
five hundred or more and one delegate for each 
additional five hundred or majority fraction 
thereof. 

Section 3. Affiliated Unions shall be entitled 
to one vote for each one hundred members 
or majority fraction thereof. When more than 
one delegate represents an organization, the 
vote of their union shall be equally divided 
among such delegates. 

Section 4. Delegates shall have the same 
qualifications as the elected officers of the 
organization, provided, no one shall be seated 
as a delegate who is also a member in any 
Labor Organization not affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America, etc. 
Credentials. 

Duplicates of credentials should be mailed 
not later than December 1, 1920, to the Inter- 
national office in order that the Committee on 
Audit and Credentials, which meets prior to the 
Convention, may have ample time to complete 
its work and be ready to submit its report 
when the Convention convenes. 

It is suggested that District Unions or dele- 
gates having matters they desire to submit to 
the Convention will do so by forwarding 
copies of resolutions which they desire to intro- 
duce to the International's Secretary-Treasurer 
at least two weeks in advance of the Con- 
vention. 

You are respectfully requested to take up the 
matters herein mentioned with your Union in 
order that the Convention Call may receive 
careful consideration by the largest number of 
members possible. 

With best wishes, I remain, 

Fraternally yours, 

T. A. HANSON, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 



The Board of Harbor Commissioners an- 
nounces that, effective November 1, the charge 
for switching on the Belt line Railroad will be 
$3.50 per car, instead of $3, the present rate. 

Struthers & Dixon have been assigned the 
steamer "West Carmago" by the Shipping 
Board. The vessel has just been completed by 
the Schaw-Batcher Company at its local yards. 

The November number of the Toyo Kisen 
Kaisha magazine, Japan, is one of the most 
attractive issues turned out by the company in 
several months. The articles of travel are 
illustrated and contain valuable information on 
how to see the Orient. 

The American schooner "Commodore" will 
carry lumber to Durban from British Columbia 
for $42 for Hind, Rolph & Co. The American 
steamer "Forest King" will carry lumber from 
Puget Sound to Callao for W. R. Grace & 
Co. at the rate of $30. 

Announcement of a three weeks' service be- 
tween Philadelphia and Portland and other 
Pacific Coast ports was made by the North 
Pacific and Western Steamship Company. The 
Admiral Line is the agent for the company on 
this coast and is now operating a monthly 
service between the Atlantic and Pacific ports. 

A resolution requesting National and Coast 
port authorities to urge the Government to com- 
pile and publish tonnage figures as well as 
valuations in Department of Commerce reports 
has been filed by the Seattle Port Commission. 
The resolution states that the publishing of 
value does not give the real index to the condi- 
tion of commerce, while the tonnage figures 
would show exactly the volume of traffic han- 
dled by each district. 



OFFICIAL 



SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 11, 1920. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Andrew Furuseth presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping medium; members ashore 
plentiful. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 
Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 

NOTICE TO MEMBERS 



Members at San Francisco must not ship 
themselves to join vessels at Agencies. Those 
that do will be required to conform to Shipping 
Rules of Agencies. 

This rule adopted at regular meeting, San 
Francisco, Cal., August 30, 1920. 

ED. ROSENBERG, 

Secretary, p. t. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 4, 1920. 
Shipping very dull; prospects uncertain. 

,„ „ , R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 

153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 4, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

„„,„ H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 

2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 4, 1920. 
Shipping dull. 

OAC - R B - GILL - A, ? ent - 

84 Seneca Street. P.O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 4, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 4, 1920. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88 y 2 Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 4, 1920. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^4 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 27, 1920. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

n JOSEPH FALTUS, Agent. 

P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 



Headquarters. San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 7, 1920. 
Shipping slack. Nominated officers for the 
ensuing year and delegates to the I. S. U. of A. 
Convention to be held at Philadelphia, January 
10, 1921. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary 
No. 42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 30, 1920. 
Prospects uncertain. A number of members 
around. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room No. 203 P O 
Box 214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 30, 1920. 
Shipping very good. Few members ashore. 

JOSEPH MACK, Agent. 
No. 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 54 Phone 
Sunset 547-W. 



DIED 

Julius Wang, No. 899, a native of Norway, 
age 40. Died at San Mateo, Calif., October 4 
1920. 



The coast-to-coast trade still holds the center 
of interest. Offerings from the Atlantic are 
strong, and while the east-bound market is not 
exceptional, full cargoes are moving. European 
trade also holds steady. New Zealand offerings 
are slack, and Australia is only a little better. 
The west coast of South America is dull. The 
Hawaiian trade, consistent with the season, is 
slack. There is no demand for barley charters, 
and the chartering for wheat out of the more 
northern ports has practically closed. Lumber 
is still active, and oil fixtures are being made 
for all the routes. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ON THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Contributed by the Atlantic and Gulf Seamen's Unions 



JACK AND HIS FRIENDS (?) 

In the current issue of The National 
.Marine Magazine appears an article bj 
Felix Riesenberg extolling the monumental 
activities of the Seamen's Church Institute 
of New York and elsewhere in saving sail- 
ors from Satan, from the crimps and from 
themselves. 

The article in question being highly 
gratifying in quality to the holy Joes and 
devil-dodgers, and their powerful patrons 
among the ship-owning fraternity, is pro- 
fusely illustrated with photographs taken 
within and without the "Tower of Babel" 
on South street. New York City. 

The illustrations are, of course, intended 
to show the world what a delightful abid- 
ing place has been provided by the good- 
ness <if heart and spare conscience money 
of the wealthy and class-inclined exploit- 
ers of all labor for the benefit of those 
ungrateful and unr'egenerate beasts — the 
seafarers. 

The National .Marine being one of the 
recently endowed monitors appointed by 
the reactionary Marine League to suppress 
the truth and praise the devil, naturally 
grabs Mr. Riesenberg's pleasing descrip- 
tion and pretty pictures off a hot griddle 
anil proceeds at once to accord them all 
the publicity and print display known to 
modern artcraft. 

In his opening discussion of former 
maritime conditions. Mr. Riesenberg re- 
veals himself as a waterfront tenderfoot, 
a recent arrival, with neither personal 
knowledge nor actual experience among 
such conditions. He also strikes us as 
being somewhat guileless and sanctimoni- 
ously inclined, and therefore easily de- 
luded into writing glowing tributes to the 
glamorous present as compared with the 
dark and dismal eras of the past, without 
knowing the source, and sole contributor 
t<> present day improvements, amelioration 
and industrial and economic advancement 
among seafaring men — The Seamen's 
I 'nions. 

Like most other civilians unacquainted 
with the historical facts of the situation, 
Mr. Riesenberg naturally assumes that 
present conditions are so because the 
devil-dodgers at the institutes and asylums 
have made them so. They are never made 
to realize that the so-called Seamen's 
Friends i ? ) Societies almost moved heaven 
and earth for a hundred years in their ef- 
forts to preserve and perpetuate the de- 
grading conditions preceding the great re- 
form movement inaugurated and com- 
pleted by the outraged and plundered sea- 
men themselves, for their own glory and 
renown, because they well realized that 
wherever or whenever the seamen became 
independent, prudent, sober and respect- 
able they would cease to be the special 
wards and favorite sinners of the holy 
societies, and since the aforesaid so- 
cieties were founded upon a religious de- 
sire to curb and ameliorate evil conditions 
they could only flourish amid such con- 
ditions. Therefore, instead of contending 
for tin- seamen's advancement, they always 
either secretly aided, openly abetted or ju- 
dicious! \ connived with the crimps for 



their moral and social degradation and 
economic undoing. 

"Not so many years ago, in the days 
we read of," says Mr. Riesenberg, "the 
vast enterprise of shipping, laying the 
foundation of many an American fortune, 
llourished side by side with the sinister 
business of robbing sailors of their share 
in the profits of the sea. 

"When old-timers think of the Various, 
'houses' in those days, up and down Front 
and Water streets." continues our well 
read informant, "they wonder how the old 
boarding masters would have felt if wages 
then were half as good as now. Then." 
he reminds us, "sailormen out of the Port 
of New York signed on voyage after voy- 
age for eighteen dollars a month. . . . 
Now the pay is a hundred a month in sail 
and eighty-five in steam." 

Yes! Yes! All quite true and praise- 
worthy! Now, then! Hip-hip-hip — but 
vast shouting! Pipe down there a minute 
and find out first who we're cheering for, 
the sky pilots or the sea dogs? 

We would remind Mr. Riesenberg that 
the first duty of an author is to become an 
authority; and to do that he should study 
both side- of his subject before attempting 
to submit either side for public edifica- 
tion. 

It is quite true that in former years "the 
vast enterprise of shipping laid the foun- 
dation of many an American fortune." 
P>ut it is equally true and less flattering 
that it established and maintained at the 
same time the most corrupt, treacherous 
and debasing system of human impress 
ment and involuntary servitude that ever 
disgraced mankind, and that the so-called 
Seamen's friends (? ! Societies were al- 
ways either active or silent partners to 
that corruption, and that none of them 
ever raised hand or voice, or spent a cop- 
per for its overthrow. That eighteen dol- 
lars per month was the regular wages ol 
seamen during that period is a serious 
misstatement. 

Eighteen dollars per month at the Porl 
of Xew York was an exceptionally high 
rate of wages, only to be declared when 
<hore industries were so brisk that the 
crimps and jackals could not succeed in 
rounding up enough unfortunate beach- 
combers, immigrants or other stragglers 
to (ill out the ships' complements under 
false pretexts, promises, drunkenness or 
force. 

Under ordinary conditions sailois signed 
on in the deep-water windjammers for fif- 
teen or sixteen dollars per month, and 
under certain exceptional conditions, which 
we shall presently describe, the wages at 
times fell as low as twelve, and one year 
to seven dollars per month for long voy- 
ages. 

Rut it mattered little to a sailor in those 
days whether his wages were fourteen 01 
forty dollars per month, his first two or 
three months' wages were signed away to 
a boarding master or a sailors' home (?) 
when he sold himself, the balance went to 
the slop chest, and he would be either 

nt of the ship penniless or pa-id 
off with the jib downhanl in a foreign port. 



Now, under present improved condi- 
tions it may be somewhat enlightening to 
explain how far the Kingdom Come so- 
cieties were responsible for the existence 
of the former "blood money" regime, and 
consider how much they have accom- 
plished toward reform. 

When, about fourteen /ears ago, one 
of the Seamen's (?) CI arch Institute So- 
cieties began a bumming campaign to col- 
lect a million dollars- -more or less — with 
which to erect a new and modern orphan 
asylum on West street. Xew York, for the 
benefit of seafaring men, protests came 
from seamen in all parts of the country. 
Hundreds of sailors dropped their historic 
marlinspikes and grasped their fountain 
pens to write in and voice their solemn 
protests against this crowning disgrace. 
These protests, many of which found their 
way into the press, elicited some surprise 
among civilians at the time and a good 
deal of uneasiness among the sky pilots 
who conducted the bumming operations. 

When the announcement came that the 
late Mrs. Russell Sage had decided to con- 
tribute SI 50,000 to "this worthy charity," 
the wrath of the misrepresented seamen 
knew no bounds. 

(hi March 24, 1907, two hundred sailors, 
in regular meeting assembled at the old 
Union Hall. 51 South street, Xew York, 
unanimously adopted stirring resolutions 
bitterly assailing all "friend" societies and 
denouncing the existing propaganda to 
make seamen the puppets of a monu- 
mental fraud. 

But the professional bummers kept on 
in spite of all protests, and finally suc- 
ceeded in securing enough conscience 
money to erect a colossal non-union roost 
for the benefit and convenience of their 
patrons and promoters, the British steam- 
ship companies. 

In some of the nicely worded begging 
circulars distributed among their purse- 
proud patrons at that time, the American 
Seamen's Friends (?) Society tearfully al- 
luded to the old "Sailors' Home" at 190 
Cherry street as "a feature of our city life 
for more than fifty years." Yes. it was a 
feature, a fraud, and a most reprehensible 
one, as we shall presently see. W orig- 
inally designed, it was. no doubt, the bona 
fide intention of its founders and promo- 
ters to conduct the old Sailors' Home as 
a counteracting influence against the 
crimping system. Rut hell is paved with 
good intentions, 'tis said, and the Amer- 
ican Seamen's Friends (?) Society, soon 
finding that it could not fight the organ- 
ized and intrenched crimping system with- 
out incurring the ill will and antagonism 
of their powerful allies ami supporters, the 
shipowners, prudently desisted from their 
noble attitude and adopted the course oi 
least resistance. 

Eventually the "Home"(?) was leased 
to a member of the crimping association 
and became the main pillar of this nefari- 
ous business. \ number of prominent 
shipowners were elected to the board of 
directors and the Society then announced 
that the "Home" had been "leased under 
Christian influences" for the protection of 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



seamen. God save us from our protec- 
tors! For thereafter the Sailors' Home (?) 
at 190 Cherry street remained part and 
parcel of the corrupt and vicious crimping 
system until the day of its doom. The 
Seamen's Friends Society had tried to 
wash its hands of the institution by palm- 
ing it off on the ever-greedy crimps, but 
the filth still clung and the stench of their 
treachery was never dispelled. Old sail- 
ors have long memories and they never 
forget the odious incidents of departed 
days. 

As a member of the crimping system the 
.Sailors' Home (?) at once adopted and al- 
ways persisted in crimping methods in its 
dealings with seamen. Its practices were, 
if possible, even more reprehensible than 
those of the rest because conceived and 
executed under the cloak of religion. 

In 1884 all advances of seamen's wages 
were absolutely abolished by Act of Con- 
gress. This Act fell like a bombshell 
amongst the waterfront brigands, and they 
spent two years conceiving and contriving 
underhand and unlawful methods designed 
to circumvent and nullify its provisions to 
the great distress and degradation of all 
seamen. But when all these fraudulent 
innovations had failed to bring about the 
desired results — then the opulent and sup- 
posedly religious superintendent of the 
Sailors' Home (?) placed himself at the 
head of a gang of well dressed and well 
primed beach pirates and proceeding to 
Washington, induced the members of Con- 
gress to substitute an allotment for the 
ancient advance system in the name of 
the holier-than-thou group which he rep- 
resented. And for thirty-one years there- 
after the allotment system remained in 
vogue, until finally abolished by the La- 
Follette Act; a false and flimsy pretense, 
a bane to our merchant marine and sea- 
men and an everlasting disgrace to the 
American Seamen's Friends (?) Society. 

The reverend secretary long ago admit- 
ted that all these indictments against the 
Society, as well as many more with which 
we have yet to deal, were all perfectly 
true, but he begged us not to publish 
them, as, he said, "It would interrupt our 
income and the Society is now trying to 
be good." 

"When the devil was sick, 

The devil a saint would be ; 
When the devil got well 
The devil a saint was he." 

Among all the jackals employed by the 
crimping association to debauch seamen. 
the runner of the Sailors' Home was the 
boldest and most insolent purveyor of con- 
traband whiskey. 

Mr. Riesenberg, in his article, alludes to 
ships anchoring off the Statue of Liberty. 
"Shore boats would put out from the Lat- 
tery," he says, "carrying the crimps," 
bringing whiskey, etc. 

Here again his imagination is at fault. 
Inward-bound windjammers never got as 
far as the Statue of Liberty before the 
crimps boarded them, and their boats 
never "put out from the Battery." 

The crimps always maintained a look- 
out station at Stapleton, Staten Island, 
from whence the sea and lower harbor 
were constantly scanned with spy glasses 
for inward-bound ships. All ships arriv- 
ing from foreign ports were, of course, re- 
quired to anchor at the Quarantine Sta- 



tion off Staten Island, and as soon as the 
medical inspection had been completed 
and the doctors' launch had shoved off 
the crimping boats would surround the 
ship and the runners would come scram- 
bling aboard like bramleykites around a 
dead coolie, with bottles of rotgut whiskey 
protruding from each pocket. As soon as 
the crew was drunk enough they would be 
individually assigned to whatever houses 
they had been persuaded by the various 
runners to patronize. When the runners 
had completed their canvass of the ship's 
crew they would return to their crow's 
nest on Staten Island and telegraph the 
results of their enterprises to New York. 
Then the town runners from the various 
crimping dens would meet the ship when 
she reached her berth and each would 
claim the victims mentioned by his fellow 
pirate at Quarantine. 

If, by this time the crew was too drunk 
to dock the ship, the runners would take 
her lines on the pier and help make her 
fast and the skipper would pay them a 
fancy price and deduct it from the sea- 
men's wages. The crimps would then 
load their drunken victims into express 
wagons with their dunnage and cart them 
"home." 

Such was the usual modus operandi in 
such cases. The captains always permit- 
ted it, the shipowners encouraged it and 
the devil-dodgers sanctioned it. 

On March 15, 1891, we arrived at Quar- 
antine, 176 days out from Hiogo, Japan. 
The usual bunch of runners boarded us, ol 
course, all modestly proffering pint flasks ; 
but at length came Tommy Walker, the 
redoubtable runner of the staid and pious 
old Sailors' "Home," bringing a Standard 
Oil drum of standard size with a wire 
becket rove through two ear holes drilled 
in the to]), full of Cherry street booze. 

He slammed his trophy down on the 
forecastle floor with an ostentatious flour- 
ish, loudly proclaiming that no man could 
have a drink out of that can unless he was 
going to the Sailors' "Home" to board. 

In 1893 the New York crimps sent a 
representative to England and negotiated 
contracts with many of the largest and 
wealthiest shipping firms in the United 
Kingdom for the shipment of their crews 
in the Port of New York. According to 
the terms of these nefarious contracts, the 
New York Crimping Association under- 
took to supply crews for all the signatory 
firms, excepting officers and apprentices, 
at a rate of wages not exceeding $15 per 
month, and to pay a rebate to the owners 
of $5 for every man so engaged. Immedi- 
ately after this hellish deal had been con- 
summated the advance in British ships sail- 
ing from New York was raised from $40 
to $50 per month. Wages were fixed at 
a flat rate of $15 per month and shipping 
fees were raised from $10 to $15 per man. 

Between the 15th of October, 1893, and 
the 15th of March, 1894, the first six 
months of a three-year contract, 70 sail 
of British ships entered New York har- 
bor, all chartered to load case oil for the 
Far East, and all under contract to the 
New York crimps for the engagement of 
their crews. 

Allowing 18 seamen as an average crew 
of each ship, which would be a reasonable 
estimate, we have a total of 1260 seamen. 
At $50 advance they were compelled to 



pay $63,000 in "blood money." At $15 
each, they paid $18,900 in shipping fees, 
contrary to United States law. And of 
this sum the unprincipled British ship- 
owners received $6,300 in "blood money" 
rebates. And as a member of the Crimp- 
ing Association the Sailors' Home at 190 
Cherry street was an active party to 
these base contracts, and during the three 
years they remained in force supplied hun- 
dreds of unfortunate victims to fulfill their 
hideous terms. 

In 1894 the existence of these contracts 
was discovered by the agent of the Atlan- 
tic Coast Seamen's Union at New York. 
The names and titles of 28 of the signatory 
firms in Great Britain were learned and 
verified to a certainty, and these were sent 
to Mr. Eugene T. Chamberlain, who then 
was and, we believe still, remains, U. S. 
Commissioner of Navigation at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

The following year the Commissioner 
referred to these abominable contracts in 
his annual report to the Secretary of the 
Treasury, so for the first time the matter 
was made public. Then when the con- 
tracts expired in 1896 the British ship 
mongers, finding that the cat was out of 
the bag, refused to renew them, although 
solicited by the New York crimps to do 
so. But by that time fully 10,000 hope- 
less victims must have been shanghaied 
under these villainous agreements; the ma- 
jority of them never returned and many 
were lost at sea. 

In December, 1894, this writer accompa- 
nied President Andrew Furuseth, of the 
International Seamen's Union of America, 
to the headquarters of the American Sea- 
men's Friends (?) Society in an effort to 
secure the endorsement of the Society to 
the Seamen's Bills (the Maguire Bills) 
then pending in Congress. These bills 
provided, among other proposed reforms, 
for protection of seamen from brutal offi- 
cers, for the protection of their health by 
providing sanitary forecastles and a scale 
of provisions equal in kind and quality 
to that served to convicts in the peniten- 
tiaries, for the abolition of the degrading 
crimping system, for seaworthy ships ami 
the freedom of contract to labor and per- 
sonal liberty vouchsafed all men under the 
Constitution of the United States. 

The Reverend Secretary received us 
very coldly, fingered the bills very gin- 
gerly, as though they had been infected, 
pursed his lips wisely and at length an- 
nounced that he would lay the matter be- 
fore the next meeting of the board of di- 
rectors. 

About two weeks later we received a 
report from the Reverend Secretary in- 
forming us that the board of directors had 
decided at their last sitting that, while 
the Society was "deeply interested in the 
moral and spiritual welfare of seamen, it 
could not enter into any controversy be- 
tween them and their employers." 

When we came to examine the list of 
directors of the Society we discovered 
that an unduly large proportion of them 
were prominent shipowners and mer- 
chants. 

What's the use to sue the devil when 
the court is held in hell? 

In addressing the Committee on Cities 
of the State Legislature at Albany, in 
May, 1X04, one of the most notorii 
(Continued on Page 11) 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER 

(By Laurence Todd) 



If the workers in the industries and the 
stockholders in those industries cannot 
both be satisfied from the profits, then the 
workers are entitled to the first full share, 
because the stockholders can always go 
to work. 

This is the argument of Father John A. 
Ryan, D. D., director of the Social Action 
department of the National Catholic Wel- 
fare Council, here, in a pamphlet on "Cap- 
ital and Labor," which the Council has just 
issued. He takes the position that the 
purpose of industry is the production of 
a livelihood for those in the industry. 
They must have a standard of living that 
means steady improvement and self-re- 
spect. Private profits must be a later con- 
sideration. Greater production is to the 
benefit of both worker and capitalist, but 
between worker and capitalist there is no 
common interest when the product is dis- 
tributed. ' 

"As regards the division of the product," 
he declares, "the interests of capital and 
labor are mutually opposed. While labor 
participation in management and profit- 
sharing would considerably soften the con- 
flict over the division of the product, it 
would not and could not soften the prob- 
lem." 

Dr. Ryan lays down the principle that 
all the people have the right of access to 
the earth's resources of livelihood under 
reasonable terms and conditions; that all 
have a right to a decent livelihood from 
work; that some have a right to more than 
a decent livelihood, because of higher use- 
fulness ; that stockholders have a right, 
after decent wages have been paid, to the 
prevailing rate of interest. But — 

"The stockholders have other means of 
livelihood than their interest-income ; they 
have their opportunity to work. 

"If the workers are compelled to accept 
less than living wages in order that the 
stockholders may obtain the normal rate 
of interest, the elementary needs of the 
workers — their need of food, clothing and 
shelter— will be accounted less important 
than the desires of the stockholders to 
enjoy life's luxuries and superfluities. 

"Therefore, justice requires that the 
owner of capital should not receive inter- 
est until all the workers have obtained 
remuneration equivalent to a decent live- 
lihood." 

This suggestion is very timely, since the 
country is being flooded with editorials 
and newspaper articles and special plead- 
ings of all sorts, to the effect that "wages 
must come down, along with prices." 
There is a terrible anxiety lest profits of 
stockholders may come down. 

Government officials here who keep track 
of foreign business conditions say that 
that's the point of this labor revolution in 
Italy — the stockholders were hogging the 
profits and starving the workers. The 
workers demanded that they be given a 
chance to see how the- industries were run, 
and what were the profits, and who got 
the profits, and for what service. The busi- 
ness magnates were afraid to open their 
books. So the workers walked into the 
shops and grabbed the books and the ma- 
chinery too. 

They found, as they had suspected, that 



a lot of ornamenal "directors" were getting 
$5,000 a year or so, just to attend an occa- 
sional meeting of the board, when they 
knew nothing of the industry and were 
merely social patrons or friends of the 
stockholders. The stockholders charged 
these fat salaries up to "management." 
Then there were rake-offs for other social 
butterflies, politicians, military strutters, 
etc., under the pretense of business com- 
missions, or wholesale agents, or any of 
the various frauds whereby the workers in 
an industry are cheated of the decent live- 
lihood which Father Ryan declares is the 
right of labor first of all. 

What has come of the Italian industrial 
revolution, thus far, is the putting of trade 
union committeemen on the boards of all 
industrial concerns, and trade union expert 
accountants in the offices, so that the labor 
power of Italy shall within a few months 
have a complete organization of brains in 
the actual management of all Italian busi- 
ness, and shall be able to cut out all of 
the side-graft which has been starving the 
workers and their families. Then, within 
a few months or a year at most, they arc 
going to put their own men into the tech- 
nical end of every business — experts in the 
processes of manufacture and handling of 
goods — so that they will be able to bring 
about more efficient production. 

All of these committeemen of labor will 
then form a national organization which 
will plan out the further development and 
improvement of Italian industry as a whole, 
for the betterment of the Italian people as 
a whole. Of course, they will carry out 
Dr. Ryan's principle, that the first thing 
to be secured is a decent living for the 
workers themselves — and their standard of 
living will be steadily raised. 

The keynote of the Italian industrial 
revolution is its peaceful, common-sense, 
bread-and-butter directness toward the goal 
of better production and fairer distribution 
of manufactured goods. "Even a college 
professor can understand it," as the West- 
ern phrase runs. 

Reason for the peaceful acceptance of 
the new industrial state in Italy is given 
by a bureau chief, who says that the Ital- 
ian labor movement includes a majority of 
the citizens, and that the present royal 
government holds office merely by consent 
of the workers, who may decide on a new 
government at any time. 

It is in the light of the Italian events, 
and in view of the unanimous action of 
European labor against any further at- 
tacks upon Russia, that the resolutions 
adopted by a great majority in the con- 
vention of the International Association 
of Machinists at Rochester this week must 
be read. 

These resolutions declare that the recent 
world war failed to establish the hoped-for 
democracy in the world ; that instead a 
debt which will burden the shoulders of 
the working class for many generations has 
been fastened upon them ; that the masters 
of industry have, through this war debt, 
been enabled to further enslave the work- 
ers through control of the cost of living, 
and that henceforth labor will be granted 
less and less of what it produces, if the 
master class has its way. 

"The wars of the world," the resolutions 
say, "will never stop until those who are 
called upon to do the fighting and pay the 
debts take it into their own hands to estab- 



lish peace on earth and the true brother- 
hood of man. 

"The working people of Russia have es- 
tablished a new order of society respond- 
ing to the needs of the times. The Rus- 
sian Soviet Government has shown by 
word and deed that it is not waging war 
for the purpose of conquest ; that it has 
committed no aggression upon any nation's 
territory ; has attempted no conquest of 
other peoples, and has resorted to arms 
merely to defend itself against unjust at- 
tacks from the outside as well as the re 
actionary forces within." 

They proceed to denounce the blockade 
and military measures of the American 
Government against Russia as illegal, and 
to call upon the Government to cease this 
hostility and to "leave the people of Rus- 
sia in possession of their rights as human 
beings." Sympathy for the Russian Soviet 
Government is then formally expressed. 
The Machinists' international officers arc 
instructed to "communicate with the labor 
officials of other countries" in which the 
governments might by agreement with the 
American Government seek to force the 
workers to take up arms against Russia, 
in order to "let the workers themselves 
decide whether there is cause for war or 
not." They call upon the officials of the 
A. F. of L. to do the same. 

Beside this, the convention cabled to the 
British labor movement a message of con- 
gratulation on its sending to the British 
Government an ultimatum against any fur- 
ther war. 

Expulsion of O. B. U. agents from the 
convention was the result of general agree- 
ment, especially among the Plumb Plan 
League workers, that the Machinists have 
never been in so strong a position to "de- 
liver the goods" to the workers, and that 
any disruptive agitation to-day is treason 
to the working class. The tremendous 
ovation given Glenn Plumb tells the story 
of the spirit of these delegates of 300,000 
organized craftsmen. 

Collapse of the "bomb plot" charges 
made by most of the newspapers and press 
associations of the country when the ex- 
plosion took place in Wall Street on Sep- 
tember 16 has been accompanied by no 
apologies on the part either of Attorney- 
General Palmer or his detectives or by 
the anti-labor press which tried to insin- 
uate a connection between the explosion 
and Palmer's refusal of labor's demand 
that he release political prisoners. John 
Donlin, president of the Building Trades 
department of the A. F. of L., hit the nail 
on the head when he declared, promptly, 
that the blast would be found to have been 
an accident, due to a collision with a dyna- 
mite wagon which was on the street in 
violation of law. 

Secretary of State Colby, formerly for a 
brief time on the Shipping Board, is an- 
other official who has not apologized. His 
grievance against the Labor Press Asso- 
ciation whose reporters he has just ex- 
cluded from the confidential interviews at 
the State Department, is that it has printed 
some parts of his class-propaganda, and 
that it has complained when he tried to 
color the news about Poland, Haiti and 
| other countries so as to cover up the im- 
perialist and aristocratic tendencies of his 
game. 

Your correspondent, who had the honor 
to "have it out" in open verbal combat 






THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



with Colby and to be given the door in 
consequence, has never published all of 
the "inside stuff" that was conveyed to 
the newspaper men at these secret con- 
ferences. He has never, for example, men- 
tioned a bitter attack on the shipyard 
workers as profiteers and hold-ups; nor an 
unfriendly comment on a great religious 
organization that is doing splendid service 
to the organized labor movement; nor 
sneers at the cause of the Irish race. 

Anyone who approaches the State De- 
partment, under Colby's regime, with a 
cause that appeals to working people and 
to lovers of human justice, will discover 
the reason why Colby does not want to 
be questioned by the representatives of 
the workers' press. 



ATLANTIC COAST AND GULF 

(Continued from Page 9) 



crimps in New York said in his opening 
remarks, made in our presence : 

"Mr. Chairman, and Gentlemen, I rep- 
resent the Sailors' Landlords Association, 
the Shipowners' Association and The 
American Seamen's Friends Society of the 
Port of New York." 

If that crimp had never told the truth 
before, he told it then, for he represented 
the forces that had sent him and was au- 
thorized to speak for them all. 

But as we shall have a great deal more 
to say on this interesting subject in fu- 
ture issues of the Journal, we must draw 
the line for the present, having already 
exceeded our allotted space. But we 
would gently admonish all magazine 
writers wishing to become famous by 
writing fancy sea tales to learn their sub- 
ject at first-hand before they begin. All 
so-called Seamen's Societies and Institutes 
are cloistered business ventures pure and 
simple. Under the cloak of religion they 
can solicit capital without hindrance, ex- 
ploit seamen without reproof and erect 
lordly skyscrapers without taxation. 

They have never done anything to im- 
prove the seaman's conditions, to raise his 
wages or protect his person, nor can they 
prove that they have ever saved a soul. 

They are now reaping golden harvests 
where they have never even planted a 
mustard seed. 

They are creating paper maces and dis- 
couraging good seamanship ; they are at- 
tracting droves of foreigners to the Mer- 
chant Marine and displacing hundreds of 
Americans. 

Honest American seamen will never sub- 
mit to being made the objects of public 
philanthropy and charity drives. 

We do not believe in the religion they 
preach and never practice. If we cannot 
get to heaven with the religion we learned 
at mother's knee, then we'll have to be- 
come albatrosses and forever fly 'round 
Cape Horn. 

James H. Williams. 



Special Notice 
The following named seamen, or any of 
them who were on board a steamship in 
collision in New York Harbor on March 
17, 1919, are requested by The City of 
New York to report or communicate with 
Mr. Anthony Johnson, Room 1540 Munici- 
pal Building, New York City : 



Edward Christiansen, Seamen's certifi- 
cate No. 33286. 

Gustave Faulk, Seamen's certificate No. 
66081. 

John Spavas, Seamen's certificate No. 
68016. 

N. Hansen, Seamen's certificate No. 
63983. 

James H. Williams. 



A REMEDY THAT WILL CURE 



The New York Legislature could have 
stopped rent profiteering by changing the 
tax laws. It could have put upon land 
values, aside from the value of improve- 
ments, the entire cost of running the 
government. It could have abolished all 
taxes save upon land values and made 
the tax high enough to absorb the entire 
rental value of land. That would have 
made the holding of land unprofitable ex- 
cept for use. Consequently all land hav- 
ing any value would by this time have 
been put to its best use. Consequently 
there would have been enough new build- 
ings erected to make competition be- 
tween houseowners sharp enough to 
force rents down. But to have done that 
would have interfered indirectly with pri- 
vate ownership of land. The Legislature 
did not want to do this. It preferred to 
give the rent-gouger a longer lease of 
predatory opportunities. It has done so. 



THE ORIGIN OF "DIXIE" 



A monograph in the London Financial 
Times on the history of the old Citizens' 
Bank of Louisiana, at New Orleans, re- 
veals the origin of the name "Dixie 
Land" — the term applied now to all the 
Southern states and preserved in the fam- 
ous Southern war song, "Dixie." Prior 
to the Civil War the Citizens' Bank, hav- 
ing the power to issue paper notes, issued 
several millions of bills in denominations 
of $10 and $20, but mostly $10. The $10 
bills were engraved in French with the 
French word "Dix" featured on their 
backs. The bills became known as 
"Dixies," and this money becoming popu- 
lar, Louisiana was referred to as the "Land 
of Dixies," or "Dixie Land." Eventually 
the term was so broadened as to apply to 
all the Southern states. This seems a 
very acceptable explanation of the origin 
of the term, which has been the subject 
of so much discussion. — Cleveland Press. 



"This great country, which we are 
pleased to call ours, belongs, by legal title, 
to a few landlords whose number and 
proportion to the whole people are an- 
nually growing less." — James G. Maguire. 



"When there is a great demand for 
labor in agriculture, and wages are high, 
there must soon be a great demand for 
labor, and high wages in all occupations." 
— Henry George. 



The dendrograph is an instrument that 
has been invented for recording growth 
and other variations in the dimensions of 
trees. 



"We propose to abolish poverty by the 
sovereign remedy of doing to others as 
we would have others do unto us; by giv- 
ing to all their just rights." — Henry George. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5) 



LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III 355 North Clark Street 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Secretary 

THOS. A. HANSON. Treasurer 

Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLPVAN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue. Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE. WIS CHAS. BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON, Agent 

74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, O s. R. DYE. Agent 

618 Front Street. Phone Bell Navarre 1823 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y J. MURPHY, Agent 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 B. DAFOE, Agent 

3308 E. 92nd Street. Phone South Chicago 7666 

SUPERIOR. Wis W. EDGEWORTH, Agent 

332 Banks Avenue 

CONNEAUT, O W. J. WILSON, Agent 

992 Day Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 71 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 48 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary 

ED HICKS, Treasurer 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

Phone 428-W 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone Broad 131 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

Phone South Chicago 7666 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

Phone Bell, Navarre 1823 

CLEVELAND, 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 44 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 571 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN. Wash _ P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore : 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash ...64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 43 

ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN. Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaska 

UNGA Alaaka 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1S8 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAD, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 

STOCKTON, Cal F. E. McFARLANE, Agent 

46 West Main Street 



BRITISH COLUMBIA STEWARDS' UNION 
FRED WALSH, Secretary 

VANCOUVER, B. C 311 Hastings Street, West 

Room 2. Phone Seymour 3976 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



More than 8,000 coal miners have 
won their strike against the contract 
system maintained by the Pennsyl- 
vania Coal Company. 

During the first six months of the 
present year the International Mold- 
ers' Union of North America paid 
$163,498.20 to its members in sick 
benefits. 

The 5 and 10 per cent, wage offer 
made by pottery works' owners has 
been accepted by a referendum vote 
of the National Brotherhood of 
Operative Potters. 

Bricklayers in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 
employed by the Leonard Construc- 
tion Company have suspended work 
to enforce a rate of $1.25 an hour. 
Former rates were $1.10. 

The membership of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Bookbind- 
ers is nearing the 25,000 mark. The 
last report placed the figure at 
24.496. 

President Wilson approved the 
majority report of the anthracite 
coal commission, increasing the 
wages of contract miners 20 per cent, 
over present rates. 

The last report of the Brotherhood 
of Painters and Decorators shows a 
membership gain of 3432 in one 
month. The good standing mem- 
bership was 123,436 and is still going 
up. 

Associated silk manufacturers in 
Paterson, N. J., have qualified for 
vaudeville. They appropriated $3,000 
to conduct an agitation for the non- 
union shop, which, they declare, "is 
in no way hurtful to the legitimate 
activities of trade unions." The 
Losses aver non-union employes must 
not lose their independence. 

The interests behind Governor 
Allen's "can't-strike" law are whisper- 
ing that Kansas needs a few troops 
of State constabulary to "protect the 
farmers from thieves." Trade union- 
ists are alert to this siren song 
which has been sung in eastern leg- 
islative halls by corporation lobby- 
ists during the past several years. 

The eleventh quarterly report of 
the Bloomington (111.) Co-operative 
Society shows that all records have 
been broken and a 9 per cent, divi- 
dend declared. Five per cent, of 
this amount is returned to members, 
proportioned on the basis of money 
spent at the store. This system of 
returned savings is known as the 
Rochdale plan. 

In the financial column of a Phila- 
delphia newspaper it is stated that 
the Federal Government of Brazil is 
considering plans for the issuance of 
$50,000,000 in bonds to be used for 
the erecton of homes for working 
people in Rio de Janeiro to relieve 
the housing shortage. The homes 
are to be sold on payments spread 
over a period of twenty years, with 
very low interest charges. 

In a letter to A. F. of L. head- 
quarters, Thomas A. French, secre- 
tary of the Arizona State Federation 
of Labor, makes this report on 
labor's non-partisan activity in the 
primaries of that State: "The results 
thus far have proven that the non- 
partisan program is a success, and 
had we not adopted this method we 
would have lost all offices* in Ari- 
zona. Among the State candidates 
nominated who are favorable to la- 
bor are the following: Supreme 
Court Judge, Secretary of State, At- 
torney-General, State Treasurer. 
State Mine Inspector. State Auditor, 
Corporation Commissioner and Con- 
gressman." 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
Jurlng that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 

Andersen, O. -1SS9 



Abolln, K. 
Andersen, E. A 

-1410 
Andersen, J. F. 
Andersen, C. D. 

-1131 
Baskes, Jack 



Anderson, J. -555 

Anderson, John 

Anderson, Chris 

Anderson, G. N. B. 

Andersen, Adrian 

Andersen, B. E. 



Anderson, Karl A. Anderson, Hllmer 
Anderson, Gm Alonzo, N. 



Anderson, K. P. 
Anderson, H. 
Anderson. Jack 

Back, Soren 
Baumgartel, A. 
Backstrom, C. 
Barentes, Joe 
Ballah, Lee 
Berg. H. J. 
Berglund, Ivor 
Barrlngton, P. 
Berger, Aug. 
Belmont, Joe 
Bergkvlst, Axel 
Bergesen, Blrger 

Carlson, M. -906 
Carr, A. 

Campbell, John P.. 
Chrlstensen, E. O. 

H. 
Danlelsen, O. E. 
Degerstedt, Karl 
Devlch. Joseph 
Donovan, J. J. 
Donnelly, R. A. 

Edln, Gust 
Engberg, O. L. 
Engvall, J. A. 
Felsch, Chas. 
Fernandez. Ellslo 
Fex. Andrew 
Framnes. Ivar 
Gabrlelsen, Peder 
Gaughan. Tom 
Gran, Aksel 
Gravander, Nils 
Grelghan, P. 

Hansen, 8. P. -2794 
Hansen, Nels -2072 
Hansen, Ed. 
Hansen, Edgar 
Hansen, Oscar 
Harms, E. E. 
Haltnes, M. 
Hansen, Frank 



Axelsen, Herman 
Axelsen, George 



Bendlxon, Hans 
Berntsen, Nils 
Bingham, Dexter 
Blomgren, Adolf 
Blindhelm, A. E. 
Blomgren, Carl 
Boyle, Andrew 
Bretsen, Jos. 
Brown, H. 
Brown, Martin 
Braun, T. 
Bunden, L. W. 

Chekan, W. 
Clifford. H. W. 
Clair. A. 
Clark. Sterling 

Dunham, Dexter 
Duncan, T. W. 
Dunne, F. 
Dutton, Henry 

Erlkson, Einer 
Erlkson. E. -S8 

Franzell, A. 
Fredrlksen, B. D. 
Ferslund, Victor 

Graham, E. 
Gragan, J. H. 
Gutlsen, J. H. 
Gustafsen, Oscar 
Gusjaas, Oscar 

Hansen, Immanuel 
Helmer, Fred 
Herlltz, Ivor 
Hlekka, E. J. 
Hasselberg, Gustaf 
Hape, Hans 
Hoopes, Fill 
Hahnqvlst, E. J. 



Jonas, H. A. 
Johnson, Jack 
.lohanson, C. 
Johnson. Clarence 

A. 
Jacobs, Fulton 
Johnson, E. E. 
Johnson, J. 
Johnson, Harry 
Kallo, K. 
Karlson, Ingvald 
Karlson. G. A. -1190 
Karlson, Louis 
Kasklnan, Allurl 
Kallinan, Frank 
K. N, -1018 
Kempsen, M. 
Kearney, Hugh 
Kerton, Lester 
I.ampe, Fred 
Larsen, Lars 
Lambert, E. A. 
Larsen. Herman 
Laurltsen, Ludvlg 
Langman, Wm. 
Leason, J. A. 
Lllquest, Rudolf 
Martlnsen, Ingvald 
Mattson, Hlldtng 
Mallne, Stanley 
McLean, Angus 
McVlcar. P. 
Meyer, Frank 
Mickelson, Harry 
Mli-klans, J. 
McPhersr>n, R. 
McDonald, J. 
Nelsen, Anton 
Nelsen, H. -14S0 
Nelson, A. B. 
Nelson, N. J. 
Neilson, O. 
Oberg, J. 
Ohm, Henrlch 
Olsen, Fred A. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, E. O. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, Nick 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, K. M. 
Pettersen, Eric 
Pettersen, Krlstlan 
Petersen, BJarne 
Peterson, Oscar 
Richardftsn, J. W. 
Richardson, E. C. 
Rod, S. 
Ruhr. Hans 
Sale, John 
Saarnl, Frank 
Saivesen, T. 
Samuelsen, H. N. 
Schurr, Harm 
Schelenz, C. 
Scott, W. N. 
Sick/nan, A. 
SlnnlB, G. 
Slmonsen, ■ 
Slaondsen. H 



1093 



Johnson, Gatterd 
Johnson, Chris 
Johansen, O. 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, John S. 
Jensen, V. J. 
Jorgensen, Adrian 
Jorgensen. D. 
Jullsen, C. A. 
Keane, John 
Kisor, Adlal 
Kelly, John 
Klahn, Karl 
Xlenk, K. A. 
Koppen, O. 
Krlstensen, N, 
Kristensen, K. 
Kukes, Conrad 
Kuten, Alex. 
Llndholm, A. 
Llndstrom, Geo. 
Lilburger, Wm. 
Llnne, Theodore 
Lokken, O. K. 
Lundgren. Carl 
Lund, Erik 
Lynch, J. P. 
McCoy, J. L. 
McKenzle, Dan. 
Miller, S. 
Monrad, Trygue 
Molurg, K. G. E 
Monroe, N. S. 
Mosley, S. E. 
Murphy, Thos. 
Muier, James 

Nelsen, Oscar 
Newman, J. S. 
Nielsen, C. L. 
Norshelm, Ben 
Nordstrom, A. R. 
Olsen. Louis 
Olsen, O. -697 
Odella. V. 
Olsen, Krlstlan 
Olsson, K. W. 
Owens, James 
O'Donnell, J. 
Person. Johan 
Peel. P. 

Peterson, John E. 
Plnerd, F. H. 
Plplor.e, J. 
Prlnz, Carl 
Runsten, Arthur 
Rylander, R. 
Rysock, M. van 



972 



Smith, C. J. 
Smeland, John 
Sommerfeld, P. L. 
Sohnn, M. 
Soroos, S. 
Sobel, R. 
Sterndoch, J. 
Strand, C. 
Stuhr. H. M. 
Svenson, Thure 
Bverdrup. Walter 



Sjoberg, G. 
Slandart, M. 
Talce, John 
Tangvalt, G. J. 
Thornqulst, A. 
Unwen, Harry 
Verst, C. A. 
Ward, Fred 
Watson, L. 
Wall, W. 
Whete. R. E. 
Williams, L. A. 
Wllhelmsen, S. 



Symons, W. A. 

Thorn, Arvid 
Thor. L. 
Thorpe, J. W. 
Vilen, 1. 
Vaher, C. 
Wllhelmsen. S 
Wilson, C. 
Wright, H. 
White, R. E. 
Ylonen, S. 
J. Yorkvelt, A. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, John 

(registered) 
Anderson, E. F. 

(registered) 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, Andrew 
Brandt. H. 
Berke, C. 
Barton, M. 
Brun, Mattias 
Bedford, A. 
Bradsbery, Geo. 
Carlson, Oscar 
Forsman, Niels 
Hansen, Johan G. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hanson, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Halvor 
Halvorsen, Hans 



Janson, John 
Johanesen, Alf. 
Johnson, Karl 
Johannesen, Jonas 
Johanson, Emil 
Jorgensen, Jack 
Kepper, Henry 
Kinnunnen, Ant. 
Olsen. Alf 
Petersen, Hans 
Roneld. P. 
Randmets, Mike 
Risenius, Sven 
Saro. W. R. 
Smith, Carl Johan 
Toren, Gustaf 
Tourela. Erick 
Vejvorda, Frank 
Wattel, P. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHER, FURNISHER A HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and F1r«t 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 
Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Alaska Fishermen's Letter List 



Aiil.i son, Oscar 
Bakinen, John 
Bjorseth, Konrad 
Bodehl, Hans 
Carlson Gust 
De Blom, A. 
Erlcson, Rob. 
Brlckson, John 
Bisen, Peter 
Groth, J. 
Gustavson, Emil 
Hansen, Emanuel 
Hansen, Anton 
.Johansen, F. C. 

son, Fritz 

^<>n. Emil 
Kjerdalen, Ole 
Ki istoffersen, H. O. 
Levele, Ed. 
Larsen, Theodore 

rd Heber 
Lindroos, Osear 
Lauren, William 
McNeil, Daniel Ross 
Monson, Jacob 



McVelar 

McDonald, J. B. 
Mikelsen, P. 
Nesbl, Frank 
Newton, A. B. 
Osterman, John 
Olsen, Thorn 
Olsen, John 
Ome. Tobias 
Olander. Erik 
Risse. W. M. 
Rasmusen, Peter 
Swanson, Oscar 
Smith, R. 
Skovba. Nils 
Shivers, Wibt 
Swanson, August 
Schultz, Walter 
Tennison, Peter 
Walgren. Hilmer 

Registered Letters 
Granzzi. Bora 
Meyer. Hans 
Mittenmeyer, J. 
Rassmussen, T. 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Domlnguez. Joseph Reilly. Ralph 
Oronlund, Oscar Rydelius, Rolp 



Johnson. John 
Kuhlmann. Emil 
Mnttson. Walter 
Melgail, Mlkel 
Person, Fritz, 

Leonard 
Ralnhard. H 



Shumko, Nick 
Smith, John 
Smith. Carl, Johan 
Svanson, Harold 
Swanson. H. -1216 
Thaysen. Arthur 
Thompson. T. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Porter" are requested to call at the 
Secretary's office for their vouchers 
for salvage services rendered to 
S. S. "Washington" on or about 
November 5, 1919. The vouchers are 
issued to the following members, 
and the respective amounts due 
thereon is as follows: 

Amudsen, R $22.50 

Mattson, Geo. J 22.50 



Any one knowing the nearest rela- 
tives of C. C. Stewart, a late member 
of the Marine Firemen's Union of 
the Atlantic, are kindly requested to 
communicate with the Secretary of 
the above organization at 70 South 
St., New York, N. Y. 3-3-2C 



Members of the crew of the "West 
Katan." whose claims for salvage 
services rendered to the S. S. "Fla- 
vel" is being handled by the under- 
signed: It has just come to my at- 
tention that the Shipping Board have 
asked you to sign vouchers in settle- 
ment of the salvage claim. I was 
offered onc-half-month's wages which 
was refused. It appears that they 
are endeavoring to get you men to 
settle directly. I advise that none of 
yon accept this as it is grossly in- 
adequate. At least you have no right 
to accept any settlement without 
consulting me. Silas B. Axtell, At- 
torney for Seamen, 9 State Street, 
New York City. 10-6-20 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1S90 

MEN'S CLOTHING, SHOES, HATg 

and FURNISHING GOODS 

108-110 Main Street Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Seamen's Outfitters 
C. P. Salmi & Co. 

Men's Furnishings 

Shoes, Hats and Oiled Clothing 

411 EAST HERON STREET 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

rHE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS. 

SHOES. COLLARS. SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 






HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Meaiur« 
Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts.. Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH